Workshops

Click or tap on a workshop to get expanded details, including the workshop summary and presenters.

Title Block Time Summary Track
The PoCC Leadership Institute for Educators of Color Leadership Institute Wednesday, November 29,
8:30 AM-4:00 PM
  • Summary: Gain powerful strategies to help you advance to the next level of leadership while building your network of fellow leaders, mentors, and sponsors in this unique seminar for educators of color. The PoCC Leadership Institute (PLI) offers state-of-the-art leadership development tools and strategies. These include the Everything DiSC Work of Leaders Profile, a research based skills inventory that will provide you with a deeper understanding of your individual leadership strengths and style. The seminar format includes in-the-moment coaching, peer exchange, and post-institute follow-up — all in an encouraging atmosphere designed to nurture a compelling vision for fulfilling your career goals. Through facilitated dialogue with education leaders, you will gain an insider view into critical moves for long-term professional and personal growth. Topics include working effectively with mentors and sponsors, “hiring” and evaluating your advocate during a search process, acquiring the critical skills heads of school and key leaders wish they had before assuming their positions, and developing professional growth plans. You will also be invited to a post-institute online leadership development and support community. Note: This institute is open to educators of color employed in pre-K–12 schools.
  • Block: Leadership Institute (Wednesday, November 29, 8:30 AM-4:00 PM)
  • Room number: 210D
  • Category: PoCC Equity Seminar > Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Amani Reed, The School at Columbia University (NY); Nicole DuFauchard, The Advent School (MA); Sherry Coleman, Coleman Strategic Consulting
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
ES1. Building Bridges: Unlearning Anti-Blackness Within Communities of Color Pre-Conference Equity Seminars Wednesday, November 29,
8:30 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: How does Anti-Blackness divide us? How can we build power together? Through discussion centered on black and Asian-American/Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities, this interactive seminar will explore how white supremacy affects the relationships between people of color. You will reflect on your racial identity and life experiences to begin to dismantle Anti-Black narratives. Then you will engage in honest and complex cross-racial dialogue as we rededicate ourselves to an inclusive fight for social justice. To allow you to share unique experiences, this seminar will include focused breakout groups — one for AAPI educators, one for black educators, and additional groups as needed. You and all other participants will then come together to share-out your reflections and examine what keeps communities of color from showing up for each other. Together, we will strategize about ways to make a greater collective impact in our independent school communities and beyond.
  • Block: Pre-Conference Equity Seminars (Wednesday, November 29, 8:30 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 202A
  • Category: PoCC Equity Seminar > Half Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Jacqueline Thompson, Alta Vista School (CA); Rochelle Reodica, San Francisco University High School (CA); Tinia Merriweather, Ethical Culture Fieldston School (NY)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
ES10. A Conversation: The Fluidity of Gender, Racial, and Sexual Identities in Young People Today Pre-Conference Equity Seminars Wednesday, November 29,
8:30 AM-4:00 PM
  • Summary: Young people are exploding the traditional binaries and boxes that society has used to define identity. As the understanding of gender, race, and sexual orientation as social constructs becomes more socially accepted, gender is no longer about being just male or female. Race is no longer about being just black or white. And sexuality is no longer limited to being gay or straight. Join current educators for an interactive conversation about the implications of these emerging identities and ideas in a school community. Note: This workshop will be in four parts so that all participants can learn collectively and share unique experiences in two focused breakout groups: one for educators of color and one for white educators. All participants will then come together to share-out their reflections on inclusive practices.
  • Block: Pre-Conference Equity Seminars (Wednesday, November 29, 8:30 AM-4:00 PM)
  • Room number: 207D
  • Category: PoCC Equity Seminar > Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Morgan Darby, The Children’s School (GA); Daniel Chin, The Park School (MA); Vanessa Savas, Beaver Country Day School (MA); Jen Willsea, Senior Associate, Interaction Institute for Social Change
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
ES11. Equity through Collaboration: Building and Sustaining Academic Excellence Pre-Conference Equity Seminars Wednesday, November 29,
8:30 AM-4:00 PM
  • Summary: Equity work is often seen as an add-on; schools rely on the diversity director or a few key personnel to offer programming that promotes “inclusion.” Although cocurricular programming is exceedingly important, it doesn’t fully address what happens in the classroom. This session will explore the research that affirms diversity as a vital element in academic excellence. We will look at institutional and classroom practices that promote academic success for all students. By developing the skills to evaluate and assess teaching and learning on campus, we can create school communities that move beyond cultural competency and embrace a true equity pedagogy.
  • Block: Pre-Conference Equity Seminars (Wednesday, November 29, 8:30 AM-4:00 PM)
  • Room number: 208B
  • Category: PoCC Equity Seminar > Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Elizabeth Denevi, East ED; Mariama Richards, Friends Central School (PA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
ES12. The Guide for White Women Who Teach Black Boys Pre-Conference Equity Seminars Wednesday, November 29,
8:30 AM-4:00 PM
  • Summary: This workshop is based on the new book The Guide for White Women Who Teach Black Boys, created to support white women as they engage in focused inquiry around their relationships with black male students and the impact of race and racism on those relationships. Like the book, this seminar requires you to work through activities thatmay challenge you, to honestly reflect on who you are and where you come from, and to consider your role in possibly perpetuating an inherently white and privileged society. The goal is to support you as a white teacher as you seek opportunities for personal growth as an educator and for encouraging the academic achievement of your black male students. While engaging in personal and professional introspective work, you’ll experience works by experts, stories by educators and students, and videos that will help personalize the educational lives of black males.
  • Block: Pre-Conference Equity Seminars (Wednesday, November 29, 8:30 AM-4:00 PM)
  • Room number: 209B
  • Category: PoCC Equity Seminar > Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Eddie Moore, Jr. and Marguerite Penick-Parks, The Privilege Institute; Ali Michael, The Race Institute for K–12 Educators
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
ES13. Real World "Get Out": Film as Springboard for Cross-Racial Solidarity Pre-Conference Equity Seminars Wednesday, November 29,
8:30 AM-4:00 PM
  • Summary: The film “Get Out” by director Jordan Peele used a number of different lenses to examine race, racism, exploitation, complicity, and violence within, among, and against communities of color. Since its release, some on social media have used the phrase “sunken room” to describe the climate and conditions in which people of color experience historically white independent schools. While depicted as a horror movie, “Get Out” prompted many people of color to comment that this wasn’t horror — it was everyday existence. Many also reported that they heard different reactions depending on whether discussion of the movie took place in predominantly white or predominantly black/brown circles. We will discuss issues of race, racism, white fragility, and cross-racial interactions that are highlighted in the film and explore how they mirror our own experiences.
  • Block: Pre-Conference Equity Seminars (Wednesday, November 29, 8:30 AM-4:00 PM)
  • Room number: 208A
  • Category: PoCC Equity Seminar > Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Liza Talusan, The Park School (MA); Shanelle Robinson, Friends Academy (NY); Steven Tejada, Maret School (DC)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
ES14. Seeking Cultural Competence in Hiring: Practical Methods and Strategies for Identifying the Administrators, Staff, and Faculty Needed in the 21st Century Independent Schools Pre-Conference Equity Seminars Wednesday, November 29,
8:30 AM-4:00 PM
  • Summary: Independent schools can no longer afford to hire faculty, administrators, and other staff who are not culturally competent. Lack of cultural competence directly affects the environment for students; it leads to lower achievement rates for underrepresented individuals and miseducation and poor role modeling for all. Hiring without cultural competence in mind also leads directly to problems with retention. Without shared responsibility for inclusion and equity, the overworked few who possess the necessary skills will often want to leave as soon as other opportunities become available. For all these reasons, your school should view hiring for any position as an opportunity to improve cultural competency at every level. Your hiring processes should include ways to evaluate candidates’ actual knowledge, skills, and abilities to work effectively, respectfully, and inclusively with all current and future members of your school community — colleagues, students, parents, alumni, and community members. Your processes should also differentiate knowledgeable candidates from those who lack these critical skills.
  • Block: Pre-Conference Equity Seminars (Wednesday, November 29, 8:30 AM-4:00 PM)
  • Room number: 210B
  • Category: PoCC Equity Seminar > Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Cristine Clifford Cullinan, ALiVE: Actual Leadership in Vital Equity; Ruth Jurgensen, Francis W. Parker School (IL); Catherine Georges and Doug Le Blanc, The School at Columbia University (NY); Steve Morris, San Francisco School (CA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
ES15. Uniting Our Efforts for Deeper Impact Pre-Conference Equity Seminars Wednesday, November 29,
8:30 AM-4:00 PM
  • Summary: Too many schools place diversity and inclusion, global programs, and teaching and learning in silos. This misses the opportunity to integrate inclusivity, global education, and culturally responsive teaching for greater strength and impact. Often, it also leaves you jockeying for resources. This seminar will provide a framework for finding common ground while recognizing where each area has a distinct role to play. It’s for teachers, global and diversity directors, and administrators who want to explore how these areas currently function and then develop a comprehensive plan to bring them together effectively. You’ll walk away with greater understanding, frameworks, and action plans.
  • Block: Pre-Conference Equity Seminars (Wednesday, November 29, 8:30 AM-4:00 PM)
  • Room number: 207A
  • Category: PoCC Equity Seminar > Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Rosetta Lee, Seattle Girls’ School (WA); Jennifer Klein, PRINCIPLED Learning Strategies; Kapono Ciotti, Wai’alae Elementary Public Charter School (HI)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
ES2. Deep Diversity: How Brain Science Advances, and Challenges, Racial Justice Education Pre-Conference Equity Seminars Wednesday, November 29,
8:30 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: In this award-winning training session, you will explore how the unconscious mind dominates in human interactions, especially those related to perpetuating racism and Islamophobia. This interactive seminar will demonstrate how you can advance racial justice education by integrating neuroscience. You’ll learn strategies that reduce resistance and backlash by learners, especially by those with the most privilege, and avoid common activist traps that unwittingly support oppression, cynicism, and burnout.
  • Block: Pre-Conference Equity Seminars (Wednesday, November 29, 8:30 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 202B
  • Category: PoCC Equity Seminar > Half Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Shakil Choudhury, Anima Leadership
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
ES3. From Diversity Practices to Strategic Diversity Initiatives: The Path to a Sustained Inclusive Culture Pre-Conference Equity Seminars Wednesday, November 29,
8:30 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Although no single recipe for diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) is right for every school, all diversity practitioners (and their allies) must approach their work from a strategic vantage point. If your school needs more faculty of color, you should take a systems approach to hiring. If you want to improve cultural competence, you must rethink professional development for all faculty and staff. This seminar draws on change management research plus principles of strategic planning and systems of operation within schools. Working from that foundation, you’ll understand how to identify a sound DEI practice and develop sustained protocols so that DEI naturally becomes a recurring practice in your school.
  • Block: Pre-Conference Equity Seminars (Wednesday, November 29, 8:30 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 203B
  • Category: PoCC Equity Seminar > Half Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Andre Withers, The Madeira School (VA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
ES4. Measuring equity and inclusion: Assessment and accountability for institutional growth Pre-Conference Equity Seminars Wednesday, November 29,
8:30 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Learn how institutional assessment of equity and inclusion can help you see how well your community is fulfilling the educational promise you make to every student and family. This seminar will build your understanding of what assessing equity and inclusion involves; why it’s vital; and how other schools and organizations are assessing their equity and inclusion growth, efficacy, strengths, and needs. The session will draw from specific case studies, principles of effective practices, and participant questions. Then it will show how your commitment to assessing equity and inclusion is its own professional growth process — a process that enhances your school’s understandings, tools, and capacity to know where it is now compared to where it envisions being in the future.
  • Block: Pre-Conference Equity Seminars (Wednesday, November 29, 8:30 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 203B
  • Category: PoCC Equity Seminar > Half Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Alison Park, Blink Consulting
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
ES5. Access, Privacy, and Security: Examining Our Digital Lives as Educators of Color Pre-Conference Equity Seminars Wednesday, November 29,
8:30 AM-4:00 PM
  • Summary: In the information economy, data have become the new gold. How can we as educators, as people of color, and as citizens ensure adequate access and sufficient privacy in our digital day-to-day lives? This seminar will provide you with critical insights about the digital tools you use and the vast streams of data you create as a result. Through hands-on practice, meaningful discussion, and expert facilitators, you’ll grow your understanding of the fine-print realities of your online life and gain an introduction to possible security measures for home and school.
  • Block: Pre-Conference Equity Seminars (Wednesday, November 29, 8:30 AM-4:00 PM)
  • Room number: 207B
  • Category: PoCC Equity Seminar > Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Sherri Spelic, American International School Vienna (Austria); Chris Gilliard, Macomb Community College; Bill Fitzgerald, Common Sense Media
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
ES6. Advanced Facilitation Skills for POC Navigating Difficult Conversations About Racism, White Privilege, and Oppression Pre-Conference Equity Seminars Wednesday, November 29,
8:30 AM-4:00 PM
  • Summary: This seminar is for people of color who, formally or informally, engage in facilitating social justice interactions and difficult conversations related to racism and oppression. In this skill-building workshop, you will grow your ability in — and deepen your comfort with — clearly defining, explaining, and discussing the construction of oppression with individuals at varying levels of experience. You’ll witness and learn how to establish and hold safe(r) spaces for dialogue, enabling groups to lean into discomfort. You’ll also study and practice using facilitation tools and various methodologies that you can apply one-on-one and in large and small groups when leading meaningful, effective conversations related to racism and oppression. Finally, you will address challenges that are unique to people of color who engage in difficult conversations, including the need for performing self-care and maintaining safety.
  • Block: Pre-Conference Equity Seminars (Wednesday, November 29, 8:30 AM-4:00 PM)
  • Room number: 210A
  • Category: PoCC Equity Seminar > Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Natalie Thoreson, inVision Consulting
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
ES7. Ally is a Verb: The Role of White Educators at PoCC and Beyond Pre-Conference Equity Seminars Wednesday, November 29,
8:30 AM-4:00 PM
  • Summary: This seminar, intended for white participants, will cover why and how white educators can better support equity and justice initiatives in schools. The focus is on the importance of white affinity work and the development of accountable cross-racial partnerships. Topics include how white educators can deepen their understanding of race and racism, whiteness, and the potential for transformative pedagogy by working with each other to develop their identities as anti-racist educators; the history of institutional racism and its current manifestations in the U.S.; the role of white educators at PoCC and beyond; and why it’s important for white educators to examine their own racial identity. Participants will learn how to support each other in their ongoing work to understand the impact of race and racism on their lives and teaching practice.
