Workshops

Click or tap on a workshop to get expanded details, including the workshop summary and presenters.

Title Block Time Summary Track
ES1. Deeper than Diversity: Building a Culture of Equity Wednesday, November 28,
8:00 AM-12:00 PM
  • Summary: What would it take to build a school culture centered around unifying principles that value each member of the community, release genius, and nurture genuine relationships? We believe this calls for a profound change in the attitudes, behaviors, and structures that make up a learning environment, and with that, new skills. Draw from leadership principles of movement-building and global wisdom traditions to inspire long-term change from the bottom-up, while simultaneously exploring the responsibility of current school leaders. Activate creative imagination by dreaming up a school environment characterized by a vibrant, deep cultural equity and not just fleeting episodic incidents of cultural interaction. Form small groups to create visual representations of distinct elements you have imagined, and join them together in the form of a group collage made in part using repurposed materials. Collectively, the group’s creation offers a glimpse into a culture of equity.
  • Room number: 201 A
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminars (Morning)
  • Presenters: Eric Dozier, Episcopal School of Nashville (TN); Homa Tavangar, The Oneness Lab
Equity Seminar
ES2. Healing Justice: Using Restorative Process to Interrupt the School to Prison Pipeline Wednesday, November 28,
8:00 AM-12:00 PM
  • Summary: In this award-winning training, explore how predominant the unconscious mind is in human interactions, especially related to the perpetuation of racism and Islamophobia. Join this interactive session to uncover how to advance racial justice education through the integration of neuroscience. Key workshop design factors include strategies that reduce resistance and backlash by learners, especially by those with the most privilege, and avoid common activist traps that unwittingly support oppression, cynicism, and burnout.
  • Room number: 201 B
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminars (Morning)
  • Presenters: Shakti Butler, World Trust Educational Services, Inc.
Equity Seminar
ES3. Ideas to Action: Strategic Planning to Meet Your Equity and Inclusion Goals Wednesday, November 28,
8:00 AM-12:00 PM
  • Summary: Goal setting and strategic planning are the keys to effective equity and inclusion work. Unless intentional planning time is set aside, many schools find it challenging to balance the time demands of diversity programming, student support, and long-term institutional equity goals within the hustle of the academic year. Join this highly interactive workshop for equity and inclusion leaders who want to galvanize their teams to move from talk to action. Take advantage of the time away from school to focus on planning and strategy. Leave the workshop with a vision statement, prioritized strategic goals, and ideas for how to best communicate with various stakeholders.
  • Room number: 202 A
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminars (Morning)
  • Presenters: Stephanie Bramlett, Phillips Exeter Academy (NH)
Equity Seminar
ES4. Leading Through the N-Word Minefield: An Introspective, Strategic, and Courageous Approach to Dealing with this Strange and Troublesome Word (for Heads of Schools Only) Wednesday, November 28,
8:00 AM-12:00 PM
  • Summary: Start by exploring the history of the “N-word,” especially in relation to its impact on the hidden and implicit bias of school leaders, teachers, and students. Explore how current events, social media, literature (both classic and contemporary), popular music, and movies have used the word over the years and how it is brought into and used in our schools, surrounding communities, and some of our homes. Examine the role of heads of schools in navigating the presence and use of the word. Is it OK to permit use in literature but not in the hallways? What if parents say it’s OK? What if you make the news? How and when should your board of trustees be involved? Is it OK for black people to use it? What does race have to do with it? How do we have courageous and honest conversations that educate instead of devastate? How do school leaders walk the tightrope of balancing issues of intellectual freedom, race, whiteness, white privilege, hip-hop, English class, theater, athletics, and more? Get suggestions about the need and importance of understanding the various realities associated with the N-word and how to inform, challenge, encourage, and inspire all of us to be more introspective, strategic, courageous, consistent, and forgiving when dealing with this strange and troublesome word.
  • Room number: 202 B
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminars (Morning)
  • Presenters: Eddie Moore, The Privilege Institute; Marguerite Penick-Parks, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh
Equity Seminar
ES5. A Pathway for More Equity and Inclusiveness by Teaching Students to Ask Their Own Questions Wednesday, November 28,
8:00 AM-12:00 PM
  • Summary: Imagine classrooms alive with students actively formulating their own questions, learning how to improve their questions, and strategizing about how to use them. The ability to ask questions is both an academic skill and a democratic habit of mind that is now more important than ever. Students who learn to ask questions become more curious and engaged, take more ownership of their learning, and learn more deeply. Moreover, they gain practice with a critical-thinking and participation skill that is a cornerstone of civic engagement and getting your voice heard. By teaching this skill to students, educators can catalyze a stronger, equitable, more inclusive democracy and society. Examine the Question Formulation Technique (QFT) as an evidence-based strategy that activates three different thinking abilities: divergent thinking, convergent thinking, and metacognition. Experience the QFT and see examples of how to use it. Unpack how it works, plan how to integrate it into your practice, and reflect on the importance of all students learning to ask their own questions.
  • Room number: 202 C
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminars (Morning)
  • Presenters: Luz Santana, The Right Question Institute
Equity Seminar
ES6. What Your Asian-American Students and Faculty Won't Tell You but You Need to Know Wednesday, November 28,
8:00 AM-12:00 PM
  • Summary: Our school campuses have seen an increase in their Asian-American Pacific-Islander (AAPI) student populations. This community goes largely unnoticed except to be used as a wedge when discussing the deficits of other communities of color. AAPI student success is assumed, while failures are over amplified. This marginalization is due mainly to the model minority myth, which is the belief that there is something unique about Asian culture that drives success and educational outcomes. Oftentimes our AAPI communities buy into this myth and do not realize its negative impacts. Unpack and understand the complexities of AAPI experiences, noting the many differences between Asian immigrant and Asian-American experiences. Use first-person accounts, data, and discussions to explore the fallacy of the model minority moniker and breakdown assumptions and stereotypes, while seeing how this plays out in our schools.
  • Room number: 202 C
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminars (Morning)
  • Presenters: Drew Ishii, Sage Hill School (CA); Min Pai, Westland School (CA)
Equity Seminar
ES11. Advanced Facilitation Skills for POC Facilitating Formal (and Informal) Anti-Racism, Anti-Oppression Workshops and Seminars Wednesday, November 28,
8:00 AM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Attend this interactive session to learn to effectively facilitate/moderate difficult interactions. Addressing oppression as a root of facilitation challenges empowers us to overcome nuanced issues that derail groups, create a safe space, and manage common facilitation challenges effectively and successfully. Build skills and grow your ability and comfort in clearly defining, explaining, and discussing the construction of oppression to individuals at varying levels of experience. Witness and learn how to establish and hold safe(r) space for dialogue, enabling groups to lean into discomfort. Study and practice facilitation tools and various methodologies needed to lead meaningful, effective, 1:1, large and small intergroup conversation related to racism and oppression. Finally, address challenges unique to POC engaging this work, including the importance of self-care and emotional and physical safety.
  • Room number: 204
  • Category: Full-Day Equity Seminars
  • Presenters: Natalie Thoreson, InVision Consulting
Equity Seminar
ES12. Ally Is a Verb: The Role of White Educators at PoCC and Beyond Wednesday, November 28,
8:00 AM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: White educators, gain insights into why and how you can strengthen your competencies in supporting equity and justice initiatives in schools. Focusing on the importance of white affinity work and the development of accountable cross-racial partnerships, examine how to deepen your understanding of race and racism, whiteness, and the potential for transformative pedagogy by working with each other to develop your identity as an anti-racist educator.
  • Room number: 205 A
  • Category: Full-Day Equity Seminars
  • Presenters: Anshu Wahi, The Northwest School (WA); Randy Clancy, CARLE Institute; Benny Vasquez, Border Crossers; Xiomara Hall, The Chapin School (NY); David Byrnes, Educational Alliance
Equity Seminar
ES13. Beyond Diversity 101: Inclusive Communities and Equity Leadership Wednesday, November 28,
8:00 AM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: The path to creating truly diverse, equitable, and inclusive (DEI) school communities is often fraught with obstacles—both predictable and unforeseen. While school communities do have dynamics, traditions, and circumstances that are unique, many of the DEI challenges that occur in our independent school spaces are common and often predictable. Learn from three facilitators who share a combined 50 years’ experience in DEI work in education to better understand the DEI landscape in independent schools and engage with practical tools, case studies, frameworks, research, and professional and personal experiences. Increase your DEI knowledge and awareness, develop toolkits, and sharpen skills to support the development of the inclusive communities for which so many of our schools are striving.
  • Room number: 205 B
  • Category: Full-Day Equity Seminars
  • Presenters: Matthew Balano, The Thacher School (CA); Juan Carlos Arauz, E3: Education, Excellence & Equity; Amer Ahmed, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Equity Seminar
ES14. Creating Your School's Dashboard Wednesday, November 28,
8:00 AM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Join this Inclusion Dashboard Retreat for a journey toward creating your own data-driven inclusion dashboard. Spend the morning looking at examples of what dashboards could look like and how they can inform strategic planning, evaluation, and annual reporting. Examine inclusion survey best practices and the scaffolding needed to get the most out of dashboarding. During the afternoon create, evaluate, and share themes to generate questions to be used to inform your school’s inclusion dashboard metrics, which you can easily create using the pre-work we do during this session.
  • Room number: 205 C
  • Category: Full-Day Equity Seminars
  • Presenters: Kalyan Balaven, The Athenian School (CA)
Equity Seminar
ES15. Do You See What I Mean? Facilitating Courageous Conversations Visually Wednesday, November 28,
8:00 AM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: As educators and activists leading the work around diversity, equity, and inclusion in our schools, we are often called on to facilitate courageous conversations across identity, power, and difference. Though there are many dialogue models and tools, visuals can help set the stage, support thinking, and catalyze breakthroughs. Engage with a veteran facilitator to learn common facilitation models, avoid pitfalls, and manage polarity. Learn visual facilitation from an expert to help people see issues and perspectives more clearly. Unpack practical strategies on facilitating courageous conversations and leave with a visual toolkit to deepen your practice.
  • Room number: 208 A
  • Category: Full-Day Equity Seminars
  • Presenters: Kawai Lai, consultant; Rosetta Lee, Seattle Girls' School (WA)
Equity Seminar
ES16. Everything We Never Told You: Exploring Asian-American Mental Health and Well-Being Wednesday, November 28,
8:00 AM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: It is well documented in literature and practice that Asian American and Pacific Islanders engage in lower levels of help-seeking behaviors than other racial and ethnic groups. This is partially due to the cultural stigma of mental health. Join us for this interactive equity seminar to explore issues of mental health, well-being, and mindfulness in a culturally responsive manner. Drawing from Asian-American and Pacific Islander literature on mental health and on decolonization, engage in deep dialogue about these issues and begin to write your own shared narratives of mental health, mindfulness, and well-being in our work and in our lives.
  • Room number: 208 B
  • Category: Full-Day Equity Seminars
  • Presenters: Liza Talusan, LT Coaching and Consulting, LLC; Danny Chin, North Yarmouth Academy (ME); Yulie Lee, Moses Brown School (RI)
Equity Seminar
ES18. Connecting the Dots in Culturally Competent Leadership for Independent School: Climate, Recruitment, Hiring, Retention, and Accountability Wednesday, November 28,
8:00 AM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Join fellow heads of school, chief diversity officers, and school leaders to explore the boundaries of change to increase equity and meaningful inclusion for all members of your school community. Leverage opportunities to practice, discuss, and adapt practices and methods that move schools toward greater cultural competence in policies, procedures, and practices. Learn from culturally competent leaders and faculty from both higher education and independent schools to examine what it means to be a culturally competent leader. Explore: -What does cultural competence mean for leaders in independent schools? What would your school look like and how would it function if every faculty member, administrator, and staff member were working to improve their cultural competence? -Who has the cultural capital to create change that increases equity and meaningful inclusion in your school? Who takes the lead? Who deals with the pushback? Who pays the costs? Who benefits? -What are the risks, benefits, and challenges for you as a leader when you use your cultural capital to move the needle toward increased equity and real inclusion at your school? -What strategies work to recruit culturally competent faculty, administrators, and staff for your school to join you in this work? What existing patterns and structures in hiring get in the way of doing this? -What strategies can you use to ensure that your hiring process—including search committee selection, paper screening, question development, and methods of candidate evaluation, as well as search committee processes and practices—results in hiring the best culturally competent candidate? -What does cultural competence look like when applied to your school’s accountability measures for your faculty? Administrators? Staff? -How do you build ongoing accountability into your policies and practices in order to clearly reinforce changes toward greater equity and meaningful inclusion for all members of the school community?
  • Room number: 209 C
  • Category: Full-Day Equity Seminars
  • Presenters: Emma Coddington, Willamette University; Cris Clifford Cullinan, ALiVE: Actual Leadership in Vital Equity; Ruth Jurgensen, Francis Parker School (IL); Amani Reed, The School at Columbia University (NY); Christopher D. West, The Association of Black Employees, Pasadena City College
Equity Seminar
ES19. Supporting Student Organizing to Dismantle White Supremacy and Drive Institutional Change Wednesday, November 28,
8:00 AM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: In response to student demands, Columbia School of Social Work institutionalized a mandatory course on power, racism, oppression, and privilege (PROP) to shift school culture and better prepare students for practice. The result is an innovative course grounded in the undoing of anti-black racism and centering voices of students of color. Explore a timeline of collaborative institutional change processes, student-developed teaching tools, course evaluation, and experiential exercises to demonstrate the power of student organizing and necessity of an anti-racist lens. Beyond detailing the process of systemic change and ways it can be adapted to other institutions, experience parts of this course firsthand and begin to unpack these concepts. Join us if you want to move student demands into action, work in historically and/or predominantly white institutions, and seek to develop an anti-racist lens.
  • Room number: 210
  • Category: Full-Day Equity Seminars
  • Presenters: Ama Konadu Amoafo-Yeboah, Mary McDowell Friends School (NY); Elise Jayakar, The YA-YA Network; Sydnee Corriders, SRCorriders, LLC
Equity Seminar
ES17. The PoCC Leadership Institute for People of Color Wednesday, November 28,
8:30 AM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Note: This event begins at 8:30 AM. Gain powerful strategies to advance to the next level of leadership while building your network of fellow leaders, mentors, and sponsors in this unique seminar tailored for people of color. The PoCC Leadership Institute (PLI) offers state-of-the-art leadership development tools and strategies including the Everything DiSC™ Work of Leaders Profile, a premier research-based skills inventory that provides you with a deeper understanding of your individual leadership strengths and style. The seminar format includes in-the-moment coaching, peer exchange, and post-institute follow-up—all in an encouraging atmosphere designed to nurture and propel a compelling vision for fulfilling your career goals. Through facilitated dialogue with education leaders, gain an inside view into critical moves for long-term professional and personal growth and success. Topics include working effectively with mentors and sponsors, “hiring” and evaluating your advocate in the search process, acquiring the critical skills heads of school and key leaders wish they had before assuming their positions, and developing professional growth plans. Get invited to a post-institute online leadership development and support community.
  • Room number: 209 A-B
  • Category: Full-Day Equity Seminars
  • Presenters: Amani Reed, The School at Columbia University (NY); Nicole DuFauchard, The Advent School (MA)
Equity Seminar
ES7. Conscious Use of Power for Effective and Inclusive School Leadership (for Heads of School Only) Wednesday, November 28,
1:00 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Humans have a complicated relationship to power, a concept that is poorly understood yet exercised and contested on a daily basis. Power is the culprit behind a host of micro-behaviors and macro-outcomes including bullying, harassment, an inability to receive feedback, and over-policing and under-treatment of minoritized groups. In social justice circles power is harshly criticized and resisted while in corporate contexts it is sought after and over-valued. But neither fearing nor craving power is the answer. The solution lies in its conscious use, as unhealthy power dynamics are a result of its overuse or underuse, whether in our professional or personal lives. Research suggests school leaders need more training on how to use power effectively in order to advance racial justice and equity in both the classrooms and workplaces under their charge. Tackle the subject of power directly by: Understanding the importance of the unconscious mind in human behavior, choices, and attunement to social status; Exploring Arnold Mindell’s groundbreaking power model in order to leverage both our social and personal power; Recognizing Julie Diamond’s common “traps of power” and how school leaders can avoid them; and Developing both political and emotional literacy skills in order to lead with integrity and effectiveness.
  • Room number: 201 A
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminars (Afternoon)
  • Presenters: Shakil Choudhury and Annahid Dashtgard, Anima Leadership
Equity Seminar
ES8. Discover Your Distinction, Strengthen Your Emotional Intelligence Wednesday, November 28,
1:00 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: In this dynamic training session, participate in an experiential encounter that puts emotional intelligence front and center. Learn how to create the optimal conditions necessary for school leaders and educators of color to support development in five core social-emotional competencies that open hearts, inspire minds, and help educators of colors and allies navigate their school communities more effectively.
  • Room number: 201 B
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminars (Afternoon)
  • Presenters: Tony Hernandez, Reflective Wisdom; Lilliangina Quinones, North Atlanta High School (GA)
Equity Seminar
ES9. How to Build More Effective Partnerships with Families Wednesday, November 28,
1:00 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Envision a community where schools and families come together in partnership to best support children’s education, where parents and guardians ask questions to actively participate in decisions that affect their children, and where educators work with parents to build fundamental partnering skills. Learn how to use the Right Question Strategy, a flexible tool that can be implemented immediately into existing work with parents and families. It does not require additional staff, budgets, or administration. The strategy distills key theories and best practices for working with families into a cost-effective, adaptable approach that enhances the various things schools and educators already do in this area, including teachers meeting one-on-one with parents; school counselors or parent liaisons interacting with small groups of parents; Title I staff engaging more parents effectively; staff working with parents in individualized education program (IEP) meetings; and administrators communicating and collaborating more effectively with families. Use active-learning and skill-building exercises to learn core principles and simple, effective methods to strengthen partnerships between schools and families. Leave inspired and excited, with a clear action plan ready to implement in your school immediately.