  • Block: Pre-Conference Equity Seminars (Wednesday, November 29, 8:30 AM-4:00 PM)
  • Room number: 207C
  • Category: PoCC Equity Seminar > Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: David Byrnes, The Nightingale-Bamford School (NY); Elena Jaime, Little Red School House & Elisabeth Irwin High School (NY); Randy Clancy, Benny Vasquez, and Anshu Wahi, CARLE Institute
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
ES8. Building Equity, Justice and Community for LGBTQ People of Color in Independent Schools Pre-Conference Equity Seminars Wednesday, November 29,
8:30 AM-4:00 PM
  • Summary: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people of color often possess a heightened sense of awareness about marginalized groups; the impact of racism, sexism, and homophobia; and issues of equity and inclusion in independent schools. In this seminar, LGBTQ people of color educators will reflect on their experiences in independent schools. Participants will explore the intersection of their identities — those related to race, sexual orientation, and gender — within the context of independent schools’ educational philosophies and practices. The purpose is to use this seminar to develop a network of support for LGBTQ people of color. Together we will brainstorm to create a strategic plan for initiatives that support LGBTQ people of color and educate administrators, teachers, and students in independent schools.
  • Block: Pre-Conference Equity Seminars (Wednesday, November 29, 8:30 AM-4:00 PM)
  • Room number: 209A
  • Category: PoCC Equity Seminar > Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Philip McAdoo, Sidwell Friends School (DC); Quinton Walker, University School of Nashville (TN)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
ES9. Code-Switching 2.0: Doing the Right Things from Multiple Vantage Points Pre-Conference Equity Seminars Wednesday, November 29,
8:30 AM-4:00 PM
  • Summary: If you want to improve your roles and practices concerning cultural responsiveness, this experiential session will help you break new ground. Explore ways to deepen, anchor, and illuminate your core values, beliefs, expectations, and orientations as you access empathy to extend your own borders — that is, the boundaries of self. This session uses integral theory and culturally responsive self assessment resources from the presenter’s original research. This seminar will help you build skills and competencies that forge critical pathways toward ethical practice, inclusive excellence, and social justice in schools and other organizations. You will emerge from this experience strengthened in self empathy and social empathy. You’ll also be empowered to provide “helpful-help” in teaching, evaluation, advising, and other educational contexts.
  • Block: Pre-Conference Equity Seminars (Wednesday, November 29, 8:30 AM-4:00 PM)
  • Room number: 210C
  • Category: PoCC Equity Seminar > Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Hazel Symonette, University of Wisconsin-Madison
A Change Is Gonna Come: Musical Journeys Through American Race Relations A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Equal parts live performance and lecture, A Change Is Gonna Come: Musical Journeys Through American Race Relations is a unique way of experiencing the impact of music on American culture, identity and social progress. Our songs, and the stories that surround them offer vivid insight into the mood of the times and represent a crucial ingredient in movements uniting people in their struggle for progress, unity and betterment. They also highlight our gradual but oftentimes spectacular triumphs over racism and class discrimination. Cultural activist and musician Eric Dozier takes you on a journey, shining a light at the crossroads of music and American race relations by performing and analyzing songs and their creator from various eras. By the end of the session, participants understand what it means to be an active and creative advocate of equity and justice imbued with a renewed sense of mission and commitment to being the change they wish to see. They'll even get to sing a bit themselves, viscerally experiencing the power of the group song!
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 153
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Eric Dozier, Episcopal School of Nashville (TN)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Amplifying Student Voice: A Case Study of a Leadership and Discipline Program with Minority Students A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: For many American Muslim families, the fear of having their belief systems invalidated, ignored, and even actively contested in public schools is a very real concern in the wake of recent elections and the rise in hate crimes. How do educators support the development of a strong sense of self in students whose identity is explicitly and implicitly seen as suspect by the dominant majority? Educators and administrators at our Islamic independent school in Orange County, California, work toward answering this question each day. By using two programs, Positive Discipline and The Leader in Me, the administration and teachers have flattened the hierarchy usually inherent in schools. This flattened hierarchy uses relationships as the basis of influence rather than rewards and punishment — and it promotes student involvement through a shared decision-making process. In addition, both Positive Discipline and The Leader in Me help create a space for student voice and provide students with ample opportunity for self-efficacy, self-determination, and self-expression.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 204A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Dina Eletreby and Uzma Said, New Horizon School (CA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Asians Behaving Critically (ABCs): Developing Resources for Asian-American Student Activists A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Over the past few years, there have been conscientious efforts to increase access to racially diverse characters and issues in children’s books. However, there are still communities that remain underrepresented (or not represented at all) in grade-level reading text. More specifically, a gap exists in literature featuring Asian-American characters and addressing Asian-American issues. Find ways to implement culturally relevant and responsive text that includes Asian Americans so we can build better windows and mirrors in our classrooms. How might we create project-based learning opportunities within our schools to shape and build this library of resources?
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 210C
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Liza Talusan, The Park School (MA)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Bridging the Asian-American and Asian International Student Divide A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Many independent schools have increased recruiting and accepting international Asian students. As of 2015, in Massachusetts alone, the five-year growth rate of international Asian students was 158% — and 221% in Rhode Island. Yet, these international Asian students are often at odds — culturally, socially, and politically — with an existing Asian-American student population. Examine how best to create dialogue between these two demographics. Should our goal as equity and inclusion practitioners be to unify affinity spaces or create separate ones? How do we involve Asian students in discussions of U.S. racial politics, #BlackLivesMatter, or even affirmative action? Is there a need for a unified Asian-American political identity? Also focus on institutional policies and practices that may need to adapt, given this changing demographic, such as admissions, college counseling, and residential life. Learn strategies to empower ourselves as educators, as well as our Asian international and domestic students.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 208A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Adrian Khactu, Phillips Academy (MA)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Catalytic Encounter: Melding Heart Work and Logic Work A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: We often pour our energy into the machinery of crafting lesson plans, attending committee meetings, handling a parent grievance, and occasionally shifting institutional Goliath. If you seek a unique way to invite a practice of self-care to keep your energy bar at the Full setting, then I invite you to attend this session. Take this opportunity to experience a blend of Catalytic Thinking and the Points of You approach that offer a self-reflection process that provides a way to pause, expand perspectives, focus on opportunity, and take action.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 207D
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Antonio Hernandez, Reflective Wisdom
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Cultural Competency: A Sixth Grade Curriculum A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Discuss the curriculum developed at this K-12 school to ensure all sixth grade students intentionally engage in conversation about what it means to be culturally competent. Cultural competency begins with self-awareness; one cannot learn about the culture of others without first understanding their own. As such, this mandatory course encourages students to delve into various aspects of their own identity. Students must engage in intense self-reflection to find the source of pride and fulfillment they feel because of these identifiers, as well as to examine the stereotypes and challenges that may be attached to their identifiers. Students learn about themselves and classmates through presentations and group projects. See samples of student presentations.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 202A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Diana Artis and Eva Ostrowsky, The Pingry School (NJ)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Extending Social Justice to the Middle Eastern Other in Our Schools and Communities A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Examine the experience of being Middle Eastern, a complex and diverse classification, in a conversation on the struggle for social justice, equity, and empathy. Explore the theory of Orientalism as the driving force behind much of the "West's" approaches to understanding and representing the Middle East for decades. Pay particular attention to the ways Orientalist understandings of the Middle Eastern other have continually perpetuated stigmas that limit our ability to discuss social justice, equity, and human rights when it comes to the region, its people, and most recently, its immigrants. Hear stories of injustice and suffering, open our minds to understanding this most misunderstood other, and commit ourselves to embracing the Middle Eastern narrative as one of our own in the struggle for justice. Review case studies from independent schools to learn concrete ways to incorporate empathy for the Middle Eastern other in our classrooms and communities.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 202B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Nadim Bawalsa, Friends Seminary (NY)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Going Deeper with Difficult Conversations Through a Social-Emotional Learning Approach A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Learn how having conversations around cultural identity, social justice, inclusivity, equity, and advocacy can be deeper and more impactful with an SEL (social and emotional learning) approach. The RULER program, from Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, is an evidence-based approach to SEL that focuses on building emotional intelligence and creating positive, prosocial school climates. By using RULER, which builds community through a common language and framework, children, teachers, and parents can engage in difficult conversations. See how strengthening children's SEL skills help develop self-awareness, curtail antisocial behavior, reduce conflict, and build greater empathy and understanding for stronger relationships in the school community. Get curricular examples of SEL and diversity work, schoolwide programs, collaborative private/public school projects, and ways to strengthen home-school connections from DK (developmental kindergarten) through eighth grade for greater authentic learning.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 209A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Steve Futterman, Christina Kim, Michael Lin, Andrea Passerella, and Erica Warren, The Willows Community School (CA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
How Do We Use Science to Deconstruct Race and Analyze the Impacts of Racism? A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Race may not be biologically based, but racism is the shared reality of all members of our society. Middle school students are sophisticated enough to examine and unpack implicit bias, systemic vs. overt racism, and race as a social construct within the context of a life science or biology curriculum in which students engage with and learn the essential science and engineering practices put forth by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Discover a model that has been used successfully in a seventh grade classroom to guide students to uncover common misconceptions they hold about race and racial identity, and support them in challenging their ideas using evidence from DNA, evolution, census data, neuroscience, psychology, and current research.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 207A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Angela Flynn, The Gordon School (RI)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
How to Be Asian A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Modern Asian-American identity is a product of immigration policies in the past and present that reflect America’s complicated feelings about outsiders, especially Asians. Because the term lumps together a disparate group of peoples, the identity is diffuse and seems meaningless to many. But claiming the word and the identity offers us an opportunity to develop a more powerful voice for ourselves and be allies to our brothers and sisters with different identities. This requires finding commonalities, understanding differences, and building affinity spaces for reflective and honest discussions. A strong sense of Asian-American history, history of antiblack racism, and the development of the Model Minority Myth have to be an integral part of identity formation. A new generation of Asian Americans will lead the way in forming an inclusive Asian-American identity.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 208B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Jolina Clement, Archer School for Girls (CA); Saber Khan, The Browning School (NY); Morika Tsujimura, Bank Street School for Children (NY); Susan Yao, St. Luke's School (NY)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
How to Implement Middle School Racial Affinity Groups: One School's Journey A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Examine the evolution of Redwood Day’s equity and inclusion affinity work in the last four years, specifically how we’ve implemented racial affinity groups for middle school students. Hear about the administrative infrastructure needed to support this initiative, the developmental scaffolding in grades K-6 that culminates in racial affinity groups in seventh and eighth grades, and the curriculum of the affinity groups themselves. Receive strategies for putting affinity groups in place, a K-8 scope and sequence, general best practices, and a more detailed look at the seventh and eighth grade affinity groups. This initiative is a work in progress, evolving yearly. Take this opportunity to learn from one another and share your own experiences.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 163
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Simon Alejandrino, Shefali Nanavati, and Cheryl Ting, Redwood Day School (CA)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
It's Our Space, Too: Designing Systems Needed for a Positive School Climate A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Even with the push for growth in diversity, many independent schools still struggle to support faculty and students of color as they acclimate to a private school environment. When students of color grow up in or matriculate into these schools, numerous roadblocks can hinder their success. What systems are in place to support these students and who manages them? Using interview data collected from faculty and students at independent schools, investigate case studies and walk through the design-thinking process (developed by the Stanford d-School) to create or re-imagine systems that will support the needs of students of color despite a potential lack of a more diverse faculty, staff, and administration. Build prototypes of a system designed to promote positive, supportive, and understanding environments for students of color from elementary to the collegiate level.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 210B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Joshua Childs, University of Texas at Austin; Carla Childs, St. Andrews School (TX); Vanessa Rodriguez, Dallas Independent School District; Celeste Sanders, Greenhill School (TX)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
It's Your Time: Aspiring Women Administrators of Color A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Aspiring women leaders of color, learn about preparing for, applying to, and sustaining a career in administration. Engage in a series of reflective activities, benefit from the wisdom of the direct experience of women leaders of color, and gain strategies for working in independent school administration. Additionally, get empowered to form your own networks that allow for professional rejuvenation and support as you navigate your first years in leadership positions.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 152
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Lori Cohen, The Bay School of San Francisco (CA); Shoba Farrell, San Francisco University High School (CA); Juna McDaid, Sonoma Country Day School (CA); Tamisha Williams, Lick-Wilmerding High School (CA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Leadership Branding for People of Color in Independent Schools: The Critical Role of Authenticity A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Collectively explore a “typical” day in the life for you and colleagues. Engage in interactive discussions, exercises, and lessons on what calls people of color to leadership in independent schools, the barriers that prevent leaders of color from bringing their full selves to their roles, and collectively developing a shared definition of authenticity for leaders of color in independent schools. Together, discover the difference between leadership brand promises vs. leadership brand experiences, the four Cs of a leadership ecosystem for leaders of color, and the definition and characteristics of leadership branding for leaders of color. Let’s raise our voices as leaders of color in independent schools to respond to an adaptation of Tina Turner’s lyric, “What’s authenticity got to do with it?” for leaders of color in independent schools.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 162
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Gene Batiste, Gene Batiste Consulting; Raymond Yu, The Blake School (MN)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
SoCal POCIS: Our Journey to Developing a Regional Diversity and an Equity Organization A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: SoCal PoCIS is a grassroots organization that has been in existence for over 20 years. In that time, our organization has grown from 5 member schools to a membership of 45 schools. Our mission is to inspire and empower practices that create greater equity, diversity and inclusion within independent school communities throughout Southern California. We have three very active committees (Marketing,Membership and Appreciation, Technology and Innovation, and Program and Events) that are staffed by our board members, which help plan, develop, and market several events throughout year. Please join us to find out how we have been able to establish the organization and these events in a sustainable manner, and to learn how you might use our experience to develop an organization in your region.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 209B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Olivia Brown and John West, SoCal POCIS; Ernest Levroney, Windward School (CA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Teaching Toni Morrison to Dismantle White Supremacy A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: How can foundational texts taught in most English Departments in independent schools perpetuate and normalize racist and sexist narratives? With an understanding that high school students are in a crucial stage of identity formation, how can the works of Toni Morrison be taught in a way that reveal counter narratives to the destructive messaging of the aforementioned texts? Song of Solomon and Beloved both serve to counter the dominant culture’s alienating race and gender narratives. These novels open a conversation about how white gendered norms colonize our minds and perpetuate systems of oppression. In this workshop, participants will learn strategies of how to draw on oral traditions in order to reveal the healing power of storytelling for all students. We will discuss how to inspire students to listen first and learn from Morrison’s stories as a way to find their own voices. This workshop will feature student testimonies of the transformative power of learning to tell their own stories in order to be free.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 210D
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Kamaya Thompson, Hawken School (PA); Anne Howe, Georgetown Day School (DC)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Technicolor: Sharing Our Experiences of Transitioning into Technology and Innovation A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Are you involved in technology in independent schools? Would you like to pursue career opportunities related to technology? Come listen to a panel of people of color who currently work in this empowering field. Hear us explain what we do in our schools, share our unique stories, and offer advice and insights for others considering doing something technology-related in their schools. Most important, talk with us about the potential impact we have on the lives of our students as people of color in this critical educational field.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 203A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Tye Campbell, Gilman School (MD); Gina Marcel, The School at Columbia University (NY); Dave Miller, Lakeside School (WA)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
The Art of Storytelling: How TED Helps Students Find and Share Their Voice A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Giving voice to issues of equity and social justice is a crucial part of our diversity work in schools. This work reminds us of the importance of providing students with windows to see and hear the experiences of others. It also reminds us of the importance of providing mirrors for our students, so they can see themselves reflected in the curriculum, population, and values within their school. A powerful way to provide this is through the art of storytelling. Providing students with opportunities to find, strengthen, and share their voice can be a transformative experience for both the orator and the audience. TEDx events and TED-Ed clubs exemplify this, allowing students to discover, explore, and present their own ideas and many facets of their identity in the form of short, TED-style talks. They can be a vehicle for social change and reflection. Find out how to develop your own TEDx event or TED-Ed club, allowing your students to continue to use the windows and mirrors around them.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 203B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Ara Brown, Cranbrook Schools (MI); Nola-rae Cronan, Columbus School for Girls (MI)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