  • Room number: 202 A
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminars (Afternoon)
  • Presenters: Luz Santana, The Right Question Institute
Equity Seminar
ES10. Make America _______ Again: What Happens to an American Dream Deferred? Wednesday, November 28,
1:00 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: In 1931, James Truslow Adams coined the American Dream as, “that dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for everyone, with opportunity for each according to ability or achievement.” However, is the American Dream truly attainable by all? While that may have been the ideal, everyday life and long-term opportunity can play out differently for everyone. Take an innovative approach to raising awareness and organizing your school community around issues of structural oppression and inequity. As featured in the documentary, I’m Not Racist… Am I?, The American Dream board game is a perspective-taking exercise that simulates experiences of inclusion and exclusion based on race, gender, class, sexual orientation, religion, and ability. Through structured play experience moving around the board in the new life-sized version of the game to provoke discussion about the intersectionality of identity, privilege, and equity.
  • Room number: 202 B
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminars (Afternoon)
  • Presenters: Shanelle Henry, Greens Farms Academy (CT); Andre Robert Lee, Germantown Friends School (PA)
Equity Seminar
Bridging the Divide Between African-American and African-Caribbean Students A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Centuries of separation between African-Americans and the African/Afro-Caribbean community have created tensions between these groups. There are both dichotomies and parallels in their experiences in American society. African-Americans have fought for centuries to acquire their freedom and are still fighting to preserve their rights. African/Afro-Caribbeans live an experience through the prism of colonization and white gaze. Both have developed a complex relationship with the white majority in America, one that scholar Shelby Steele describes as “bargainer” or “challenger.” The bargainer wants to make his or her way into the dominant group by playing by the rules, while the challenger fights against the white order. This relationship between bargainer and challenger is part of what defines blackness, as well as the survival of black immigrants in America. The goal of this presentation is to explore the relationship between African/Afro-Caribbean students and their African-American counterparts, as well as the relationship with second-generation African/Afro-Caribbean kids in independent schools.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 206 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Danaè Aicher, Rainbow Community School/Rainbow Institute (NC); Bara Mbengue, Cushing Academy (MA)
Anti-Racist Teaching, Training, Activism, and Allyship
Racial Diversity in K-3 Literature: Teaching Through Multicultural Literature in Early Elementary School A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: This workshop will focus on the importance of early exposure to a multicultural curriculum, specifically multicultural literature and racial diversity in literature. We will explore how and why children can develop prejudices and stereotypes early in life, as well as practical tips to implement in the classroom to combat these challenges. We will discuss children’s literature in terms of “mirror” books and “window” books and how to develop a pedagogy of opposition rather than an assimilation approach. The presentation will briefly examine what current research suggests for best practices in multicultural literacy instruction. Attendees will learn about books that are appropriate for K-3 students, books for educators, and ideas for lesson/curriculum alignment. Finally, the workshop will examine how parents of color and allies can become involved in their children’s multicultural literacy at home, as well as how parental engagement in invoking multiculturalism can provide consistency for children in both their school and their home environments.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 213
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Natalie Griffin, The Oak Hill School (TN)
Anti-Racist Teaching, Training, Activism, and Allyship
Children of Resistance: Navigating Identity, Equity, and Justice in the Classroom and Beyond A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: No matter what age or grade you teach, if you are committed to anti-bias education and inclusion in the classroom and beyond, this hands-on session is designed for you. The work will be interactive and thought-provoking while providing practical tools that can be easily implemented. Participants will be guided through a four-stage process of Traversing the Road to Refinement through a systematic study of self. Four key journeys will be highlighted, along with techniques for engaging in this work: the Journey of Identification—understanding identity validation and identity threat for ourselves and our students; the Journey of Interrogation/Interruption—being courageous enough to ask hard questions in order to dismantle biases; the Journey of Illumination—shedding light on the systematic ways that prejudice and assumptions affect us all; and the Journey of Institutionalization—steps we can take to dismantle oppression and injustice in our communities and institutions. We will work in small groups to unpack ideas around spiritual preparation of the teacher and how we can ground ourselves in philosophy by applying these concepts with authenticity and social impact.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 106 A-C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Maati Wafford, Barrie School (MD); Jeffery Menzise, Morgan State University (MD)
Anti-Racist Teaching, Training, Activism, and Allyship
Strategic Self-Advocacy: Deeper Learning Through the Application of Thinking Routines to Difficult Conversations A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Imagine a skill-building tool for deeper teaching and learning as the vehicle for a difficult race-based conversation. Learn how to unlock the potential of a difficult conversation using a Thinking Routine protocol as an objective framework. Thinking Routines are three-step patterned pedagogical approaches developed by Project Zero, an education research group at Harvard University, that invite learners to engage in close observation, to unearth complexity, to make meaning of learning, and to identify axes of change. Participants will apply a Thinking Routine protocol to a difficult conversation presented in a case format. The case was created by faculty of color for faculty of color to use as an opportunity to collaboratively problem-solve with white peers. Acquire the strategic self-advocacy skills needed to confidently present your case to white peers in a way that invites them to see and hear your narrative through a calibrated lens. Inspire meaningful empathy and deeper connection with your white peers. Build your ally network in a scalable way. Switch from a reactive to a proactive stance within your respective institution, and be an agent of positive change.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 201 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Gracie Alcid, Gann Academy (MA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Biases and Balance: Identifying and Supporting Learning Challenges in Students of Color A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: How do racial biases and cultural beliefs about learning affect our perceptions of students’ academic performance and behavior in school? Independent schools are trying to strike a balance between referring students of color for evaluation and learning support either too often or not often enough. In this session, we will discuss ways to identify learning obstacles for students of color and communicate academic and behavioral concerns with the goal of seeking appropriate supports. We will challenge participants to examine when and how to gather student data and observations, effectively communicate concerns, implement in-school supports, and share outside resources with families. Participants will learn strategies to guide their learning support teams through close and critical analysis of their own practices with an eye toward advocating for students and families of color.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 205 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Kristen Goodlett and Dayana Jimenez, The Berkeley Carroll School (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Language, Labels, and Power: The Intersection of “LD” and Students of Color in Independent Schools A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: This workshop is designed to challenge participants’ thinking around students of color who are labeled “learning disabled”; raise awareness of how students of color can be doubly stigmatized in the federal special education system; and consider how one independent school, established for students with learning differences, educates students, including students of color. We will explore scientific, historical, and political voices in “special education,” including a discussion of civil rights legislation as an inspiration for disability rights legislation. Finally, we will share our educational setting where differences such as ADHD and dyslexia are seen as engines of innovative thinking and catalysts for empowering students of color and all students with differences.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 104 A-E
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Yvette Shepard and Robert Lane, Lab School of Washington (DC)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
“How Do Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice Apply to Me?” Double Marginalization of International Students A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: International students in independent schools have more than doubled in the past decade. They generally make up 7 to 15 percent of the student population in these schools and are considered an indispensable and integral part of creating a diverse school community. Nevertheless, these students often feel doubly marginalized as they cannot easily integrate themselves with domestic students—culturally, socially, and politically—and they do not feel welcome to participate in the often domestically focused discourse of equity, inclusion, and social justice. International students can be left feeling upset and frustrated about the fact that they are financially and culturally significant but socially voiceless in their schools. This presentation examines the challenges of international students in the context of current efforts to advocate equity, inclusion, and social justice in American independent schools. Participants will examine meaningful ways, along with changes in school policy, language, and curricular structure, to embrace and empower international students to become an active part of this discourse rather than mere bodies to “be diversified.”
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 206 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Po-Wei Weng and LeeAnn Brash, The Cambridge School of Weston (MA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Beyond the College Office: Supporting Black Students Applying to Highly-Selective Colleges and Universities A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Black students seeking admission to highly-selective colleges and universities face a unique set of challenges. This includes historic and systemic barriers to higher education in addition in to admit rates that hover in the single digits. The sociopolitical landscape of independent schools can further complicate the already stressful college application process. Key institutional agents, beyond those working in the college counseling office, gain information and skills related to highly-selective college admissions. Hear a brief presentation featuring experienced admissions professionals and educators of color who have attended and successfully guided students to Ivy plus schools. Engage in a mock college application case study activity and discussion. Critically examine how black students are helped or hindered by the college-going culture at your school. Whether in a teacher’s classroom, an administrator’s office, at an office manager’s desk, or courtside with a coach, discover the many opportunities to make an impact on a student’s post-secondary choices.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 203 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Amanda Addison and Maria Gaston, University of Pennsylvania
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
When Keeping It Real Isn’t Realistic: Deconstructing the “Name Game” in College Counseling A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: 4.6, 5.5, 6.3, 7.2. Those four numbers represent the percentages of students admitted into the class of 2022 at Harvard, Princeton and Columbia, Yale, and Brown, all of which received upwards of 35,000 applications. They, along with a small selection of equally competitive schools, continually find themselves at the center of the college search, while other, lesser-known options are deemed unworthy. This “Ivy problem” is often compounded by the independent school environment. When students of color, first-generation students, and children of immigrants enter the independent school system, there is often an inherent expectation that the final outcome of their experience will be admission to an elite, highly selective college or university. How do we, as college counseling professionals, faculty, and administrators in independent schools, help our students and their families recognize that the “name brand” school may not necessarily be the best fit? How can we encourage those students and families to reframe what it means to have a “successful” college admissions experience and stop playing the “Name Game”?