The Case for Emotional Emancipation A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: This presentation will address the root causes of the devaluing of Black lives around the world: the lies of White superiority and Black inferiority. Dr. Grills will explore the damaging effects of the psychological, cultural, and historical trauma caused by the lies, and introduce the Emotional Emancipation (EE) Circle SM support group process--designed to help Black people heal from, and overturn, the lies. Originated by Community Healing Network (CHN) and developed by CHN in collaboration with the Association of Black Psychologists (ABPsi), EE Circles are among a range of initiatives created by CHN to build the global grassroots movement for emotional emancipation –-to help Black people across the Diaspora free ourselves from the lies, and reclaim our dignity and humanity as people of African ancestry. EE Circles are evidence-informed, psychologically sound, culturally grounded, psycho-educational in nature, and designed to be facilitated by trained lay people. In early evaluations, EE Circle participants report improvements in every indicator of mental health. Working together, CHN and ABPsi have trained more than 500 EE Circle facilitators and planted seeds for a global network of EE Circles in more than 30 cities in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Cuba.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 204B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Cheryl Grills, Loyola Marymount University Los Angeles
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
The N!gga(er) Word: Is There a Message in the Madness? A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Look at the history of the “N-word” utilizing books, TV shows, film clips, and a documentary film. See how current events, media, popular music, and movies have used the word over the years and if the word has had any impact or influence on the millennial generation. Discuss the need and importance of understanding the various realities associated with the N-word and gain recommendations on how to challenge and encourage all people — specifically young people — to understand the ramifications of casual or uninformed usage of this troublesome word.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 210A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Eddie Moore Jr., The Privilege Institute
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Understanding AIM: The Assessment of Inclusivity and Multiculturalism at NAIS A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: For more than 10 years, the NAIS Assessment of Inclusivity and Multiculturalism (AIM) has provided schools with a deep understanding of the climate of inclusion on their campuses, from current and past students to teachers, administrators, and trustees. But why use AIM? In many schools, the benefits of diversity, equity, and inclusion are viewed as intangibles — good things to have, to do, and to profess, but not necessarily the grounds of structured processes and accountability. Come learn more about AIM and gain a better understanding of how AIM can convert thoughts, ideas, and assumed best practices into benchmarked numbers for real goal setting.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 207B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Paula Farmer, The Berkeley School (CA); Michael Goodman, NAIS
Data Use in Activism: Evidence-based Equity and Justice Programming, Research and Evaluation
What I Said and What I Meant: Cross-Cultural Communication A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Humans communicate on many levels; that we have cultural identities and experiences increases the probability of miscommunications. Examine cross-cultural communication theories; ways that cultural values, power, and privilege affect the way we communicate; tools for questioning assumptions; and ways to improve cross-cultural communication skills. Learn to identify various dimensions of culture and how they influence our communication, recognize common pitfalls of cross-cultural communication that lead to conflict, and gain competencies and tools for cross-cultural communication. Come for presentations on theory and models, interactive and reflective activities, and several take-home tools to bring back to your school, community, and personal life.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 204B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Rosetta Lee, Seattle Girls' School (WA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Yes You Can! Bringing Equity, Justice, and Action to Our Youngest Generation A Thursday, November 30,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: How do the youngest generations of our school communities engage in the work of equity, justice, and action? Discover how a team of educators in a lower school program (K-2) took their school’s commitment to diversity and turned it into a movement among their youngest students! Share the results of learning experiences in identity, equity, and social justice, and how they created driven, action-oriented deliverables. In alignment with Social Justice Standards: The Teaching Tolerance Anti-Bias Framework, ideas of identity and diversity flow heavily throughout our primary school curriculum. In our current program students develop a strong understanding of who they are, and engage regularly in noticing and accepting the differences of others. What happens when these same students are empowered to take this confidence and apply it to causes they are passionate about? Look at the concepts and strategies we put into place and acquire ways you can replicate these ideas and models honoring the youngest voices in our schools.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 30, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 207C
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: April Greene, Tasha Jackson-Jones, and Kristin Peck, Lowell School (DC)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
“Being the Right Kind of Black” in Independent Schools B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: While dominant culture males are viewed as confident, knowledgeable, and/or passionate, as they represent themselves in our school communities, adjectives like overconfident, arrogant, militant, belligerent, and hostile become labels used to describe black men representing themselves in myriad ways, despite there being no difference with their dominant culture counterparts. These racialized and aggressive tropes are not value neutral and impact the social and emotional well-being of our black male community as well as the overall health of our campuses. Unpack, interrogate, and analyze these projected identities and discuss why this “otherization” occurs as we strategize approaches to increase awareness and reduce the negative framing of black male identity.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 153
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Charles Owens and Aaron Timmons, Greenhill School (TX)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
A Family Affair: Engaging and Supporting Parents of Color B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Now in its 10th year, the New Jersey SEEDS Parents Program provides invaluable support to families in their successful transition to more than 150 independent schools across the country, serving well over 2,200 students and their families. Continue the conversation from PoCC 2013, examine firsthand the experiences of families of color at independent schools, and share best practices for increasing parent engagement. Through a presentation of survey results and parent testimonials, gain a better understanding of the independent school environment for students and parents of color and benefit from proven strategies for building inclusive communities for diverse families.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 207C
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Imani Gilliam and Jamie McClintock, New Jersey SEEDS
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
ABCs of TRAs (Transracial Adoptees) B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Are transracial adoptees on the rise in your school and classroom? Wondering how to best serve them? This workshop is “TRA 101.” Look at a basic identity development overview from K - 12, touching upon racial identity formation, intersectionality, and formative adoptive experiences. Following the brief presentation, engage in open dialogue and discussion about practicals, drawing on the wisdom and personal experiences of adult adoptee panelists as well as participants in the room.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 208A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: John Bower, The Rivers School (MA); Amanda Friedman, Hopkins School (CT); Jennifer Hammond, Deerfield Academy (MA); John Hoye, The John Cooper School (TX); Taelyn Tyler, Charlotte Latin School (NC)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Affirm Experiences, Build Bridges, Cultivate Community: Authentic Engagement of Alumni of Color B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Diversity directors, heads of school, and development officers, explore reasons why alumni of color participation tends to be low in independent schools and what you can begin to do to reverse the trend. What factors impact alumni of color engagement or disengagement? What strategies can be used to re-engage alumni? Explore these questions as you reflect on your efforts and the challenges you experience. Then work in pairs to apply strategies presented to create authentic engagement opportunities with alumni of color. Leave with a draft of your goals, an approach, and resources to support the goals.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 207B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Trina Gary, Independent Trust; Isaiah Suggs, McClain's Mergers and Acquisitions
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Between Laughter and Tears: The Quandaries of Teaching About the Black Experience in America B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Explore the dilemmas educators face when teaching students about African-American history and culture. Drawing on sociologist Orlando Patterson’s framing of the catastrophic versus survivalist interpretations of black history, examine what’s at stake when trying to authentically convey the “black experience” to students in late middle school and secondary school classrooms. How might a focus on racial difference obscure the realities of class and gender in African-American communities? How does positionality influence what and how we teach? How do our students’ varied racial identities and experiences impact their learning about white supremacy and the history of racism in the U.S.? How do reductionist narratives of black history create unconscious bias in our students who may lack authentic connections to African-American people or communities? Consider a pedagogy that emphasizes structural causes of racism and diversity within black communities. Gain field-tested pedagogical resources and curricular examples to use in your own class, and reflect and share of best practices.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 202B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Elijah Anderson, The Gordon School (RI)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Carving Space, Improv, and Inclusion: Making Space for All Bodies B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Discover ways to facilitate and create to inclusive space for all bodies, especially for students of color. In the last few decades, artists have worked hard to include resonant stories not always heard in the dominant culture. Including that process into the high school classroom seems to be a more recent development. As artists and educators we can explore additional approaches and practices to uplift and honor all stories to not only deepen our artistic craft but also broaden our cultural perspective. Join a group warm-up, small group story sharing, deep listening, physical/gestural interpretation of one another's stories, and physical synthesis. While the workshop is designed to be physical in nature, it is purposely accessible to all ability levels.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 209B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Maritza Mercado-Narcisse, Isidore Newman School (LA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Have Better Conversations: Visual Facilitation Basics B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: A picture is worth a thousand words and an experience is worth a thousand pictures. Visual facilitation is both a picture and an experience. It's a product and a process of creating a visual map of a conversation. It's not an easy task to facilitate conversations, especially difficult ones, where there are multiple perspectives and competing ideas. Visual facilitation supports you by making ideas visible to get a group on the same page. It validates participants because they can actually see their voice being captured and visualized. It leads to better decision making because ideas and perspectives are clarified and visible. It creates a "visual memory" and increases comprehension of the topic. And it helps everyone maintain focus and feel included in the conversation. Learn the basics of visual facilitation — listening, drawing, context, layout, content, and how to get started. Improve conversations and create a lasting experience today!
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 209A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Kawai Lai, NAIS
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Hero of His Own Story: Interplay Between Identity and Imagination in Early Childhood Picture Books B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Discuss an art-integrated method to use early childhood literature as a tool to support young children’s exploration of identity. During guided discourse, join an extended curriculum exercise that uses a series of children’s books written by Ezra Jack Keats. Discover activities centered on Keats’ book, The Snowy Day (named one of the 100 most important children’s books of the 20th century by the New York Public Library). After navigating through these activities, leave with tangible teacher resources and ideas for future curriculum building in your classroom.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 204B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Lisa Washington Kuzel and Kristin Smith, University of Chicago Laboratory Schools (IL)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
How Are We Supporting "These" Students to Meet Their Potential? Strategies for Creating Equitable Classrooms B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Get an introduction to Equitable Classrooms, a program successfully used in two different independent schools. The program introduces a systematic process for connecting with students of color, identifying unmet needs, and establishing strategies for academic and social success. Teachers who have used this program feel an increased understanding of and investment in students. It also helps them feel more capable of identifying and responding to the needs of students who were previously hard to reach. Identify criteria for selecting prospective students, how to involve parents, when to exit students from the program, how to effectively utilize data, and strategies to support students. Recognize the importance of focusing on the whole child — not just the academics, the importance of cultural competency and positive racial identity when doing this work, and how to define success and improvement.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 208B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Brian Johnson, The Philadelphia School (PA); Ali Michael, The Race Institute for K-12 Educators
Data Use in Activism: Evidence-based Equity and Justice Programming, Research and Evaluation
I’m the First! Supporting First-Generation College Applicants in an Independent Secondary School Environment B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Specialized support and counseling of first generation college-bound students is an underexplored area for equity and justice work in independent schools. College counselors, school leaders, and teachers should attend this session to learn best practices to promote equity for first generation college-bound students, who are disproportionately students of color. Hear from experienced presenters who are also first generation college attendees as they describe programs they have designed and implemented, successes and challenges, and research that supports their approaches. Furthermore, this presentation hopes to shed light on the educational journeys and high school experiences of first-generation students who attend high schools with a strong college-going culture. You will leave the session with resources, strategies, and a persuasive rationale for making first generation student support a priority at their own schools.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 163
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: La’Tonya Rease Miles, UCLA; Gina Liberotti, Loyola High School (CA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
It’s not Islamophobia, it’s Islamoracism: Discovering Teachable Moments in Systemic Hate B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Systemic disenfranchisement of a class of people isn’t simply an irrational fear, but a form of racism. Join us to name this elephant in the room and answer questions plaguing educators: How can I teach a culturally competent curriculum on Islam/Muslims that doesn’t rely on monoliths without apologizing for terrorism? What are some projects I can engage in with students/adults to enable understanding of the diversity in Muslim identity while protecting those with Islamic affinity from being forced into becoming default representatives? How do I respond to Islamophobia and/or ignorance about Islam and facilitate teachable moments for young people and colleagues around this issue? Dean of Equity and Inclusion Kalyan Balaven is a former Imam, Islamic hip-hop artist, and viral author on topics ranging from Islamophobia to scathing critiques of Saudi Arabia.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 203A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Kalyan Balaven, The Athenian School (CA)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Lessons for Discussions with the White Kids During Affinity Time in an Elementary School B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Discuss our affinity group monthly newsletter and the lessons that happen during affinity group time at our PK-6 elementary school. Review handouts and lesson plans from the school year. Lesson plans are used for both students of color doing affinity group work and white students doing identity work during meeting time. Take home newsletters used as conversation starters and guiding questions. These are written by the Diversity Steering Committee and the assistant head of school as a resource for the primarily white teachers who are leading the mostly white students during affinity group time. Also get lesson plans that various teachers of color have used in affinity groups. BBN uses race-based affinity groups.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 207A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Elizabeth Brown, Buckingham Browne & Nichols School (MA)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Mirror Texts and Window Books: Does Your Classroom Library Have a Diversity Gap? B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: What if we could embrace children of color with mirror texts, and provide white children with window books? At the preschool age a child’s identity and how she views others begins to solidify. Topics of race and culture must be intentional and approached with a sense of urgency, even with our youngest learners. Explore the use of multicultural literature and classroom practices to openly acknowledge, discuss, and value differences. Examine texts and images to learn how to identify harmful stereotypes, descriptions, and narratives. Share vignettes from a kindergarten experience that promote cultural awareness, envelop empathy, and nurture pride in young learners.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 203B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Maria Blackburn, Providence Day School (NC)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Recruiting, Retaining, and Recognizing Young Faculty of Color B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: While we have long known that students of color benefit from having teachers who look like them, new research indicates that white students benefit from having teachers of color as well. Although independent schools are making great strides in retaining students of color, faculty of color numbers lag as a result of poor recruitment and retention efforts. Learn from our updated interviews with faculty, placement agencies, administrators, and alumnae/i of color. Analyze qualitative and quantitative findings to consider what works and what does not. Take time to dialogue with colleagues.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 204A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Ashley Bradley, The Meadowbrook School of Weston (MA); Brandon Jacobs, The Hill School (PA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Schoolwide Social Justice Integration Across Ages 2-13: Lessons from a Work in Progress B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: What does it take to initiate a schoolwide commitment to social justice? Discover our collaborative process and approach when working with teachers from pre-k through middle school to identify and develop age-appropriate lessons around social justice concepts. Engage in an interactive exercise that challenges you to identify the developmental ages when children understand specific concepts about race, identity, class, etc. Share our process of identifying when children are ready to understand specific social justice concepts. Through this process, we established a common language and recorded the trends, inconsistencies, and challenges schoolwide. This is a work in process, as our progressive independent school has embarked on this journey during the past three years. Hear lessons learned and find inspiration to initiate a schoolwide conversation about social justice in the classroom. Depart with tangible resources designed to stimulate reflection and action leading to community-wide commitment to change.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 210C
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Millie Cartagena, Gee Roldan, and Joan Brodsky Schur, City and Country School (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Sitting with Whiteness: Exploring the White Experience and the White Effect B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: What does whiteness mean? How does your skin color affect your experiences and the experience of those around you? How can you move from white fragility to allyship? How can white affinity groups serve the larger purpose for antiracist work? Explore our whiteness and the unintentional errors white allies often make. Work on deeply evaluating how well-intentioned white people play into the system of oppression, and why it's imperative to lean into the discomfort of this journey.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 207D
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Dana Gonzalez, Viewpoint School (CA)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Strength in Numbers: A Team Approach to Multicultural Affairs and Community Development B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Outline, explain, clarify, model, and get data to help your school create and transform you multicultural office. Hear how our school decided to make the change from a single multicultural director to a team approach. Delve into the three major categories of our focus and share our successes and failures in our first year as a team. If your school faces adversity or has teachers and administrators who are hesitant to create a diversity office or team, then join us to get clear detail and outlines on how to make the transformation. Diversity work is challenging, but the more individuals you rally together for a cause the better!