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 205 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Khaliah Williams and Ashley Finigan, The Berkeley Carroll School (NY); Greg Williams, Westminster School (CT)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Integrating Fat Positivity Into Diversity Curriculum A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Educating our school communities about anti-fat attitudes is a key component of diversity training. According to the National Eating Disorder Association, “Black teenagers are 50 percent more likely than white teenagers to exhibit bulimic behavior, such as binging and purging.” While teens of all races exhibit body dissatisfaction, nonwhite students are less likely to have their voices and experiences centered. Just as students learn that bodies come in a variety of colors, so too can they learn to affirm size diversity. This workshop invites participants to think about fat oppression in the context of other forms of body-based discrimination. Using Sonia Renee Taylor’s The Body Is Not An Apology: The Power of Radical Self Love and Roxane Gay’s Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body, the presenter will trace the ways size discrimination happens on campus and the effects it has on our students, particularly girls of color. Participants will learn some of the ways adults can counter anti-fat attitudes in the classroom, dining hall, sports field, and beyond.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 202 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Courtney Marshall, Phillips Exeter Academy (NH)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Upstream: Using Music to Build Beloved Community in Preschool to Third-Grade Classrooms A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Nip troubles in the bud; sow the great in the small. Big things of the world can only be tackled by attending to their small beginnings.—Lao Tzu. In order to build the world we need, it is clear that we must head upstream and begin the work with our youngest learners. In this workshop, we will share a participatory sequence of original songs and discuss how these songs can be used to open up meaningful, developmentally appropriate dialogue in the classroom around racial justice; dissolve nascent prejudice; build awareness; affirm our identities; build inclusive community; and empower students to exemplify respect and equity in the face of role models demonstrating the opposite. We will end by sharing our creative process and putting it to use in order to make a group song. You will leave with a toolbox of new songs and a clear sense of how to create songs with your students in a way that supports and deepens your identity, equity, and inclusion work. Come sing with us!
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 211
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Dwight Dunston, Friends’ Central School/City Love (PA); Brian Jordan, The Philadelphia School/City Love (PA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Colorism in the Latinx Community A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: “Colorism” is a term commonly used among people of color. But what does colorism look like in the Latinx community? In this workshop, we will discuss different instances of colorism from varying Latinx lenses. Attendees will explore their own experiences, look at case studies, and walk away with strategies for addressing colorism when they witness it. By changing the narrative in their personal lives and in their schools, participants will be able to spread awareness and create a more equitable and inclusive environment for both educators and students.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 201 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Gabmara Alvarez-Spychalski, The Baldwin School (PA); Kerry Kettering-Goens, The Haverford School (PA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Black in School: Black Alumni Who Work and Enroll Their Kids at Independent Schools A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Improving the educational settings for black students at independent schools can be further supported by understanding the experiences of alumni who currently work as faculty and staff and who enroll their kids in an NAIS school. If we are to increase the number of schools who have and implement their diversity plan (only 50 percent reported having one in NAIS’s recent Diversity Practitioner Survey) and support efforts at improving the experiences of black students at independent schools, understanding the past and current experiences of black alumni who serve in a faculty or staff role could provide invaluable insight. In this session, nationally gathered data from in-depth interviews with current black faculty and staff who are alumni of NAIS schools will be presented. We will highlight the experiences and lessons learned of black alumni while attending an independent school, why they chose to work at independent schools, and why—despite the legacy of marginalization, racism, and discrimination faced by black faculty and students within independent schools—they decided to enroll their children at such a school.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 210
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Joshua Childs, University of Texas at Austin; Celeste Sanders, Greenhill School (TX); Carla Childs, St. Andrew’s Episcopal School (TX)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
How Racial Anxiety Blocks the Work A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Racial anxiety is the anxiety and emotion a person can feel when interacting with people of other races. For people of color, this may be about concern for safety, worries about discrimination, and even fatigue around dealing with the fragility, shame, and guilt that can come from people in the dominant culture. For people in the dominant culture, this may be concern about being called racist, fear of saying something offensive, or a general feeling of not knowing how to approach a situation. Whatever the cause of the anxiety, it can get in the way of productive conversations, be a major block to creating inclusive spaces, and create separation between people of different races. Join the presenter, the director of inclusion and outreach at Catlin Gabel School, for an interactive workshop that will provide strategies to help everyone move beyond anxiety and other emotions to be more effective communicators and ultimately create the most inclusive spaces possible.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 204
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Jasmine Love, Catlin Gabel School (OR)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Inclusive and Equitable Support: Creating Effective Learning Resources Programs A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Are your current academic support services effectively supporting students of color? Support services can positively influence students who experience academic challenges in independent schools, but are they equitable? In this presentation, we will explore our current learning resources programs and discuss ways to be more inclusive in supporting students of color. Data on learning resources use by students of color from our respective schools will be presented as a starting point. Participants should be prepared to engage in conversation around their own support services (or lack thereof), and case studies will be presented and discussed. Participants will leave with short- and long-term strategies and goals to create a more equitable, active, and inclusive learning resources program in their schools.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 212
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Stephen Wright, Latin School of Chicago (IL); Elisse Battle, Georgetown Day School (DC)
Equity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Transforming the Pipeline: Building Student of Color Support Systems Through Middle and Upper School A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: STEPS, or Students Together Empowering People of Color Successfully, is a student-initiated, teacher-supported peer mentoring program founded at the Horace Mann School. It supports the academic, social, and emotional needs of students of color as they transition from middle to high school. This workshop will share best practices and lessons learned for creating infrastructure, assessing institutional deterrents, and engaging white faculty and staff in the work. The session is geared toward diversity practitioners and educators who are in the early stages of programming to support students who self-identify as persons of color. Participants in this session will gain (1) operationalized methods to implement a program model like STEPS in their schools, (2) a framework for navigating parental engagement and buy-in, and (3) an assessment of school climate in order to produce a successful and sustainable program.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 205 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Sharina Gordon and Ronald Taylor, Horace Mann School (NY)
Equity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Teacher Turnover: Why It Matters and What We Can Do About It A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: While there is still much work to be done, some independent schools have experienced success in recruiting diverse faculty. Unfortunately, much of that success is usually erased within the first two to four years. The effects and costs of attrition for a school and its community are many. This session will examine the factors that contribute to attrition and retention; the research presented by facilitators and the dialogue shared by participants will help schools develop a framework for change. This session will also examine the Four Corners of Retention—employer, manager, professional development, and community—and the correlation of these “corners” to successful retention. Participants will be invited to share their experiences, perspectives, and insights.They will leave with a diagnostic tool developed to assess risk for faculty attrition at their schools.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 207 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Corinne Fogg, Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart (MD); Warren Reid, NEMNET Minority Recruitment; David Grant, The Potomac School (VA)
Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
"Leaders of the New School" A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Einstein’s theory of insanity as “doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results” fuels us as PoCC leaders gather to build game-changing schools and teach game-changing strategies that lead to game-changing outcomes for our students of color. Within our eight-hour school days, leaders of color are working harder than we’ve ever worked before, but the vast needs of our students and communities require that we be strategic and thoughtful in our approach. This session will assist leaders in drafting an actionable school plan using a four-pronged approach that drives academic success, culturally empowers students of color, and addresses the unique social-emotional and tangible needs of our marginalized populations. If you are a game-changing educator and are up for the challenge, join us for “Leaders of the New School.”