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 210A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Mark Gafur and Jared Rodriguez, St. John's Preparatory School (MA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Tear Down the Wall! Building Alliances for Racial and Educational Justice Across the Public/Private Divide B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: People of color and antiracist allies in independent schools, build your capacity to advance racial and educational justice through engagement in local and national politics and alliance building with public school educators and activists. Join a facilitated dialogue between leaders in public and independent schools to examine education privatization policies at the national and local levels, consider the relevance of those policies to people of color in independent schools, and generate concrete action steps for engaging in site-based and community activism in alliance with public school advocates and educators. Leave with insights into the ways public policy shapes our professional experiences in independent schools; critical awareness about points of convergence and conflict among the analyses and approaches of leaders working to advance racial and educational justice through school and educational policy; and strategies and practices for leveraging privileged positionalities to engage with colleagues and students across education sectors in the pursuit of racial and educational justice.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 210B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Sarah Rodriguez, Chadwick School (CA); Christopher Thinnes, Wesley School (CA)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
The Case for Emotional Emancipation Part-2 B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Part 2 of The Case for Emotional Emancipation provides an opportunity to experience Emotional Emancipation Circles and witness the power of this and other initiatives that advance emotional emancipation from the lies of White superiority and Black inferiority developed by Community Healing Network in collaboration with the Association of Black Psychologists.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 204C
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Cheryl Grills, Loyola Marymount University Los Angeles
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
The Wellbriety Movement: 4 Gifts of the Sacred Hoop B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Don Coyhis and J. Carlos Rivera will introduce the concept of Wellbriety as balance and connection to the natural laws that create healing within the native community. Culturally based tools are discussed as a way for changing families, addressing domestic violence, substance use disorders and other underlying issues that stem from trauma. A combination of immense losses and traumatic events that have perpetrated an entire culture need healing as natives across the nation are encouraged to seek to reinstate cultural ways, language and sacred traditions. The unfortunate consequences of trauma include not believing you have a future, difficulties within families and a distrust of the outside world. This is passed down through direct parent-child interactions and also through interactions with extended family and the community. Healing will take place through application of cultural and spiritual knowledge. Mr. Coyhis and Mr. Rivera will incorporate the story of the Sacred Hoop of 100 Eagle Feathers, including how the Sacred Hoop was born from a vision and the 4 gifts that were placed into the Sacred Hoop by a group of traditional multicultural Elders from the 4 Directions.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 204C
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Don Coyhis and J. Carlos Rivera, White Bison, Inc.
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Toward a New Periphery: Theoretical Futures of Diversity Studies B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: If you are knowledgeable about the theories that have driven diversity studies and you have a grasp of critical race theory and intersectionality, privilege, age, physical abilities, and sexual/affectional orientations, then you are ready to explore the next iteration of powerful theories that challenge and go beyond our understandings of diversity studies. After all, theory is the right hand of our lived diversity praxis; theory proves a true locus of power and agency in diversity studies. Because we all live in postcolonial societies, which are the fundamental modern origin of identity challenges, constructs, and conflicts worldwide, opportunities abound to gain new transnational insights. What are emerging next practices in diversity studies theory? Using wide interpretive lenses, examine key theories that have largely gone missing from traditional approaches, including art history in the politics of representation, postcoloniality, colonial domination, hegemony and the idea of complicity, postmodernism, the matrix of domination, and film studies.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 202A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: John Aden, Canterbury School (IN)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
You're So Vain: Personal Identity Exploration as a Foundation for Building a More Inclusive Classroom B Thursday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Uncover how you can create a more inclusive classroom through the exploration of personal identity with students. Draw on the varied experiences of a middle school social studies teacher who created a two-week introductory unit that guides students to thinking critically about who they are, how they know who they are, and how individuals and groups create their identity. By using personal identity as an introduction to a class, you can foster an environment where students can take into account their own identities, as well as others', and the pros and cons of those interactions. Through these understandings, students can thoughtfully question and challenge multiple perspectives for bias and inequity. Engage in interactive and hands-on activities to help put into practice what you learn.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 210D
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Stephanie Tellis, The Park School of Baltimore (MD)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
“Diversity” in the Literary Canon: Asian Representation in the Black/White Paradigm of Race C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: The black/white paradigm of racial inequality in the U.S. has reified a notion of diversity that excludes Asian texts from the literary canon. The College Board’s list of representative authors for the AP curriculum is overwhelmingly composed of white authors, and the few minority voices predominantly belong to black writers like Toni Morrison, James Baldwin, Richard Wright, and Langston Hughes. The problem with this is that our choices of literary texts produce and reproduce ideas of relevancy in discussions of racial oppression. By internalizing the black/white paradigm and structuring our discourse of diversity in literature accordingly, we teachers perpetuate the invisibility of Asian narratives, muting the struggles of Asian Americans. Examine the lack of Asian representation in the canon and critique the practice of teaching diversity through texts that reify the black/white binary.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 210D
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Christine Chun, Black Pine Circle School (CA); Alison Park, Blink Consulting; Tim Rosenwong, Pacific Ridge School (CA); Cheryl Ting, Redwood Day School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
5, 10, 15 Minutes: Simple Activities to Practice & Promote Cultural Competency C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: Advancement of equity and justice now and in every generation requires building empathy and raising cultural competency both within and beyond the walls of our institutions. Major initiatives and trainings are important, but the path toward fulfilling this dream to build and sustain inclusive school communities should also include small, intentional steps woven into our daily routines and school culture. Join this practical, hands-on workshop to learn a variety of 5-, 10-, and 15-minute activities you can quickly implement at your own school to “fill the gaps” and provide continuous expansion of cultural knowledge and resources. Strive to reach multiple generations with a mix of student, faculty, trustee, parent, and family-centric activities. Take home a toolkit of meaningful, effective, quick-to-implement activities that optimize pockets of time, raise the cultural competency of their entire population, and add to the body of knowledge you need to create a more equitable and just school community.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 207A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Gabrielle Hernan, Boulder Country Day School (CO); Veronica Johns-Richardson, St. Margaret's Episcopal School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
All About the Strategy: Engaging Your Board to Be an Effective Equity and Inclusion Leader C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: Sometimes meeting your equity and inclusion goals means communicating different strategies for those goals with different constituency groups. While teachers and students may be swayed by the moral augments for inclusion, parents and trustees are often more interested in the deliverable skills associated with cultural competency. Learn how to effectively frame your goals for equity and inclusion to get buy-in from your whole school community.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 203A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Stephanie Bramlett, St. Luke's School (CT)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Asleep to WOKE: Impact of White Racial Identity on Colleagues of Color in the Workplace C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: Racial anxiety and a limited understanding of whiteness and White identity development impacts White people. These concepts can negatively contribute to White people’s social interactions with People of Color in the workplace. Racial stress, often experienced after a racial microaggression has been delivered, impacts People of Color in the workplace. The emotional overload that takes place during, and sometimes before and after racial interactions, can affect workplace productivity and school climate. Scholars call upon educators to become more racially literate (Godsil & Goodale, 2013; Michael, 2015; Stevenson, 2014). This workshop hopes to shed light on the cognitive, behavioral, and emotional skill sets needed to navigate racial dialogues between people of diverse racial-ethnic backgrounds. The facilitators will utilize their collective knowledge of, and experiences with, racial identity development models with the power of personal storytelling and dramatization to create a space where self-reflection leads to personal agency.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 204C
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Sandra “Chap” Chapman, Little Red School House & Elisabeth Irwin School (LREI) (NY)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Assault with a Deadly Curriculum: Identifying and Resolving Microaggressions Hidden in Your Curriculum C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: Race- and ethnicity-based microaggressions are an insidious form of racism that has a subtle presence but a major impact on the overall well-being of those who experience them. This is especially true regarding the academic success and performance of students. As educators, many of us often take for granted the just nature of information, and sometimes hold it impervious to the influences of systematic racism. Develop an instinctive eye for identifying the plethora of microaggressions present throughout typical curricula; gain a better understanding of how these very specific microaggressions impact a learner’s identity; recognize the potentially negative effects on a cognitive, social, and emotional level; and see how the consistent exposure to microaggressions can stifle motivation. Take home remedies for correcting these microaggressions and practical tools for giving our students “voice” for their experience with microaggressions.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 209B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Jeffery Menzise, Morgan State University's Institute for Urban Research; Maati Wafford, Barrie School (MD)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Can We Talk? Getting Explicit About Implicit Bias C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: Cross-cultural conversations develop self-awareness of one’s own culturally limited interpretative frameworks and how associated biases and prejudices impact all of our exchanges with others. Awareness alone is rarely effective for reducing unconscious bias. Even the most well intentioned individuals fail to suppress their automatic stereotypes and prejudices all of the time. A relational approach fosters inclusion by encouraging the sharing of information and perspectives. Discuss the Faculty/Staff Discussion Group at Gill St. Bernard's School and how these discussions are used to share experiences, provide a space to lean into areas of discomfort, and confront our personal biases — both implicit and explicit.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 202B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Tracey Barrett, Gill St. Bernard's School (NJ)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Cultural Competency Training for Faculty and Staff: Starting Courageous Conversations at Your School C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: Journey through the planning and implementation of voluntary courageous conversation at an independent school. Discover how one school uses these conversations as a tool to help faculty practice their skills around discussing concepts such as implicit bias, privilege, microaggressions, the importance of language, heteronormativity, and the danger of a single story, among other topics. Gain a deeper understanding of what works in facilitating these difficult conversations and where challenges might arise. Review samples of the curriculum and engage in different activities that occur in the courageous conversations. Follow a first step taken by this K-12 school to ensure the work of equity and justice is a community initiative, as opposed to the work of only the director of diversity.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 202A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Diana Artis and Eva Owstrowky, The Pingry School (NJ)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Deep Diversity: How Brain Science Advances — and Challenges — Racial Justice Education C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: Use this award-winning training process to explore how predominant the unconscious mind is in human interactions, especially related to the perpetuation of racism and Islamophobia. Through a methodology developed over two decades and independently tested, learn how to advance racial justice education through the integration of mind sciences, critical for success in the current xenophobic climate. As a racial justice educator, Shakil Choudhury, spent the first decade of his work life studying antiracism and the second decade exploring psychology. His personal story as an activist who suffered burnout helps outline both the strengths and failures of traditional approaches to teaching about power and privilege. Find out how to avoid common activist traps that unwittingly support oppression, cynicism, and burnout. Study key workshop design factors that reduce resistance and backlash by learners, especially by those with the most privilege. Draw on ideas from Choudhury’s new book, Deep Diversity: Overcoming Us vs. Them.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 163
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Shakil Choudhury, Anima Leadership
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Diversifying the English Canon: Building Community and Context for Diverse Texts C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: The focus on representation has been integral to the thoughtful additions of non-Eurocentric perspectives to the English curriculum. However, with such efforts, English teachers need to become aware of the danger of tokenizing these texts, further engendering their exceptionalism and otherness in the English canon. Study a framework for how to engage students with novels, short stories, and poems that may be unfamiliar to them in cultural perspective, subject matter, and structure. Discuss strategies for how to de-center European norms for narrative and lyric forms. Take home various methods to engage your departments in conversations about diverse texts that suit your curricular needs and environment.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 208B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Brigitte Leschhorn and Celeste Prince, Mary Institute and St. Louis Country Day School (MO)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Diversity and Tech as Innovation C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: As devices and connected lives become a greater part of schools, it is important for all constituents to consider how technology can serve the mission of the school. Efforts to increase diversity and equity are moving quickly from the periphery to somewhere close to the heart of what a school does and wants to do. Leadership at schools supports both technology and diversity departments, but may not feel knowledgeable in either. Teachers can see the initiatives of each department as a diversion from the main goals of a classroom, but students may be more facile with both than previous generations while parents may be resources to both departments. Self-starters without clear portfolios often lead these departments. Practitioners are often isolated at their schools and have to seek out conferences and other gatherings to grow professionally. Opportunities for cooperation, collaboration, and innovation between the two departments should yield invaluable outcomes for the school community. This approach also suggests ways in which all departments can better serve the mission of a school.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 207C
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Erika Eason, Maret School (DC); Samantha Fletcher, St. Patrick's Episcopal Day School (DC); Saber Khan, The Browning School (NY); Tony Tanael, Convent of the Sacred Heart (NY)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Inner-Viewing: Exploration of Intersectionality to Inspire Action C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: In this workshop, participants will learn how our complex intersectionality of identity can be woven into existing curriculum to create meaningful connections for young learners. Relevant lesson plans -- informed by research, practice, and the four core goals of anti-bias education -- will be shared. These lessons focus on an “inner-view” approach to help students better understand and affirm the spectrum of their identities. The various lessons demonstrate how to apply a social justice lens while incorporating multiple disciplines -- including language arts, social studies, science, performing arts, and math. Additionally, an interdisciplinary multicultural planning tool will be shared in support of lesson planning. You’ll leave this workshop with some ideas and examples about how social justice thinking will inspire activism and allyship.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 153
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Sandi Crozier, Wildwood School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Inside the Box: Understanding the Invisibility of Middle Eastern Communities C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: Middle Eastern and North African individuals virtually do not exist according to census data. Categorized as white, these communities are without official representation, and by extension, without a voice. While anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant rhetoric remains prevalent, a census category could be used as a tool to oppress rather than support the communities that need it most. Explore the relationship between the lack of representation and abundance of misrepresentation surrounding Middle Eastern and North African individuals, and the impacts this has on their communities and society as a whole. Get training in how to create spaces for representation through self-empathy, accepting others, accurate listening, and perspective taking (Rogers, 1982). Through interactive discussion, simulations, and evidenced-based practice, get equipped with the tools necessary to cultivate a more inclusive educational environment for a traditionally marginalized group of students.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 207B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Nelly Kaakaty, The Episcopal School of Dallas (TX)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Language, Labels, and Power: The Intersection of “LD” and Students of Color in Independent Schools C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: Challenge your thinking around students of color labeled “learning disabled.” Raise your awareness of how students of color can be doubly affected in the federal special education system and consider how one independent school, established for students with learning differences, educates students, including students of color. Explore scientific, historical, and political voices in special education, including a discussion of civil rights legislation as an inspiration for disability rights legislation. Hear about our educational setting where differences such as ADHD and dyslexia are seen as engines of innovative thinking and catalysts for empowering students of color and all students with differences.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Robert Lane, Christopher Lanier, and Yvette Shepard, Lab School of Washington (DC)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Of Our Spiritual Strivings: Reconsidering Du Bois, the Talented 10th, and the Divine Nine C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: People of color generally undergo two life-altering experiences: the moment they realize they’re a person of color, and subsequently realizing it's a problem. The “sunken place” metaphorically symbolizes the frustration of people who feel more marginalized now than ever before. In the early 20th century, scholar W.E.B. Du Bois outlined this sunken place concept in his seminal work, The Souls of Black Folk. Du Bois, himself a member of a black Greek letter organization (BGLO), represented the class of educated Blacks known as the talented 10th: advocates who fought for equal rights. Collectively referred to as the Divine Nine, BGLOs have relied on education as the key to resisting the sunken place — combatting racism and stereotypes, achieving equality, and overcoming oppression — and they have played an integral part in supporting and nurturing people of color for more than 100 years. How can we embrace the history and legacy of the talented 10th and the Divine Nine to support people of color as they pursue strategies for success and leadership in independent school spaces that were not designed for them?
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 210B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Shanelle Robinson, Friends Academy (NY); Antonio Williams, William Penn Charter School (PA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
OK, Ladies, Now Let's Get in Formation! Enhancing Ethnic Identity Development of African-American Adolescent Girls C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: The goal of this presentation is to increase knowledge about ethnic identity development in African American (AA) female students and to explore how academic and social environments directly impact students' overall health and psychological well being. This workshop will provide information about ethnic identity development theories and empirical studies which explore the correlation between ethnic identity development and academic achievement and overall well being. Participants will learn how to integrate this knowledge into their pedagogical approaches and incorporate curricula that 1) improves ethnic identity development, 2) reduces risk factors, poor self-concept, and negative self-defeating behaviors and 3) increases positive outcomes for AA female students. This presentation will provide attendees an opportunity to learn more about Ethnic Identity Development in AA female students, how it impacts their academic performance, and explore new ways to integrate this knowledge into their pedagogical approach in the classroom.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 204B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: LaNaadrian Easterling, La Jolla Country Day School (CA)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Power in Numbers: How Students Organized a March Against the Muslim Ban (with Teacher Facilitation) C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: After the Muslim ban executive order was issued, fifth and sixth grade Sequoyah School students were buzzing about what had happened. We put aside our planned lessons and opened it up for discussion. Students examined the text of the executive order in both math and reading classes, applying their understanding of ratios and percentages as well as reading strategies. They analyzed numerical and textual data in order to generate opinions. Many students expressed interest in taking action in response to their findings, so they generated actions of resistance, including a march to City Hall. Students managed all facets of the march, from writing press releases to planning the route. They made signs and chants expressing their hopes for diversity and inclusivity, in line with Sequoyah's values. Learn concrete steps you can take to empower and engage students in activism in your own classes. Join this in-depth case study of our unit and get a framework for enacting social justice education in your classroom.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 208A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Cynthia Lee and Chad Robertson, Sequoyah School (CA)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Power of Posse: Creating Circles of Empowerment for Educational Leaders of Color C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: More than 20 years ago with funds from the Rockefeller Brothers Fund (RBF), undergraduates of color from 25 colleges were offered the opportunity collaborate with their peers and prepare to be public school teachers. Support was offered for summer internships, and conferences were organized to create a strong cohort and teach recipients how to apply to graduate school. In addition, tuition support was provided for advanced study. What is a person to do when seeking a cohort or posse without the financial backing of a "Robber Baron?" Learn about the formal and informal connections among RBF fellows and consider what resources exist in your corner of the world to create your own cohort or posse. Established in 1992, a few years after the well know Posse Foundation, the now defunct RBF Fellowship for Aspiring Teachers of Color supported hundreds of teachers of color as they entered the teaching profession. Hear from three fellows about how this opportunity allowed them to flourish and how they "pay it forward" by supporting other young college students and faculty in their development.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 210C
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Julian Braxton, Winsor School (MA); Nadirah Moreland, National Cathedral School (DC); Teresa Rodriguez, Boston Collegiate Charter School (MA)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Safe Places to Take Risk, Develop Self, and Build Community: Bank Street's KOC Program (K-8) C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: Experience firsthand healthy activities we do with children of color in affinity spaces, led by the educators of color who facilitate and create this curriculum. Since 1994, Bank Street School for Children has pioneered creating affinity spaces to develop healthy racial identity starting as young as first grade and going through eighth grade. The program's goals are to develop and support racial literacy and identity ; acknowledge and bridge the cultural gap; give students the opportunity to talk about their identity for their own needs rather than the needs of the community; give students the chance to be in a majority setting; and create leadership opportunities for students. Over this eight-year program, children of color are really comfortable sharing who they are and become their own advocates in our community and the world.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 203B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Coy Dailey, Ricky Forde, Jose Guzman, and Maria Richa, Bank Street School for Children (NY)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Service Learning for Middle School: Authentic Cultural Experiences That Build Empathy and Shape Future Leaders C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: Find out how a service learning immersion trip to Arizona benefitted middle school students with a transformative experience and empowered them to return as change agents. In partnership with the Me to WE organization, students from The Willows Community School learned about local environmental and immigration issues and how surrounding "border towns” address the challenges and hardships each face. By engaging with peers from a local K-8 school in Nogales, interviewing U.S. Border Patrol agents, seeing and touching the border fence between the U.S. and Mexico, participating in cultural and environmental projects and presentations, and building physical structures to further the sustainability of the community, students gained firsthand experiences that challenged them to reflect both emotionally and intellectually in racial and social justice issues and gained skills to make informed decisions and tools to combat these matters in their local communities back home.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 207D
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Christina Kim and Elizabeth Stocksdale, The Willows Community School (CA)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Supporting Safety and Inclusion for LGPQ-TI Students, Families, and Colleagues C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: Learn methods to develop and support safe and inclusive communities for lesbian, gay, pansexual, queer, transgender, and intersex people. Creating truly inclusive, affirming, and healthy environments for LGPQ-TI people requires intentionality and commitment from an entire community, organization, or school. Examine basic concepts, vocabulary, and skills necessary to provide safe and inclusive support to LGPQ-TI (and other orientation and gender nonconforming) students, families, and colleagues in independent schools and beyond. Interactively explore ways to challenge our own internalized heterosexism and cisgeneerism to better serve as allies for social justice and change.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Natalie Thoreson, inVision Consulting
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
The Room Where It Happens: Engaging Senior Administrators in Dialogue Around Social Justice C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: The reality that the work of equity and inclusion needs to include the voices at the top is insurmountable. Therefore, senior administrators must engage in their own work where they not only see themselves but also can be imperfect and make mistakes in a space that provides the opportunity to grow and realize the depth and value of equity and inclusion work. Find out how we have engaged administration in this realization through their own work and created an environment where proactive discussions and practices are advancing and leading to the implementation of institutional changes. Administrators are especially encouraged to join us and participate as we lean into the challenging conversations necessary to address the equitable and inclusive space needed in all of our schools.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 209A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Roderick Fludd, Shorecrest Preparatory School (FL); Patricia Matos, Greenwich Country Day School (CT)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Think Your School Is Committed to a Diverse Faculty? Take the Test and Find Out C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: Independent schools have long wrestled with identifying and recruiting diverse faculty. Some schools have had success, but the overwhelming majority continue to struggle and are unaware of why. Over the years, many have offered their opinion and speculation as to the root causes, but little research has been conducted to specifically examine the issue. Join us to discover why some schools are more successful than others based on three years of research specifically focused on diversity recruitment in independent schools. Its content is informed by more than 150 returned surveys exploring the practice, policies, and people involved in faculty recruitment. Explore the six keys areas of successful diversity recruitment and what is required for change. Take the survey to assess the strengths and weaknesses of your school’s diversity recruitment program. Leave with proven tips and strategies for success.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 210A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Warren Reid, NEMNET Minority Recruitment
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Transitioning Is the Hardest Part: Preparing Middle and High School Students of Color to Thrive C Thursday, November 30,
3:45 PM-4:45 PM
  • Summary: You have a great group of newly admitted students of color, now what? Uncover strategies to successfully implement transition programming for students of color in the months before they begin school. Find out what topics to tackle as they relate to social, academic, socioeconomic, and identity pressures that students will likely experience in independent school settings. Learn about ways to introduce the material to be engaging and empowering — and not overwhelming for new students.