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 101 D
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Mike Brown and Sundiata Salaam, Freedom Preparatory Academy Network (TN)
Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
“Murphy’s Law” or Your First Year in School Leadership: Practical Problem-Solving and Unexpected Challenges A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Many educators aspire to leadership roles and believe that their past teaching experiences are preparation enough. In addition to the multifaceted educational responsibilities that come with leadership, there will be many unexpected situations that arise in the lives of students, faculty, and governance bodies. The pressures of schools’ increased accountability to parents have magnified the need for a much broader and more diverse skill set in private school leadership than in years past. We will investigate the cultural dynamics that impact leaders of color. We will also take participants through a personal skills inventory, case study debriefs, and role-play scenarios to analyze the process of managing the unexpected and challenging situations that newly appointed school leaders will inevitably face.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 202 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Sean Hamer, Germantown Friends School (PA); Michael Williams, Friends Academy (MA)
Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
Top-Down Ground-Up: Creating Inclusive Schools A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: This seminar seeks to address two questions: How do we create a culture that fosters student and faculty leaders in diversity, equity, and inclusion work so that they are ready to engage in a conference like PoCC/SDLC, and how do we nurture developing leaders once they return from the intensity of such a conference experience? Presenters will share their personal journeys in creating a “top-down ground-up” approach. Participants will understand and begin to identify ways to create ground-up student engagement and leadership; nurture the voices of students as they return from SDLC; and promote diversity, equity, and inclusion at the faculty level. By providing a safe place for educators to hear the story of the Atlanta Girls’ School, we hope to encourage more educators to begin their own stories that will help them apply their experience at PoCC/SDLC-Nashville to their schools.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 101 E
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Shetal Shah and Jennifer Halicki, Atlanta Girls’ School (GA)
Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
Four DEI Directors Who Have Considered Bouncing When the Rainbow Is Not Enough A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: The role and work of the DEI (diversity, equity, and inclusion) professional in independent schools is one of the most necessary yet confusing and frustrating areas of school life. How new practitioners are (or aren’t) mentored and guided through a leadership and programmatic process can be even more mysterious. Learn from five Atlanta-based panelists representing both seasoned DEI veterans and newcomers to the work as they share stories, create networks of support, and transform into dynamic leaders and mentors for others. This interactive session will help new directors design a path to institutional success while learning how to set boundaries, self-nurture, and rely on others for support. We will incorporate media, personal stories, small-group work, and a case study to shed light on strategies that will move schools forward and extend the professional lives of DEI practitioners.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 207 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Oman Frame, The Paideia School (GA); Keith White, Holy Innocents’ Episcopal School (GA); Judy Osborne, The Westminster Schools (GA); Ellice Hawkins, The Lovett School (GA); Joanne Brown, Pace Academy (GA)
Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
Stand Out! Preparing and Distinguishing Yourself as a Candidate for Senior-Level Searches (Part 1) A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Standing out in a competitive search can be challenging. Distinguishing yourself as a candidate starts long before the interview or contact with the search committee or consultant—even before you prepare your materials. Find out how to prepare materials that stand out, understand search and interview expectations, and present yourself as the candidate of choice. What does this mean for you as a person of color? What do you need to know about a school/organization, search committee, or consultant? Get all the answers from a sitting head of school who shares his experience as a candidate and a search and recruitment consultant with extensive experience focusing on diversity, equity, and inclusion.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 102 A-B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Sherry Coleman, consultant; Luis Ottley, St. Martin’s Episcopal School (GA)
Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
Critical Pedagogy: Breaking the Idea of Students as Cultural Capital A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Why use critical pedagogy in independent schools? The goals of critical pedagogy in the classroom—using critical pedagogical practices to encourage the transforming of oppressive relations of power in a variety of domains—seem counter to the objectives of most independent schools. Yet, critical educators working at independent schools are as equally mandated as their public school counterparts to embrace and adapt critical pedagogical methodology, requiring students belonging to the power group to debate and engage with all the students in the classroom. This process limits the power of schools to see students as cultural capital but rather creates a nonstratified community, so that “social mobility” becomes unnecessary, thus resisting the idea of the role of private school education as a means of becoming more socially and economically mobile. Critical pedagogy in independent schools allows for a unique type of praxis that removes all students from the cycle of having to exist as cultural capital.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 207 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Susannah Livingston, Grace Church School (NY)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
Team Diversity Four Years Later: Refining Institutional Change Through a Diversity Team A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: In 2014, the Diversity Team for the Center for Multicultural Affairs at Hathaway Brown School presented a model for approaching community-wide equity work at the preschool through 12th-grade school. Since then, we have worked to evolve and refine our approach to schoolwide engagement in the realm of diversity, multiculturalism, equity, and inclusion. This workshop explores the process we used to reflect on strengths and address areas for growth in intentional ways that allowed us to increase the impact of our program on all students from the youngest learners to alumnae. Learn about changes made in the program to meet the evolving needs of a diverse community as we navigate changing seasons, political climates, and trajectories in the school story. Explore how we have used the data from our participation in NAIS’s AIM (Assessment of Inclusivity and Multiculturalism) to inform this evolution, including collaboration with the board of trustees, faculty, staff, and students and families to solidify the school’s commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 202 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Camille Seals, Toni Cross, Stefanie Albrecht, Leah Jackson, and Alaina McCourt, Hathaway Brown School (OH)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
Tools for Cultural Competency in Schools A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Over a 10-year period, the enrollment of students of color in independent schools has increased by almost 10 percent, according to NAIS. Unfortunately, many school leaders have trouble identifying and promoting inclusivity within their schools, especially when school cultures or implicit biases reinforce inequitable practices. The result is an achievement gap between students of color and their white counterparts. Throughout the 20th century and the first decades of the 21st century, cultural competency has been used as a way to shift school cultures and affect student achievement, especially for traditionally underrepresented groups. Using case studies, examples from personal experiences, and evidence in the literature, this workshop will inform administrators, faculty, and staff how to shift a school’s culture, develop common language around cultural competency, and implement practices that could eventually affect student achievement. Participants will be encouraged to collaborate as they brainstorm ways to turn theory into practice for their particular contexts.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 101 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Pascal Losambe, The Columbus Academy (OH); Heather Case, Canterbury School (IN)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
Head of School Track | How Not to Stereotype Students of Color in Your Fundraising Practices A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Fundraising for financial aid is one of the most important and meaningful projects a head of school can undertake. All schools benefit from socioeconomic diversity and increasing access for students and families who cannot afford to pay our rising tuitions. But raising funds for financial aid poses different challenges than raising money for a new athletic center or theater. Despite the racialization of income and wealth in our nation, it’s critical to create methods and messages that don’t stereotype any of the students and families who receive these efforts.Hear from heads of school and fundraising professionals about racially and culturally responsive ways to message and motivate board members, alumni donors, parents, faculty, and other key constituents to support financial aid fundraising.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 208 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Pilar Cabeza de Vaca, Madeira School (VA); Danielle Heard, Nashoba Brooks School (MA); David Allyn, NAIS Board of Trustees
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
Head of School Track | Making Progress with Equity and Inclusion: An Innovator’s Journey A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: The demographic and cultural trends impacting schools are disrupting and challenging the traditional viewpoint of what an independent school should look like. Capitalizing on this evolving landscape offers independent schools enormous opportunities to innovate, reimagine, and fully realize their mission and responsibility to serve all students equally well. Explore frameworks and concepts you can use to lead your school to successful innovation in its equity and justice priorities. Walk away with a process map and materials you need to replicate the innovation process with your team.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 209 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Mark Mitchell and Tim Fish, NAIS
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
Protecting the Innocence of Girls of Color A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Based on a recent report, Girlhood Interrupted: The Erasure of Black Girls’ Childhood, this interactive workshop focuses on ways educators can create classroom environments that not only acknowledge the existence of trauma in the lives of girls of color but also provide a culturally competent classroom environment where they can belong and achieve academically.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 214
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Nikki Williams Rucker, Mount Vernon Presbyterian School (GA)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Black Boys Doing What? Evaluating, Selecting, and Incorporating Children’s and YA Lit Featuring Black Boys A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: What children’s and young adult literature centers the experiences of black boys, and how do educators incorporate these robust texts into their classroom practices? This workshop—grounded in the belief that transformative literacy practices for our black boy readers are possible and necessary—will provide participants with tools for evaluating and selecting #OwnVoices texts (those written and illustrated by writers who share the same racial and ethnic background) about black boys. Participants will use tools to evaluate black children’s literature that takes into account what experiences are presented in texts, portrayals of gender and masculinity, and the presence of black love as they determine how to make informed decisions about black boys in children’s and YA literature. By the end of the workshop, participants will have an understanding of the breadth of availability of black boy literature, the ability to determine which texts are worthy of incorporating in their classrooms and in their work with children, and strategies and resources for incorporating this literature as part of inclusive reading practices.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 209 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Kim Parker, Shady Hill School (MA); Jack Hill, Cambridge Friends School (MA)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Actioned-Oriented Social Justice Leadership and Gentrification: Pushing Beyond the Boundaries Toward Envisioned, Equitable School Communities A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Explore the ways the gentrification of cities across racial and socioeconomic fault lines has resultant consequences for neighborhood and community schooling, with many parents and families seeking alternative forms of education and school choices. Join us to consider the role of independent schools, and in particular leaders of color, to transcend traditional boundaries of public versus private education to reach students from racially and socioeconomically marginalized backgrounds. Highlight the priorities for a heightened emphasis and focus on leadership preparation and development applicable to leadership within racially and culturally diverse contexts and identities. Through our collective exploration in the workshop, feel encouraged to extend your [re]thinking as we strive to reimagine and formulate a new and comprehensive definition of action-oriented social justice leadership that emphasizes the importance of cultural integrity, affirmation of individual uniqueness, and collective racial and cultural identity.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 108