  • Block: C (Thursday, November 30, 3:45 PM-4:45 PM)
  • Room number: 204A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Kaela Farrise, Independent School Alliance for Minority Affairs
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
“We Are the Dark Spectrum on Parade:” Teaching African-American Literature in Our New Century D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: What, at this point, is African-American literature about? Can we continue to use the same (old) books to teach increasingly diverse communities about this ever more complicated subject? How has the voice of African-American literature changed in the 21st century, and how might/will that voice change as we look to an unpredictable future? What new voices are emerging in African-American literature to address these questions? Consider how we can and should evolve our curricula as we talk about authors such as Ta-Nehisi Coates, Margo Jefferson, Jesmyn Ward, Paul Beatty, Colson Whitehead, and others, to identify emergent and established voices in this discourse. Discuss what seem to be the emerging contours of contemporary African-American Literature, and examine those contours within the African-American literary and intellectual tradition.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 203A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: William Fisher, The Dalton School (NY)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Coloring Outside the Box: An Antibias Approach for Young Children D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: Our understanding of an antibias approach is, “Instilling in children love and respect for others that is stronger than hate and prejudice.” Antibias teaching in early elementary classrooms requires critical thinking and problem solving by both adults and children. Many schools have an overarching goal to create a climate of positive self and group identity development, through which every child will achieve their fullest potential. We at The Children’s School have identified an antibias approach with young children and developed curriculum with a social justice overlay. Hear how we discuss biases related to physical abilities and characteristics, gender, race and ethnicity, and family structure and socioeconomic class with first graders. Get charged up and walk away with useful activities, age-appropriate language, and a plethora of children's literature to support your challenges and opportunities when approaching biases with young children. What may seem difficult will become necessary and powerful in teaching our youngest learners.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 209B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Alison Armbrecht, Maryann Jernigan, Wilma Pollard, Melissa Scott, and Amanda Thwaits, The Children's School (GA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
De-centering Whiteness in Upper School English Classrooms D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: In an increasingly polarizing time marked both by uncertainty and increased visibility for POC figures, what responsibilities and opportunities do we have as contemporary educators to cultivate curriculum, pedagogy, and classroom environments that intentionally and meaningfully attend to our increasingly diverse student populations? Discard the nontransformative desire to merely “diversify” curriculum while still reinforcing Eurocentricity as default. Instead adopt a complete reimagining of the humanities with whiteness and Western civilization representative of one perspective out of many, if not an optional addition. Join us to consider text selection, lenses of analysis, and modes of critique.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 207D
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Charlene Engle, High Tech High School Chula Vista (CA); Mark Pangilinan, Chadwick School (CA); Meg Goldner Rabinowitz, Germantown Friends School (PA)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Decolonizing Romance and the Beauty Ideal: Redefining Social Capital for Our Students D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: “Her beauty cannot be measured with standards of a colonized mind.” — Meshelle Ndegeocello. Social media. Photoshop. Pornography. Generation Z is the most image-centric generation of our time. Body image plays a hypersensitive role in the life of this vulnerable population. It impacts their emotional well-being and physical health, and dictates social status. The “beauty ideal” marginalizes those who do not meet it and automatically oppresses students of color when body image privilege is defined by colonized standards and best exemplified by the Barbie Doll: white-skinned, thin, round eyes, and straight hair. These standards systemically disadvantage students of color of all genders and impact romance, self-esteem, diet, and hookup culture. This system of oppression sexualizes, exotifies, and fetishizes students of color. Examine this type of oppression through a health and social-emotional lens. Unpack the evolutionary basis for body types, factors that influence self-image, and the impacts of body dissatisfaction.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 204A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Justine Fonte, The Dalton School (NY)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Diversity Is Not the Goal: Exploring Transformational Principles in the Quest for Racial Justice D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: How in the world did a 1st-generation Iranian immigrant of Jewish and Muslim heritage and a Southern-born and bred black Baptist preacher become family and allies in the struggle for racial justice? Starting with their personal history, Eric Dozier and Homa Tavangar will explore how the principles that unite them can be translated into daily practices and help lead to the transformation of perspectives and culture. This session draws on wisdom gleaned from Buddhism, the Baha’i Faith, African-American gospel song traditions, global citizenship education, and neuroscience. Experiential, interactive, musical and inspiring, this session will also be practical. Participants will take away innovative strategies to go beyond building diversity to building relationships. Learn how to apply these tools across departments, grades and types of schools.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 203B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Eric Dozier, Episcopal School of Nashville (TN); Homa Tavangar, Author and Global Education Adviser
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Exploring Intersectional Safe Spaces: Black and Queer in Independent Day Schools D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: How do we as black, queer men find and create spaces that will allow our intersectional identities to thrive? As we know from research and our personal experiences, to feel comfortable and flourish all faculty need spaces that affirm and validate their identities. Explore how the creation and maintenance of these spaces can help ensure that black, queer flourish in our institutions. Allies, take this opportunity to discuss how you can partner with colleagues of color to maintain these spaces. Collectively identify existing spaces in your school and use crosstalk to share how these spaces originated. Also discuss the effects of the absence of these spaces on faculty of color. Take away strategies for working with fellow colleagues and administration to ensure the existence of these spaces moving forward.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 210D
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Brandon Woods, Catlin Gable (OR); Stephen Wright, Latin School of Chicago (IL)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
From the Classroom to the Barrio: Expanding the Classroom Through Community Service D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: Are you eager to expand classroom learning into the community at large? Not quite sure how to make it happen? By means of a unique application of the components of the design thinking model, the Latin American Perspectives Spanish class students at The Hockaday School utilize language skills to connect with members of a senior center in a predominantly Latino neighborhood in West Dallas. Students develop empathy and a greater understanding for diversity and social privileges, make an impact in the community through collaboration, and think in terms of “what the community needs vs. what I think they should have.” Explore relevant ways to introduce service learning into your classroom environment, tools to actively engage in cross-divisional collaboration, and best practices to plan action steps and heighten student engagement.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 207A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Mariana Mariel, The Hockaday School (TX)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Honey, I “Woke” The Kids: Injecting Culturally Relevant Material into the Spanish Classroom D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: Participate in specific lessons and learn how personal background information can be used to build the student’s understanding of social justice, equity, and microaggressions. Gain strategies on how to humanize the “other” to your students by drawing comparisons between them and making connections between them. Join activities regarding Latinx identity, immigration, racial jokes and stereotypes, and current events. Investigate examples such as Bolivia’s Water War, Salvadoran Civil War, past and current U.S. immigration policies, and others.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 209A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Silvia Salazar, Crossroads School (CA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
How Might We Support High School Students of Asian Descent: A Design Thinking Approach D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: Using design thinking to address real world situations, engage in problem solving related to formation of an affinity group for students of Asian descent at the high school level. In this generative format for a workshop, learn from colleagues with varying levels of experience while working together toward possible solutions and undergoing the design thinking process. Focus on the issue of meeting the needs of a diverse group of students at the high school level, which includes Asian Americans, international students, and transracial adoptees. Hear from upper school faculty members who have been working with students interested in developing this affinity group about their work thus far. Go through stages of design thinking in an effort to create a space for creativity, information sharing, and collaboration toward a shared goal.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 204B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Angela Balcita, Rommel Loria, and Christine Tillman, The Park School of Baltimore (MD)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
I Am Who I Am, Right? D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: Black girl magic is quite au courant, and yet black girls are still three times more likely to be expelled from school than their white counterparts — and for ethnically-charged reasons such as wearing their hair natural, expressing their opinion passionately, or being economically challenged. Within our community, we celebrate Michelle Obama as poised, principled, and glamorous. Yet we perceive other poised, principled, and glamorous women like Zoe Saldana or Lisa Bonnet as being “too white, or not black enough.” In a world of Instagram, celebrity, and racial divide, how are our black girls and women strategically establishing a sense of self, empowerment, and worth? As members of a progressive educational community, how are we bringing our prejudices and bias into the classroom, conferences with parents, collaborations with colleagues, and our own lives? Take a look at how a sense of personal identity and empowerment is rooted within and the positive impact that mind, body, and spirit wellness can have on treading this personal and social path.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 208B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Lisa (Kelly) Quattlebaum, The Little School Project (PA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
In the World, but Not of It: Creating Origin Stories as Identity Development D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: In the late 1930s, Herman Blount claimed that he communicated with aliens from Saturn who told him that the world was chaotic and he needed to leave college to concentrate on his music. Herman Blount changed his name to Sun Ra and said: "I left everything to be me, ‘cause I knew I was not like them...I’m alone on this planet.” We all bring unique experiences, talents, and backgrounds to our respective independent schools, but there might be times when we feel like the culture of our institutions are alien to us. Through the lens of Sun Ra and Afrofuturism, we will discuss how we can identify our own origin stories and create curricular opportunities for our students to do the same.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 162
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Naa-Norley Adom, Durham Academy (NC)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
International Competence and Inclusivity: Ambitious Adaptive Change Toward Addressing Diversity D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: Atlanta International School identifies mutual understanding and respect in a diverse community as a core value. As a full IB language immersion, multi-age, multirace, and multinational school with students from 90 countries speaking more than 60 languages, inclusivity and intercultural competence are two ambitious strategic priorities. Identifying the level of intercultural competence for the teachers and administrators through the Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI), understanding what this looks like in a school, and developing strategies to raise awareness and promote the growth of intercultural competence in teachers, leaders, and students form part of the journey in which the school is now immersed. It is a complex, personal, and sometimes messy process. Foresake the messiness and you may miss the magic! Gain a basic understanding of intercultural competence as a basis for inclusivity and share our professional development failures and successes.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 210A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Ann Straub, Council of International Schools; Tambi Tyler, Atlanta International School (GA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Is It Getting Better? Exploring #BlackLivesMatter and the Civil Right Movement with Young People D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: In this interactive workshop, participants will gain awareness, language, and skills for facilitating discussions that help young people make the connection between their own self awareness and bias, the need for racial justice movements, and social activism. We will explore multimedia resources and primary accounts and grapple with how to respond to the range of information and graphic images that young people encounter. Participants will act as learners and teachers by engaging in small group discussions and brainstorming how to adapt these materials and lessons to be developmentally appropriate for the children in their lives.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 163
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Mellisha Culpepper and Rebecca Yacono, Shady Hill School (MA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Joyful Noise: Integrating Diversity and Social Justice Work into the Everyday Life of a School D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: The Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart Upper School has a Diversity and Social Justice Team that empowers our community to joyfully take collective ownership of equity and justice work. We begin with the premise of “everyone is diverse” and then push deeper into inclusion and action. Recognizing that teachers need to have buy-in for equity work to be sustainable, we designed a professional development workshop to instill faculty commitment to windows and mirrors. Teachers are introduced to the NAIS cultural identifiers, reflect on their own myriad identifiers, and then receive a collection of identifiers to represent the many qualities of a single student. The team has also collaborated on outside-of-the-box programming that helped our community experience the joy of equity and justice work, such as a diversity day connected to the film Belle and an “artivism” day designed to help students find their voice as artists and advocates. Through these dynamic initiatives, the effort in equity and justice remains sustainable because we work collaboratively, always allowing for meaningful windows and mirrors.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 202A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Barbara Beachler, Lauren Brownlee, and Caroline Fitzpatrick, Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart (MD)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Let's Talk About How WE Practice Self-Care D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: Join discussions and activities among panel members from other independent schools, presenters, and participants. Address how educators of color from various types of independent schools (day, boarding, rural, urban/suburban) practice self-care and the steps they take to maintain their identity while being a professional in a predominately white institution. Participate in small-scale movement activities. Role play and share effective methods you have used to strike a balance between your professional and personal life.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 210B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Nola-rae Cronan, Columbus Schools for Girls (OH); Craig Jones, The Wellington School (OH); Jason Sport, Austin Preparatory School (MA); Marcus Ware, Springfield Commonwealth Academy (MA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Measure What Matters: Using Data to Deliver Strategic Diversity, Equity, and Enrollment Goals D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: At Hillbrook, a JK-8 school in the heart of Silicon Valley, we strive to measure our performance on strategic goals. Most schools collect information about the families who are — or want to become — a part of their communities, fewer do anything with the data being collected. Diversity, equity, and inclusivity goals should be strategic goals, and progress requires planning, resources, and tracking. Building a diverse, inclusive school community is critical to Hillbrook living its vision and mission. With the the launch of our new strategic plan, Hillbrook implemented a Diversity Dashboard, parent survey, and innovative board of trustees-driven Inclusivity Task Force, which has facilitated collaboration and progress on our diversity and inclusivity goals. In the past two years, for example, the number of enrolled students of color at Hillbrook has increased 28% and more than half of students applying for admission now identify as students of color. Hear about lessons learned and our ongoing commitment to measure, benchmark, and improve our school’s diversity, equity, and inclusivity efforts.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 202B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Joe Connolly and Angela Yokota, Hillbrook School (CA); Tesha Poe, Castilleja School and Hillbrook School (CA)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Not Like Other Girls: Supporting Positive Identity Development for Girls of Color D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: Given limited role models and underrepresentation of faculty of color in most independent schools, girls of color face a unique set of developmental challenges that require supportive spaces where they can feel affirmed and empowered. Starting in lower school, girls of color are bombarded by subtle social cues and mixed media messages that can make a profound impact on their identity development. Over time, these compounded messages have the potential to inflict negative social, emotional, and psychological impact, leaving students of color particularly susceptible to stereotype threat and internalized racism. Referencing the work of Beverly Daniel Tatum, William Cross, and Emily Style, get an overview of racial identity research and developmental frameworks, while also considering the critical nature of windows and mirrors, representation and reflection. Building on this foundation, explore racial dynamics inherent in your school community, identify opportunities for support, and develop strategies for creating culturally relevant programming that considers social and emotional learning, as well as intersectional identity development for girls of color.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 207B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Chiarna Morton, Dwight School (NY); Jacqueline Nelson, The Hewitt School (NY)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Recruiting Without Bias D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: With student populations at many of our schools growing increasingly diverse, the importance of similarly diverse faculties has never been more critical. Yet, despite new opportunities every year to diversify our schools through hiring, the advances we should be seeing are just not happening. What’s in the way? Is everyone really on board? To better understand the dynamics at play, and the virtual roadblocks in the way, identify key disrupters to the process, and uncover bias in school recruiting processes that school administrators may not even see. Expand your multicultural knowledge as you engage in self-identity experiences. Review recruiting case studies that illustrate the dynamics at play that undermine a well-intentioned but likely flawed process. Engage in a lively and informative session with presenters from a diversity of experiences and perspectives — ranging from experienced independent school educators, to a highly regarded cultural competency professional, to a seasoned recruiter.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 204C
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Princess Bomba, The Wheeler School (RI); Chris Kolovos, Greens Farms Academy (CT); Lisa Lovering, Educator's Ally; Tiffany Taylor Smith, Culture Learning Partners
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Shaping Identity: A Critical Analysis of Black Students’ Experiences in Independent Private Schools D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: Examine the experiences of black students in predominantly white independent private schools in large cities in the West and South. Investigate how black students develop, negotiate, and survive the daily trauma of oppression during this crucial stage of development. In these elite institutions, values and identities are being put forth. Since schools inform identity development for all adolescents, they remain integral in shaping black students’ sense of themselves, of which race and class are salient features of this process. To be clear, in predominantly white independent schools, the intersection of race and class have the potential to compromise developmental processes. These institutions expect black students to conform to white cultural hegemonic standards to achieve academic success. Even still, many families choose to enroll their black students in predominantly white independent schools with hopes and dreams of an academically prosperous future. Thus, it is necessary to understand the place of students of color, particularly those of African descent, as their mere existence challenges the identity of the dominant culture of independent schools.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 207C
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Tina B. Evans, Brentwood School (CA); Devean R. Owens, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
What Happened? And How Do You Make It Right? Using Restorative Justice to Support Diversity D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: At San Francisco Day School we believe all students have the right to learn in a safe, inclusive environment. When mistakes happen, they create opportunities for learning. In order to create a positive, inclusive culture, we use strategies that build on the school’s ethical values, engaging students as positive contributors to their community. Restorative practices allow students to take responsibility for choices and create a space for reconciliation. In addition to supporting a positive school climate and inclusive community, restorative justice aids in the acceptance of cultural differences by focusing on people, the acknowledgement of diverse experiences, and community agreements. Diversity directors work with the upper school head and counselor to create a positive space for problem solving, building empathy, conflict mediation, and reparation. Students learn to repair harm, understand the impact of their actions, and support one another’s learning. Hear from administration, diversity directors, and the school counselor on how they collaboratively use restorative justice to foster inclusion, well-being, and responsibility. Role play and review case studies and sample strategies.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 153
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Ruth Bissell, Betsy Brody, Loren Moye, and Jackie Richards, San Francisco Day School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Where Are My Peeps? Recruiting and Activating Allies in Your Institution D Friday, December 1,
8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Summary: Feel like you are doing the work of social justice and equity all alone at your school? Looking for ways to encourage others to support the work so it becomes OUR rather than YOUR work? If everyone is “holding the diversity flag” – why does it feel so heavy!? Hear experienced diversity practitioners discuss strategies for building institutional buy-in for doing diversity work. What are ways to move past splitting up your to-do list to instilling a sense of ownership and urgency from your colleagues? Recognize the importance of avoiding burnout by focusing on building a team to lead your school toward a vision of a more inclusive and culturally competent community. What happens after the speaker leaves? Where are folks involved when it isn’t a special event? Find out just how to activate others in your school community.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 1, 8:00 AM-9:00 AM)