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Pearl Rock Kane, The Klingenstein Center; Phillip Smith, Teachers College, Columbia University
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Bouncing Back: Building Resilience After Experiencing or Causing Racial Microaggressions A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Psychology professor Derald Wing Sue defines racial microaggressions as “the brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, and environmental indignities that communicate hostile or derogatory racial slights and insults to people of color.” How can people of color bounce back and develop resilience from these insidious remarks and educate white people about the damage of racial microaggressions? How can white people better understand racial microaggressions, bounce back from white fragility, and develop resilience for addressing the microaggressions they commit? Participants will work in racial caucus groups, share within the larger group, and come to a better understanding of how to recuperate from racial microaggressions and how best to address them when they occur. This workshop is open to people of color in all positions and white allies.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 209 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Sandra Chapman, LREI (NY); Sarah Hershey, Courageous Change Consulting
Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Brand Yourself: Frameworks for Validating Your Professional Value Within Your School Community A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Many educators of color in our schools struggle to be recognized for the contributions they make to their school communities. Educators of color are more often recognized for the cultural diversity they bring to a community, but the individual passions and professional skills that are used across our institutions are often limited in visibility. The lack of natural affinity experiences with administrators, colleagues, and families may leave the “value added” by faculty of color unseen and unheard by the broad majority. We will investigate the community dynamics that diminish the ability of faculty of color to be acknowledged for their contributions, strategies to minimize these impacts, and frameworks to improve exposure and enable them to flourish in their environments. We will take participants through an action planning session and case study debriefs to create a framework for application at their school sites.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 101 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Sean Hamer and Mikael Yisrael, Germantown Friends School (PA); Marlon Henry, Gordon School (RI)
Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Less Than Two Degrees: Using Our Networks for Personal and Professional Growth A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: In the world of independent schools, strong professional networks are critical to leadership development and career advancement. PoCC has been critical to that development: The fellowship and love that have been nurtured over the years can be experienced simply by walking the hallways between workshop sessions. Though the network of people of color in independent schools provides essential emotional and psychological support, we do not consistently recognize the depth and strength of its influence. As people of color, how can we better leverage the networks we have created to reach our professional goals? Using firsthand experiences, professional literature, and survey data, we will explore the value of our networks and identify the key components of effective network cultivation and utilization. Participants will have the opportunity to examine their personal networks, share tips with each other, and build on the tools shared in our presentation.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 207 D
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Eric Osorio, The Calhoun School (NY); Noni Thomas López, Gordon School (RI); Erica Corbin, The Chapin School (NY); Alewa Cooper, Greens Farms Academy (CT); Antonio Williams, William Penn Charter School (PA)
Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Be the Power and the Point: Why You Need to Present at Your Next Conference A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: How often have you attended a session at a professional conference and sighed to yourself afterwards, “I could have done that!”? Of course you could have, and now you absolutely should! This workshop is for anyone who has ever considered proposing a session for a conference but didn’t find the courage, for folks who have submitted proposals but were disappointed by rejection, and for people who have presented at conferences before and are willing to share their insights. Presenters and panels of color may be tough to find at major education conferences, and it behooves us as PoC to encourage, support, and sponsor each other in our respective fields to ensure that our perspectives are sufficiently considered and represented. In this workshop, we will list the ingredients for successful proposal writing, review the importance of understanding the conference audience, and help you begin creating your session of choice that will allow you to engage others meaningfully and authentically.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 203 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Sherri Spelic, The American International School Vienna (Austria)
Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
What Am I Doing Here? Centering Ourselves as Educators of Color in Independent Schools A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: Research indicates that many people of color enter the field of education motivated by a deep sense of community-mindedness or a desire to support equity and social justice. However, independent schools are often places that feel isolating, even alienating, to educators of color. This workshop provides an opportunity to explore research about factors that attract educators of color to the field and our career experiences and outcomes in education. After a research-based introduction, workshop participants will have the opportunity to explore their own reasons for becoming educators, discuss their experiences in independent schools, and develop a personal mission statement that can support and inform their work moving forward. This workshop will help us explore our stories with the goal of renewing a sense of personal purpose in independent schools.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 208 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Alain Sykes, Hawai‘i Preparatory Academy (HI)
Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Return: Exploring the Experiences of Independent School Alums as Staff and Faculty of Color A Thursday, November 29,
10:30 AM-11:45 AM
  • Summary: If you self-identify as a person of color who attended or graduated from an independent school, join us as we discuss the experience of returning to the spaces that molded our early childhood or adolescent experiences. These predominantly white and affluent spaces can often be a source of trauma in a person’s life. Explore with others who identify like you what it means to re-enter these spaces. Discuss how a person’s adult experience as a member of the staff or faculty mirrors (and differs from) personal experience as a student or the current student or adult experience. Moving away from focusing solely on the individual, we will think about the systemic challenges our alma maters experience. Then we will begin to strategize collaboratively about how we can leverage our own experiences to effect institutional change, moving toward a more equitable and healthy community.
  • Block: A (Thursday, November 29, 10:30 AM-11:45 AM)
  • Room number: 101 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Dwight Vidale, Riverdale Country School (NY)
Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Learning While Black B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: This workshop will explore the link between traditional educational systems, independent schools, and the “preschool-to-prison” pipeline. We will share personal stories of racial biases in the classroom and examine regional statistics regarding unfair disciplinary actions toward children of color. The workshop will conclude with a discussion of how evidence-based strategies used in educational and therapeutic settings can support optimal developmental outcomes for children of color.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 201 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Leila Marchbanks and Karen Pritchet, Turning Point School (CA)
Anti-Racist Teaching, Training, Activism, and Allyship
End of This World: Using CRT to Dismantle Racism and Afrofuturism to Build New Worlds B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Ryan Coogler's Black Panther, Jordan Peele's Get Out, and the rising popularity of Octavia Butler's Parable Series have created a unique opportunity to engage our students in discussions about the issues that people of the African diaspora face. Discuss how we can use various lenses like Afropessimism and Afrofuturism to teach students about race and racism. Also look at examples of how to use Critical Race Theory (CRT) in a black studies course to examine the economic, social, and political state of black people throughout the African diaspora, and how to use problem-based learning to connect students in their local community.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 108
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Naa-Norley Adom, Carolina Friends School (NC)
Anti-Racist Teaching, Training, Activism, and Allyship
Algorithms for Hate: How the Internet Facilitates Bias, Radicalization, and Marginalizations in Our Schools B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: While people of color, women, people who identify as LGBTQ, and immigrants have always faced marginalization and violence from the dominant group, we are now in an era where computational algorithms are facilitating radicalization and spreading hate. Data-driven algorithms that facilitate the ubiquitous tools of the tech industry have been allowed to be hijacked by propagandists and hate groups. The rise of Islamophobia from a fringe idea to stated policy in the White House has been possible through online hate-mongering and political radicalization. Educators need to engage with this troubling reality for our students and ourselves as more of our lives become digital. Education for today’s world needs to include learning about digital citizenship, informational bias, and the mechanisms of algorithms. In this workshop, you will participate in activities used to help fourth-grade students develop an understanding of how the internet works so they can actively engage with information rather than passively consuming it. You will also see what a data-driven algorithm looks like and how it is used to serve propaganda.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 203 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Saber Khan, The Packer Collegiate Institute (NY); Camille Harrison, The Berkeley Carroll School (NY); Danah Screen, Horace Mann School (NY)
Anti-Racist Teaching, Training, Activism, and Allyship
Supporting Student Organizing to Dismantle White Supremacy and Drive Institutional Change B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: In response to student demands, in November 2016, Columbia School of Social Work (CSSW) institutionalized a mandatory course on power, racism, oppression, and privilege (PROP) as critical to shifting school culture and better preparing students for practice. This innovative course is grounded in the undoing of anti-black racism and centering voices of students of color. Presenters will use a timeline of the collaborative institutional change process, student-developed teaching tools, course evaluation, and experiential exercises to demonstrate the power of student organizing and the necessity of an anti-racist lens. In addition to detailing the process of systemic change at CSSW and the ways it can be adapted to other institutions, participants will experience parts of the PROP course firsthand and begin to unpack these concepts. This session will be particularly valuable for participants who are interested in moving student demands into action, professionals who work within historically and/or predominantly white institutions, and those who are concerned with the development of an anti-racist lens.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 202 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Ama Konadu Amoafo-Yeboah, Mary McDowell Friends School (NY); Sydnee Corriders, SRCorriders, LLC; Elise Jayakar, Social Justice Advocate; McKay Sharpe, McKay W. Sharpe, LLC
Anti-Racist Teaching, Training, Activism, and Allyship
Early Foundations: Viewing Our Educational Environments Through a Lens of Historical Trauma B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Explore what it means to look at the early childhood classroom and educational environment through the lens of historical trauma. Historical trauma is complex and has huge effects on institutional, community, and individual scales but is rarely acknowledged. By learning about the specific and pervasive effects that historical trauma has on African-American children, participants can begin to explore how this relates to their behavioral, social, and overall presentation within the classroom. In thinking about the effects of historical trauma on our youngest students, we are working to build a strong foundation for their positive development. Bringing the topic of historical trauma to the forefront of awareness will help us address these complex questions: How can we bring this knowledge into our classroom environments? How does it shape the work we do with the youngest members of our community?
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 203 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Lauren Snelling, The University of Chicago Laboratory Schools (IL)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
#bighairdontcare: Understanding Society’s Impact on Black Hair B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: What is the connection between slavery, hot combs, and #bighairdontcare? Why is there a nearly billion-dollar black hair care industry? This workshop will explore the political and cultural complexities surrounding black hair. We will consider how historical context shapes the aesthetic choices, professional standards, and social norms that impact black people. This workshop will provide language and tactics for serving as an advocate and ally and will promote a safe space for questions as we seek to better serve and support black students and colleagues.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 105 A-B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Nia Hays and Angela Brown, Dana Hall School (MA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Conversations About Supporting the Learning of Students of Color B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: This workshop will explore the biases present in conversations about the learning profiles of children of color. We will explore why conversations about how children of color are performing in school can escalate faster than those about their white peers, and how this can impact the school community as a whole. This workshop will discuss how to support parents of children of color in advocating for their children’s learning needs and navigating the framework of independent schools. We will share some protocols and practices we use to discuss students and the tools that help us check our biases and have equitable conversations about learning. Participants will engage in an interactive discussion to explore promising practices in supporting the learning of students of color and emerge with a shared understanding and group resources to guide these conversations. We will also share areas for growth that we have observed to inspire our colleagues to undertake the mission of improving practices to make learning more equitable for children of color.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 210
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Saara Mahjouri and Coy Dailey, Bank Street School for Children (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
The Spaces in Between: Embracing Our Multiracial/Multiethnic Selves B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Conversations about social justice often fall into the rhetoric of dichotomies—race (PoC vs. whites), class (haves vs. have-nots), citizenship status (noncitizen vs. citizen), etc. As our American society evolves, becoming increasingly multiracial and multiethnic, our independent school community identities are also becoming more dynamic. And yet multiracial/multiethnic individuals often feel that they must choose one identity so that they “fit” the discourse. This hinders progress toward productive movement, erases rich identities, and limits how they intersect with other identifiers. How can our schools move toward a more inclusive community for all identities while also moving toward equity? In this interactive workshop, participants will generate and practice coalition-building skills, bringing their full, intersectional selves to disrupt systemic thinking, speaking, and acting and to create stronger and more understanding communities.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 205 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Patricia Matos, Greenwich Country Day School (CT); Motoko Maegawa, National SEED Project, Wellesley Centers for Women (MA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Building and Marketing Your Leadership Brand: Navigating Psycho-Social Identities in Seeking Leadership Positions B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: This workshop will illuminate pathways to independent school leadership for PoCC participants. Participants will examine successful leadership pipeline programs that identify, recruit, select, and develop teacher leaders. The emphasis will be on how these programs impacted participants’ personal leadership journeys and their preparedness to promote social justice through the requisite knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed at different stages of teacher leader development. The presentation will highlight differences between principals’ and teachers’ conceptions of shared leadership by applying foundational theories of intentional recruitment and removal of barriers for aspiring leader candidates. Our conceptual framework of teacher leadership will incorporate the dynamic between professional accountability, recognition of expertise, and change agency within an overarching perspective of schools as complex networked systems that aspiring leaders seek to navigate.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 212
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Roberto Pamas and Regina Biggs, George Mason University/Education Leadership Program (VA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Assimilation: Necessity or Internalized White Supremacy? B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: As people of color, we are conditioned to compartmentalize our identity and to assimilate in order to be a “good fit” and be successful. However, there can be an inherent conflict between our survival, endurance, and success at predominantly white institutions (PWIs) and our identities as PoC. This workshop will explore the question, “Is assimilation a necessity or internalized white supremacy?” We will endeavor to unpack the assimilation process. What is the cost of assimilation? What is the alternative? What are the effects of assimilation on our students, ourselves, and our communities? The workshop will be facilitated by educators of color of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds and perspectives so that we may examine assimilation and its intersections. By creating a space for structured and intentional dialogue, participants will examine the nature of assimilation and be enabled to be their full and authentic selves: attending and working at PWIs and sustaining themselves within that process. Participants can expect to engage in partner and small-group conversations throughout.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 207 D
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Min Pai, Westland School (CA); Drew Ishii, Sage Hill School (CA); Stephanie Carrillo, Campbell Hall (CA); Ernest Levroney, Prime School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Healing Impact: Investigating the Intersection of Privilege and Marginalization for Men of Color B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: If you self-identify as a man of color, please join others in investigating the intersection of both our privilege and our marginalization as men of color. While acknowledging our marginalized experience, we will also learn how patriarchal thinking and socialization construct a rigid and privileged path for how we view and understand masculinity and manhood. Through activities and reflection grounded within black feminist frameworks, we will begin to heal from this patriarchal trauma so that we can reclaim our wholeness, recovering those parts of our identity we sacrificed to participate in the patriarchy. With this new understanding, we can plan how we can better listen, connect, and support other marginalized voices in our communities, specifically those of women of color and LGBTQ+ of color. We have nothing to lose but our chains!
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 209 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Dwight Vidale, Riverdale Country School (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
To Buffer or to Broadcast: Helping Schools Face Current Events in Nursery Through Grade 8 B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: From National School Walkout Day to violent images of confrontation between law enforcement and communities of color, elementary-age students are both vulnerable to increased anxiety and primed as agents of change. How do we prepare them with appropriate doses of societal realities to support their development in becoming informed and healthy high school students with an activated moral compass? What are some of the developmentally appropriate tools to help children navigate charged topics and manage their emotions while balancing social-emotional health and wellness? Two employees at K-8 schools (who are also parents of independent school students) and a licensed psychologist from a 9-12 boarding school will help participants begin to navigate these newly charted waters. Hear examples of institutional communication vehicles from school heads who have been in the forefront in responding to the discourse with mission-driven messaging without glossing over challenging dynamics. Leave with a Character Education Framework, an increased awareness of SEL (social and emotional learning), and confidence in knowing how to strike a balance between buffering and broadcasting.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 208 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Lynn Sullivan, Buckley Country Day School (NY); Holly Hinderlie, Choate Rosemary Hall (CT); Nicole Victor, The Children’s School (GA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
They Just Said WHAT? Helping Early-Career Teachers Learn How to Navigate the Trickiest Moments B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Independent school teachers are asked to cover a wide range of topics using a student-centered and student-driven approach. However, many experienced teachers know that diving into difficult yet important topics like race relations, gender identity, and sexual orientation also carries the potential for uncomfortable situations, particularly when students misunderstand, misinterpret, or make light of these topics. Learning how to navigate such moments effectively is critical, particularly for early-career teachers. Using a panel of experienced educators and administrators, this session seeks to provide a safe space for early-career teachers to seek advice, practice strategies, and share resources on how to turn these difficult scenarios into instances of growth for all students. We will cover how to prepare classes for sensitive conversations, guide students through emotionally poignant material, and debrief moments where students behave inappropriately so that everyone continues to find the classroom a safe and supportive space. Come with questions to ask, scenarios you would like to act out, and a willingness to share your experiences in the classroom!