  • Room number: 210C
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Yvonne Adams, St. Stephens Episcopal School (TX); Toni Williamson, Abington Friends School (PA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Approaches to Building Skill-Based Equity and Inclusion Curricula E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Diversity work in many of our schools happens through the efforts of small groups of committed students and their faculty mentors. These students work to hone their interpersonal skills and broaden their modes of thinking because they are passionate about equity and inclusion. But all of our students need these skills and perspectives so they can best contribute to the workplace and engage their civic responsibilities. Growing our students’ equity skills translates to better thinkers in industry, research, and government. Hear how we have developed skill-based equity and inclusion curricula in two different schools to meet students’ needs on a division-wide level. Get suggestions for building curriculum and leveraging your school’s assets and culture and engage in small-group brainstorming discussions and activities that you can take home to start your own skill-based curricular work. The information in the presentation is geared for middle and upper school educators and administrators.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 152
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Mya Sullivan Rabun Gap, Nacoochee School (GA); Sarah Wilson, Laurel School (OH)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Black Leadership In Schools — #Areyouready? E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: As the landscape of independent school leadership changes from that of a predominantly white space to one which includes people who identify as black across the gender spectrum, the stakes for equitable practices are higher. As we step into this leadership realm and begin to navigate the daily life of schools from the classroom to the administrative table as well as the boardroom, the lenses through which one sees and experiences the school environment shifts and changes. Discuss the concept of black leadership in theory and the manifestation of it in real time by sharing experiences. Share stories of success, tools for navigation, strategies for survival, and methods for self care.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 210C
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Russell Marsh and Orinthia Swindell, Brooklyn Friends School (NY); Eddie Moore, Jr., The Privilege Institute
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Celebrating influential, Famous Latinas in History: A Mixed-Media Project E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: What could be more important than celebrating the accomplishments of our unsung heroines of the world (whether it be politics, social justice, arts, etc.)? Women of color are often found at the bottom of the social hierarchy and are frequently the ones with less privilege. Experience this collaborative mixed-media project that incorporates technology, maker mindset, Spanish language, and visual art. It is intended for middle school-aged students. The project celebrates the accomplishments of famous to influential Latinas in history through stop-motion film and art making; the assembling of a collage with images and 3-D objects that represent her life; and a voiceover biography delivered in Spanish. Acquire another approach to allow your students to explore the contributions of famous and influential women of color in a way that is engaging, inspirational, informative, and fun.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 210B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Susan Deemer, Danielle Denton, Emily Otero, and Anthony Sabedra, Katherine Delmar Burke School (CA)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Changing Voice and Message: Building Equity for Racially and Economically Underserved Students Through College Planning E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Vistamar School has built a unique program that serves the needs of our Latino students and families. Get details on the development and implementation of this program. Attendees of PoCC are aware, often painfully, of practices common in independent schools that help to attract and yield less-prepared and less-advantaged students, without creating structures to address the past and present educational inequalities experienced by such students. To address these gaps, Vistamar engaged in an action research project to better understand the experiences of current and alumni Latino students and their families, then created and funded a dedicated position to serve this constituency. This program now has come to serve African-American and economically disadvantaged students from all backgrounds as well. The success of this program is the result of the vision and partnership of the head of school, key trustees, and colleagues — truly a broad institutional coalition for equity and inclusion.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 203B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Lupe Chacon and Karen Eshoo, Vistamar School (CA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Civil Rights and Science: Teaching Social Justice Through Science Curriculum E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Our program engages students with teaching strategies and specific units in historical and scientific content throughout the year, culminating with a student-centered trip to Birmingham, Alabama, to experience civil rights history through a science lens. Course content is tailored to grades 8-12, building science content with units that explore civil rights and social equity issues like the evolution of modern race through anthropology, history of genetic engineering, environmental inequities, and natural resources and demographic distribution. Starting from a science foundation, traditional subjects are aligned with social justice studies. Join us to examine your own grade-specific units of study and infuse it with current or historical cases of inequity. For example, when teaching modern genetics in biology, students learn to question definitions of race through DNA studies and genetic patterns, if any. Review case studies on the Tuskegee experiments, modern gynecology and slavery, and issues in environmental racism. Build units that culminate with a civil rights tour from Birmingham to Montgomery, with stops in Selma and Tuskegee.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 207D
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Tatesha Clarke and Shobita Mampilly, The IDEAL School of Manhattan (NY)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Communities in Question: How People of Color in Independent Schools Create and Sustain Community E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: How do you define community for yourself? How does your engagement best indicate your sense of belonging? As PoC working in predominately white institutions, we need community for survival, support, and growth. Analyze and understand the meaning of community to find new structures, systems, and ways to organize. Explore the purpose of community. In a space for structured and intentional dialogue, examine the nature of belonging in a variety of group contexts and determine which of those contexts provides the most fertile conditions for your full and best self to be acknowledged and utilized. Furthermore, examine what we as members can do to ensure sustainability of our most valuable and vulnerable communities. Let’s begin to dismantle the systems and structures of the oppressive status quo, decolonize the meaning of community, and create something new that promotes equity and inclusion.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 209A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Min Pai, Westland School (CA); Sherri Spelic, American International School (CA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Dashboarding Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: What, Why, and One School's How E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: The work of equity and inclusion is never done — but that doesn’t mean we can’t or shouldn’t hold ourselves accountable for advancing our practices, impacts, and outcomes. Join this working conversation to learn about dashboarding equity and inclusion, in order to understand how your school is doing, what your institutional strengths and growth edges are, and ultimately how your school can improve experiences and outcomes for all students, families, and employees. Gain understandings about what measuring equity and inclusion entails and why it's vital to dashboard your community's goals and growth. Hear about Athenian School's assessment of equity and inclusion and its journey to dashboarding, including the creation of an Inclusion Dashboard Consortium of more than 15 schools, which convenes for the first time in fall 2017.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 209B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Kalyan Balaven, The Athenian School (CA); Alison Park, Blink Consulting
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Diversity Leadership Is School Leadership E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Are you a diversity practitioner or a director of diversity and feel as if you have been pigeon holed into one leadership role? Have you ever wondered if you would be able to make the leap from a diversity practitioner to a division head or head of school? Are you a head of school questioning if a diversity director has the experience or skills to transfer into other leadership roles? Hear from five established independent school leaders, all of whom have held the position of director of diversity. Share successes and challenges they have encountered as they moved into different leadership roles and what worked well to help prepare them. Ask these panelists about leadership skills and experiences they have acquired as diversity practitioners that serve them well in past and current roles, and hear what diversity practitioners can do to map out their own leadership paths. Diversity directors and practitioners are skilled leaders who bring desirable skills and qualities into various leadership roles in our schools. Find out why!
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 208A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Crissy Cáceres, Georgetown Day School (DC); Christel McGuigan, Lakeside School (WA); Priscilla Morales, The Park School (MD); Steven Tejada, The Maret School (DC)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Find Comfort in Discomfort: Normalizing Race Conversations with Kids E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: What do conversations about race with young students look like? In this thought-provoking, interactive workshop, participants will lean into the discomfort of allowing space for important and timely race-based conversations to happen. Leave with developmentally appropriate teaching strategies and tools to help you to normalize conversations about often-silenced social topics.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 204C
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Sandi Crozier and Monique Marshall, Wildwood School (CA)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Invisible Voices in Literature: Why Are We Still Teaching To Kill a Mocking Bird? E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: To Kill a Mockingbird is arguably the most widely taught book in the U.S. education system. Since its release in 1960, this book has captivated the world and has stood as a symbol for justice — even against insurmountable odds. The fictional Atticus Finch is revered as moral and just, and through Scout's eyes, we are asked to see the world not as it is, but as it should be. However, in the age of Black Lives Matter, cultural competency, African-American history classes, white privilege, and Ta-Nehisi Coates, is To Kill a Mockingbird still an effective tool for teaching a modern day social justice narrative? Discuss how the book does not support an inclusive social justice narrative, but rather promotes supremacist thinking and ideas. Look at how our students are openly engaging with the N-word, and other problematic aspects of the text, to their social-emotional detriment. Look at To Kill a Mockingbird with fresh eyes and an open heart.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 162
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Aquita Winslow, Polytechnic School (CA)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Leading From Within: Four Teachers’ Journey to Diversity Leadership E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Two years ago, four teachers began a journey toward self-discovery and professional growth when they chose to focus their professional development hours on diversity. As a cisgender white woman, a British-Jamaican black woman, a Colombian black woman, and a gay white woman, we were the most diverse group of educators at the school. Although our school has a well-crafted Statement on Diversity, we struggled to find examples of how that statement was living and existing at our school. We quickly decided that we needed to move from conversation to action. Two years later, we are faculty representatives on the Board Diversity Task Force. We’ve made changes to our curricula and teaching. We lead full-staff workshops, host small-group discussions, and take an active role in hiring efforts to diversify our faculty. Recently, we’ve taken our efforts to our fourth-eighth grade students and formed a student diversity committee. Learn from our journey and get resources to make substantive changes in your own school community.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 207C
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Xiomara Burrell, Shannon Lindsay, Paula Williams, and Danielle Wright, High Meadows School (GA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Macro-Impact Unit on Microaggressions: Teaching Middle Schoolers the A’s and B’s of Unintentional Slights E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Although students in a school community care for each other, they can get sloppy and careless with words and actions. This can have a cumulative hurtful impact. Whether it be the touching of African-American students’ hair without permission or mistaking Asians for each other, microaggressions are happening. This is especially true in middle and high school where students are navigating through the deep waters of social interactions, experimenting with language, and pushing boundaries. Students need explicit instruction about microaggressions, a subtle but offensive comment or action directed at a minority or other nondominant group, often unintentional or unconsciously reinforcing a stereotype. Gain relevant and provocative tools that engage this age group on this sensitive topic. Beginning with the definition of microaggressions, move through how they are hurtful, what to do if you receive one, and how to repair a microaggression situation. As a final assessment and service project, students create PSAs about microaggressions that can be used as teaching tools for the rest of the community.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 153
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Cynthia Lee and Azizi Williams, Sequoyah School (CA)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Managing a First-Year Diversity Initiative: Tips, Tales, and Take Aways E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: The first year of any diversity initiative can feel like running a marathon even though you only trained for a 5K fun run. If you're already engaged in the early stages of building a program or if you're looking for resources and ideas to begin a diversity and inclusion program at your school, join us to focus on ideas and strategies for building a comprehensive framework for a successful program. Through interactive discussion, storytelling, and a review of best practices, take a lighthearted look at the successes and hurdles of building a diversity program from scratch.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 203A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Heather Case, Canterbury School (IN); Pascal Losambe, Columbus Academy (OH)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Men of Color Dare to Self-care: Debunking the Masculine Principle that Impedes Well-being E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: With greater attention being paid to mindfulness, meditation, and other reflective practices for looking after ourselves, why do a lot of men struggle with self-care?This session will help men of color to dismantle the masculine principle that they must be hyperactive, consistently "doing" (rather than "being"), and “sucking it up" no matter the costs. Centered around Dr. Martin Seligman’s Framework on Happiness and Well-being, participants will have the opportunity to embrace self-care techniques that help reduce stress and open more pathways to authentic truth and well-being. Join us to and learn about the five core components of Seligman’s healthful framework and create your own personal access card for engaging those components that will promote your own unique self-care practices.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 204A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Tony Hernandez, Reflective Wisdom
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Murphy’s Law or Your First Year in School Leadership: Practical Problem Solving and the Unexpected Challenges E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Many educators aspire to leadership roles and believe their past teaching experiences are preparation enough. In addition to the multifaceted educational responsibilities that come with leadership, managing the unexpected situations that arise in the lives of your students, faculty, and governance bodies are inescapable occurrences. The pressures of increased accountability to parents on the part of schools have magnified the need for a much broader and more diverse skill set in private school leadership than in years past. Investigate the cultural dynamics that impact leaders of color. Undergo a personal skills inventory, case study debriefs, and role play scenarios to analyze the process of managing the challenging situations that unexpectedly face newly appointed school leaders.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 207A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Sean Hamer, Germantown Friends School (PA); Marlon Henry, The Gordon School (RI); Michael Williams, Friends Academy (MA)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
My Mathematical Mind E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Establish a basic understanding of how mindset can set the stage for peace and productivity in the classroom. Many students and teachers have "math anxiety," which impacts students' ability to be successful in math courses. It is critical that students develop a healthy math identity in order to unleash their greatest potential. Implementing simple routines and teaching students strategies can elevate mathematics learning. Examine how mindset directly impacts students’ ability to be successful in mathematics and address the importance of math discourse. Explore creative ways to deliver math concepts to students and inspire them to embrace math learning. Also address the need to affirm all learning styles and present material in varied ways. In the elementary grades, it is often established early on who the "math people" are, but this is a myth. Students of color need to know they have beautiful mathematical minds and that they were meant to achieve greatness in this area.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 210A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Deborah Peart, The Westminster Schools (GA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Overcoming Affinity Group Resistance: What’s the Worry and What Can We Do? E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: We attend PoCC and feel the safe space, solidarity, and rejuvenation that come from affinity groups. We return home to our schools, eager to create such spaces for our students, staff, and parents. BOOM. You run into a brick wall. Why do schools resist affinity groups? How do you make the case for them and launch them meaningfully to minimize resistance? Discuss obstacles and strategies, gain resources and practice, and walk away more prepared to provide safe spaces for your school’s constituencies.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 204B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Rosetta Lee, Seattle Girls' School (WA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Racial Perception and Its Relationship to Perceptions of School Success in Early Childhood E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Race continues to operate as a barrier to educational and social mobility. Educators need to acquire ways to deal with race as a social, educational, and personal construct. For black children, negative racial perceptions can result in low sense of self-efficacy, demotivation, and underperformance in school (Steele, 1997). How black students perceive their race can play a role in how they view their own school success and can ultimately impact academic performance. Racial perceptions develop in early childhood, but are malleable. As a result, schools have the ability to provide opportunities for the development of positive racial development in early childhood classrooms. There are several interventions that can support positive racial perception development. Possibilities include the implementation of multicultural education, ongoing professional development, and diversity assessments. Each of these has implications for different stakeholders.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 208B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Tashon McKeithan, The Center for Early Education (CA)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Self-Efficacy Through Yoga: Mind, Body, Spirit E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Join a large group discussion about health and the body and its centrality to self-efficacy. Talk about the benefits of yoga and why it has been a method of healing and self-actualization for thousands of years. Learn how one woman of color has used yoga for almost 20 years to develop her own self-efficacy and get over mental and societal barriers, from when she pursued her master’s degree from Harvard Divinity School in World Religions to her present career in higher education. Benefit from her insight and years of practice.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 202B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Michele Brewster, University of California, Irvine
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
The MENA (Middle Eastern and North African) Student and Faculty Experience E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: Join Moroccan, Palestinian, and Lebanese-Turkish educators from across the country and across disciplines to explore what it means to be a MENA educator and MENA student in the independent school world. A common experience for this community is that we are often the only ones in our schools — either the sole educator or one of a handful of students. Thus, we do not have access to mirrors, which are crucial for social-emotional well-being as well as identity development for students. Share our personal experiences along with data from MENA students and families in our schools to address our unique struggles and support systems that work. Also address why MENA families either opt in or out of the independent school world.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 207B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Nadim Bawalsa, Friends Seminary (NY); Fakhereddine Berrada, Lakeside Upper School (WA); Dalal Juma, Forsyth School (MO); Melissa Mirza, San Francisco University High School (CA); Dena Saleh, St. Elizabeth's School (CO)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
The Transracial Adoptee at the Independent School — Who's Your Mama? E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: While many independent schools have students of color, and many have adopted students, there are a small but distinct crossover group of transracially adopted students of color who occupy a unique niche and traverse an even more complicated path than their nonadopted students of color peers. Faced with questions about their identity from all directions when their family of record is known, these students can be welcomed in two different worlds, can code switch beautifully, or can become the “little mermaid.” How much more difficult or easy is life for the transracially adopted student in an independent school? What special considerations should the school keep in mind, if any, and how can the school help these students thrive? How can faculty of color support transracially adopted students of color in developing healthy self-esteem, even when others question their racial upbringing? Examine these questions and more through the eyes of two former independent school transracially adopted students and their white head of school mother. All subjects are fair game given those parameters.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 202A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Marja Brandon, Woodland School (CA); Daniel Jabari Brandon Drevitch, Seattle Academy (WA); Peace Kitwana Brandon Drevitch, YSC Academy (PA)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
What's in a Name? Identity 101 E Friday, December 1,
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
  • Summary: "Your Identity should be so secure that when someone walks away from you, they don't take you with them!" Our names and sharing the history of our names are powerful ways to create purpose and a sense of pride, confidence, and inclusiveness in our classrooms. Creating thoughtful learning communities and opportunities for young children to engage in courageous conversations is the primary role of the teacher committed to creating inclusive spaces for lifelong learning. Highlight ways to honor cultural identity and recognize names as affirmations. Examine white privilege and the roots of linguistic bigotry by exploring the impact of white teachers who mispronounce the names of students of color. This is a session for the authentic educator ready to take your practice to another level, not only for students but also for yourself!
  • Block: E (Friday, December 1, 11:15 AM-12:15 PM)
  • Room number: 210D
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Jeff Menzise, Morgan State University; Maati Wafford, The Barrie School (MD)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
(Myth)nomer: Building Identity Through Literary Windows and Mirrors F Saturday, December 2,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Myths represent powerful window-mirror texts that can trigger deep reflection and self-actualization. It is important to foster identity through window-mirror texts. In his article “Windows and Mirrors: Why We Need Diverse Books,” Chad Everett describes how “[w]ith access to mirror texts, students are able to see that their narrative matters, and... students learn to understand and appreciate the narratives of others.” Define effective mirror-window texts and discover how to use mythology, both ancient and personal, as a means of affirming identity. Using mythology, this middle school workshop outline how to proactively promote cultural competency, self-actualization, and critical thinking. After defining mirror-window texts and identifying how to use them effectively in the classroom, access alternative cannons that provide a fresh lens for study and identity building. Review less familiar myths to reveal nuanced perspectives, metaphors, and themes that may not ordinarily surface in a traditional curriculum. Work to incorporate fresh mythology in an organic way, and take home next-steps and best practices for implementing our ideas.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 2, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 202A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Ivy Anastasia Alphonse Leja, Collegiate School (NY)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Act Local: Creating a Statewide Diversity Network for Independent Schools F Saturday, December 2,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Working in an independent school does not mean that you have to work independently. By creating a network of schools in your region or state, you can be part of something bigger, gaining and providing support for crucial progress in underresourced inclusion work. Discover how to start and sustain a flexible and responsive nonprofit organization that caters to the specific professional development needs of the schools in your area and just around the corner. From regular faculty of color socials to intensive, day-long workshops with influential leaders and thinkers in equity work, your state needs you to look beyond the confines of your school’s triumphs and challenges and start a team with long-term goals — goals that independent schools can reach together.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 2, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 207B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Erica Coffey, Collegiate School (VA); Kiki Davis and Cynthia Loetz, St. Catherine's School (VA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
All Bodies Are Good Bodies: Helping Girls of Color Develop Positive Body Image F Saturday, December 2,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Schools around the country and world are grappling with how to support the needs of their gender-nonconforming children. Explore supporting children of color (3 - 10-ish years of age), families of color, and staff of color in navigating the gender needs of our children in independent schools. Take home resources that are culturally competent, share your best resources, get tools to help your school continue moving forward, and explore stories of kids of color and the ways schools can consider and support their needs.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 2, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 207D
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Courtney Marshall, Phillips Exeter Academy (NH)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Beyond Black and White: Using Multiracial and Asian American Voices to Complicate the Racial Binary F Saturday, December 2,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: In our political conversations, on our media outlets, and even in our classrooms, when we speak about race and racism in this country, we tend to rely on a black/white binary that erases the voices of those who do not fall neatly on one side of that binary, and through that erasure, reifies white supremacist oppression. Through a focus on three texts that move beyond that binary-- Danzy Senna's Caucasia, Celeste Ng's Everything I Never Told You, and Gene Yang’s graphic novel American Born Chinese-- this workshop will empower participants to teach multiracial and Asian American voices in order to generate more robust, meaningful, and inclusive conversations about racial identity and racial justice in our high school and middle school classrooms. Using an anti-racist approach, the workshop will share age-appropriate strategies, activities, and discussion questions that will help our students appreciate these novels both for their literary and artistic merit as well as for the crucial lessons they teach about the complicated nature of our nation’s racial history, present, and future.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 2, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 210A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Deborah Katz, Georgetwon Day School (DC)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Brown Voices in Suburban White Space: Cross-Cultural Conversation, Conflict, and Deliberate Curriculum in Elementary Schools F Saturday, December 2,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Even in schools with a diverse staff, voices of students and faculty of color often go unheard and underground. In the absence of significant work and ongoing dialogue, schools become institutions that replicate the dominant culture. When multiple cultures coexist in schools, many assumptions are made about the ways in which business should be conducted — some voices are privileged while others are silenced. Learn about the ways one elementary school has worked to open up conversations in all classrooms and among adults that provide spaces for students and faculty to discuss identity, perspective, bias, privilege, power, and oppression and move toward social activism through the creation of a Dismantling Racism curriculum. With the increased volume and tenor of racist, homophobic, and anti-Muslim remarks and actions in our society, becoming an active antiracist school takes a commitment on the part of all teachers to actively teach to dismantle racism. Our times create an urgency for our adults and students to have these conversations now!
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 2, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 203A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Mary Antón and Jaime Smith, Bowman School (MA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Connecting Civil Rights and Global Competence for Powerful Learning: Tools, Strategies and Building Buy-In F Saturday, December 2,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: As educators who build reasoning and analytical skills, illuminate historical experiences, and strengthen empathy across perspectives, our role feels more critical than ever. At the same time, our internal structures, training, and social constructs constrain our ability to bridge crucial divides necessary for inclusive, culturally competent, and innovative learning. Too many school cultures limit diversity and global competence to separate silos, resulting in competing budgets, disconnected social groups, and limited impact for progress on both issue areas. Join global education thought leader Homa Tavangar for an interactive session that explores tools and strategies for bridging the divide between social justice, diversity, and global learning functions. Along the way, you will learn how to build allies and explore questions for moving diversity and global goals from the margins to core processes that can transform learning, identity and social experiences.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 2, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 210B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Homa Tavangar, Author and Global Education Adviser
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Decolonializing Art Education F Saturday, December 2,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Deconstruct white supremacy in visual art education and explore ways to narrate a more inclusive and generative pedagogy. Considering visual art as a language subject, the fundamental core of a visual art education in K-12 is nurturing each student’s way of seeing and process of making. Today in the U.S., art education is driven by the gaze and standards of modernity. Ideas of perspective, color theory, and composition are standardized by the profound technologies and philosophies of the Renaissance. Consequently, when students learn from these methods as the metrics of skill, their gazes become homogenized and perpetuate a white-supremacist hierarchy of beauty. How do art educators decolonize this circumstance when resources for teaching art are dominated by Western methodologies and students enter the class preconditioned that what appears like Velazquez, Manet, and Matisse is the height of fine art? How do we nurture the validity of their voice while also making it known that there are many ways to see and make — all of equal importance to Western modernity?
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 2, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 208B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Tammy Nguyen, The Berkeley Carroll School (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
From Manhattan to Montgomery: The IDEAL School of Manhattan's Civil Rights Journey to Alabama F Saturday, December 2,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: The IDEAL School of Manhattan, the only inclusion independent school in New York City, was founded in 2005 by a group of parents looking for an elementary school for their children. Social justice and civil rights are at the heart of the school's mission, and we have been committed to teaching our students to be activists and upstanders from our inception. It is in this vein that we set out in May 2017, to take students on a civil rights journey to Birmingham, Montgomery, and Selma, Alabama — cities vital to the movement. Hear about the pre-planning and research conducted, cultural institutions and sites visited, and our next steps and take aways learned from this inaugural journey. Find inspiration, take home resources, and begin devising your own plan of action to take back to your school community.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 2, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 207A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Tatesha Clark and Shobita Mampilly, The IDEAL School of Manhattan (NY)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
How Do We Listen Deeply When We Are Full up with Our Own Feelings? F Saturday, December 2,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: The need to feel heard and understood is human and universal, and students of color are people in our lives who often do not feel heard, and look to us to meet this need within them. Yet, particularly when we are having a conversation that involves emotionally-charged experiences related to race and identity, it can be difficult to hear clearly over the din of our own feelings and stories. We get overwhelmed by what the student may be experiencing, so we give advice, try to "fix it," offer our "wisdom" and reassurance — or top their identity story with our own! None of that is true listening. Focus on tools that can help you listen more deeply and compassionately. Come with a willingness to share so a colleague can practice listening, and a willingness to listen deeply so that person can feel heard. Both experiences feel good — and both will help you listen to your students of color when that is what they most need from you.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 2, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 203B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Paula Chu, The Stanley King Counseling Institute (Brooks School) (MA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Intersectionality, Immigration, Segregation: Exploring Asian-American and African-American Solidarity F Saturday, December 2,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Asian-American students comprise one of the largest groups of people of color in our independent schools. It is imperative that the history of Asians be taught in our schools to better understand 21st century racism and racial segregation, immigration, scapegoating, and exclusion. Of particular importance is the undertaught history of Chinese exclusionary laws of the late 1800s that targeted a specific ethnic group to prevent them from immigrating to the United States. The history of Asian Americans, African Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans is often taught as separate histories, and yet the experiences of each of these groups are deeply influenced by white supremacy. Join two middle school humanities educators with three decades of teaching experience (one Filipino American and one African American) to explore intersections and parallels to the Muslim ban, the segregation of African Americans in the Jim Crow South, and the anti-immigrant threat of a U.S. border wall as we attempt to make sense of America’s complicated history with immigrants.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 2, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 209A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: David Harris, Catherine Cook School (IL); Ricco Siasoco, Ethical Culture Fieldston School (NY)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Supporting Children of Color Navigating the Gender Journey F Saturday, December 2,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 2, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 208A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Nadirah Moreland, National Cathedral School (DC)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
The New Face of African-American Literature: Teaching a Post-Blackness Curriculum F Saturday, December 2,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: In a world where schools increasingly face discussions of race relations and #BlackLivesMatter, our students — both white and black — need the tools to understand and discuss the experience of being black in America. Look at strategies for making an African-American literature curriculum feel more immediately relevant, using literature as a springboard to looking at blackness from a sociological standpoint. Find room to discuss what your school’s current curriculum looks like and get tools for upper school educators to implement partial or whole curricular change. Review, discuss, watch, and get instructional resources to employ in your classroom. Focus on how to safely move students from thinking to feeling.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 2, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 207C
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Malikah Goss, Lakeside School (WA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Thinking Outside the Page F Saturday, December 2,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: Learn how a Spanish department at a middle school developed a curriculum without a textbook. Rely on the creation of units on migrant worker rights, environmental issues, and the evolution of Latin music to focus discussion on how to expose students to world issues and make cross-cultural comparisons in beginning and intermediate Spanish. Share a variety of successful formative and summative assessments and rubrics to create thematic units without the support of a traditional textbook. Uncover how to design effective units, as well as formative and summative assessments. Find out how to incorporate technology, realia, and authentic texts, while reviewing examples of student work and rubrics.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 2, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 202B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Alma Andrade, University Preparatory Academy (WA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Transforming Ghosts into Ancestors: The Psychological Case for Reparations to Descendants of American Slavery F Saturday, December 2,
10:00 AM-11:00 AM
  • Summary: In the June, 2014 edition of The Atlantic, Ta-Nahesi Coates presented a compelling argument for the just provision of material reparations to descendants of American slavery, not just because of that history of enslavement, but also for discrimination that has ensued. His is a moral argument.We note that in addition to the moral imperative of reparations, there are powerful psychological reasons to pursue a policy of repairing a profound tear in the multicultural fabric of the country. In the absence of an “official apology” and the offering of “compensation” for damages there exists a pervasive social toxicity that is powerful and invisible. This noxious, largely unconscious cultural dynamic invades the psyches of us all, contributing to challenges with anger, rage, terror, nihilism, anxiety, and social marginalization in African Americans, and fear, anxiety, shame and guilt in Caucasian Americans protected by powerful denial.We describe how reparations can be the antidote for these psychological maladies for Caucasian Americans as well African Americans, and how the “ripple effect” would create collective benefits we can barely imagine.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 2, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM)
  • Room number: 210C
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Bryan Nichols, Bryan Nichols and Associates Psychological Services, Inc.
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community