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 207 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Anna Stern, Matthew Haber, Roderick White, and Nicole Jules, University School of Nashville (TN); Linda Tyranski, Wayland Academy (WI)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Shaping the Path: Strategies for Guiding Latinx, First-Generation, Low-Income Students to College B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: First-generation Latinx students from low-income backgrounds experience a number of challenges on the road to college. While many schools have developed goals around increased admission of Latinx students, the fight for equity requires a differentiated approach for this underrepresented group. In this session led by two Latinx educators, you will learn strategies for Latinx students that shape their path through the independent school experience. Topics will include clear ownership, affinity group support, financial aid systems, and college counseling tactics. Come prepared to learn from each other and walk away with concrete ideas for implementation.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 207 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Victor Cota and Alex Serna, St. Margaret’s Episcopal School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Belonging While Brown: Supporting Students of Color in Their Quest to Belong in Independent Schools B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Students of color at independent schools often experience tension between their racial identity and the culture of the school. This experience can negatively impact their feeling of belonging, or “harmony” in school, leading to racial dissonance or “discord.” The sense of belonging has been connected to better social and academic outcomes and is thus a vital element in a more equitable education experience. Stephanie Harris and Thérèse Collins both studied the concept of belonging while pursuing an M.S.Ed. from the University of Pennsylvania. In this session, they will share the challenges their students have faced in the pursuit of belonging at school and will invite you to workshop ideas on how to support all students’ quest to find their place.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 209 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Stephanie Harris and Thérèse Collins, Northfield Mount Hermon (MA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
The “Illusion of Inclusion” Community B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: With our current sociocultural-political landscape being desecrated by leaders peddling Orwellian concepts such as “fake news” and “alternative facts,” now, more than ever, independent schools must come clean and be honest about our true missions. Is your school really building an inclusive learning community for all its members? Or is it just as guilty of vandalism by building and selling an “iIllusion” of an inclusive learning community? With race-based data and other forms of institutional research as its scaffold, Greenhill School is using an adapted developmental stage model to ensure that it is building and maintaining an actual inclusive community as opposed to the illusion of one. Participants will walk away with a method for discerning fact from fiction in regard to our schools’ stated or implied intentions regarding diversity, equity, justice, and inclusion (DEJI) work; a framework for conducting and using race-based institutional research to promote DEJI work; and a host of effective facilitation strategies, techniques, and tips that can be used to turn our mission-driven and visionary-based aspirations into reality.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 106 A-C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Karen Bradberry, Chris Bigenho, and Lizz Melendez, Greenhill School (TX)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Transforming Ghosts Into Ancestors: The Psychological Case for Reparations to Descendants of American Slavery B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Author and educator Ta-Nehisi Coates has presented a compelling argument for the provision of material reparations to the descendants of American slavery, not just because of that history of enslavement but also for the discrimination that has endured ever since. In addition to this moral argument, there are powerful psychological reasons to pursue a policy of repairing a profound tear in the multicultural fabric of the country. In the absence of an “official” apology and the offering of “compensation” for damages, there exists a pervasive social toxicity that is powerful and invisible. This noxious, largely unconscious cultural dynamic invades the psyches of us all, contributing to challenges with anger, rage, terror, nihilism, anxiety, and social marginalization in African-Americans and fear, anxiety, shame, guilt, and controlling behavior in white Americans. These unresolved psychological forces have profound negative consequences for individuals as well as for the collective consciousness of the nation. We offer a psychological case for reparations to the descendants of American slavery that are also in the best interest of the country.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 214
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Medria Connolly and Bryan Nichols, Bryan Nichols and Associates Psychological Services Inc. (CA); Shakil Choudhury, Anima Leadership
Equity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
#RepresentationMatters B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: #RepresentationMatters is a workshop that focuses on the importance of a “windows and mirrors” approach to curriculum and resources for diverse classrooms. We will examine how the curriculum of a junior kindergarten classroom and a fourth-grade classroom, as well as an after-school program for first through fourth grades, supports students’ understanding of themselves. We will recognize how the understanding of identity evolves for children and how we, as educators, can support their growth through our own understandings of self. The presenters will share examples of resources (Teaching Tolerance, AMAZE, Responsive Classroom, Growth Mindset) and student work that allow children to explore their complex identities and that make safe spaces for children and adults to engage in difficult conversations. This workshop encourages leaning into discomfort and collaboration between colleagues in order to sustain a movement toward equity.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 213
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Rebecca Reaves and Sandy Voratanitkitkul, Latin School of Chicago (IL)
Equity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Experiences of Multiracial Female Leaders in Independent Schools B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Because multiracial students are the third largest racial group within independent schools in addition to being one of the most significant growing populations in the United States, it is essential to have an understanding of the multiracial leaders who will represent these students. The multiracial female leader, however, does not fit neatly into socially constructed racial boxes, and her life and leadership experience are less likely to be understood. A panel of multiracial female leaders in independent school will share their experiences, and their voices and stories will elucidate those of a population that has not often been represented in leadership studies.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 211
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Julie Taufa‘asau, Louisiana State University Shreveport; Audra McFarland, Belmont Day School, (MA); Lise Shelton, The Bay School of San Francisco (CA); Renée Thompson, Prospect Sierra School, (CA)
Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
Creating Leaders of Color Professional Learning Communities B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: “We want to hire leaders of color … there just aren’t any!” is a refrain heard all too often in independent schools. So we decided to do something about it. In this workshop, the presenters—two heads of school and a consultant—will share an overview of their Leaders of Color Professional Learning Communities program, which has served more than 120 educators and their schools since 2013. We’ll address these issues: (1) why affinity? why a program specifically for leaders of color is vital and effective; (2) the current and well-researched effective practices that our program integrates into its structure and content; and (3) the outcomes and impacts of the program. Whether you’re interested in starting a Leaders of Color Professional Learning Community in your own community or are looking for proven strategies to enhance your existing professional development program, we invite you to join in this conversation about recognizing and supporting the leaders of color in our communities for our mutual thriving and excellence.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 206 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Alison Park, Blink Consulting; Percy Abram, The Bush School (WA); Steve Morris, The San Francisco School (CA)
Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
Wakanda Forever: Microaffirmations to Support Leaders of Color B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Is your school an African oasis of technological advancement where ancestral veneration is practiced and women’s strength is respected and expected? In this presentation, we will explore how the intellectual-historical traditions of Africans and African-Americans can provide microaffirmations to support teachers and leaders of color through their journey in independent schools. Using the mythical country of Wakanda and real African cultural practices and beliefs from the Yoruba, Akan, and Ashanti, the presenter will highlight resources to inspire, validate, and uplift educators through their leadership journeys. Tools and resources for working with leadership teams, coaches, and teachers will be provided.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 201 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Ruth Bissell, San Francisco Day School (CA)
Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
Stand Out! Preparing and Distinguishing Yourself as a Candidate for Senior-Level Searches (Part 2) B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Standing out in a competitive search can be challenging. Distinguishing yourself as a candidate starts long before the interview and contact with the search committee or consultant—even before you prepare your materials. Find out how to prepare materials that stand out, understand search and interview expectations, and present yourself as the candidate of choice. What does this mean for you as a person of color? What do you need to know about a school/organization, search committee, or consultant? Get all the answers from a sitting head of school who shares his experience as a candidate and a search and recruitment consultant with extensive experience focusing on diversity, equity, and inclusion.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 102 A-B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Sherry Coleman, consultant; Luis Ottley, St. Martin’s Episcopal School (GA)
Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
Old School Diversity to 21st Century Cultural Competency B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: “I’m not diverse.” “Diversity doesn’t come up in math, so it doesn’t apply to me.” “Increasing diversity may lower our bar of excellence.” What is at the root of these comments? Examine the pitfalls of “Old School Diversity”—a deficit model that is based on concepts of the other, the savior complex, and window dressing. How do we frame our work as “21st Century Cultural Competency”—a value-added model that involves everyone, teaching and learning, school operation, and educational excellence? Participants can expect to (1) discuss the challenges of diversity work historically framed as a deficit model, (2) learn about the opportunities offered by cultural competency as a value-added model, and (3) learn how to make the case for cultural competency as an educational imperative that is everybody’s work and core to student learning. The workshop will include presentations, reflective activities, and several take-home tools.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 202 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Rosetta Lee, Seattle Girls’ School (WA)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
Closing the Chasm With Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Innovations: How to Get Everyone on Board B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: A few rock-star teachers in your school are using innovative practices for multicultural education. Now what? How might your school get these good ideas to spread? We draw inspiration from Geoffrey Moore’s book Crossing the Chasm about creating innovation throughout organizations as we share how we spread best equity practices from classrooms to divisions to the whole school. We started with one kindergarten class implementing “Who You Are Wednesdays,” devoted to investigations of identity. Using spotlights, pilots, shared reading, and other strategies, we transformed this practice into a routine across the Lower School division. Our students in grades 5 and 6 critically consume media and create their own animations pushing back against stereotypes. Our students in grades 7 and 8 are writing policies challenging systemic oppression. We find that collaborations between our best teachers, our technology coordinator, and our assistant head of school for equity, diversity, and inclusion help these innovations take root and spread.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 206 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Jonathan Fitcher St. Patrick's Episcopal Day School (DC) Erica Thompson St. Patrick's Episcopal Day School (DC) Samantha Fletcher St. Patrick's Episcopal Day School (DC)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
Reclaiming Innovation: Whiteness, Capitalism, Colonialism B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: The current language of innovation is a world view that espouses “the center” as white, het-cis-males, and capitalist and further marginalizes those perceived to be outside these identifiers. We know that those furthest from “the center” are required to be the most innovative to engage and survive in our society. In independent schools, STEAM, Maker Ed, Computer Science, and design thinking have ascended as priorities while diversity and equity work remains understaffed and underfunded. The technology industry has captured our imagination of innovation as the process for progress. Decolonizing innovation to include diversity as a cornerstone of the practice is essential and would strengthen both fields’ ideas and participants. Collaboration between diversity and technology departments would lead to a mission-driven transformation of schools, especially independent schools, which have often aided in the resegregation of America’s classrooms. In this session, we will use Thinking Routines from Project Zero, an education research group at Harvard University, to examine innovation through multiple lenses. Through small-group discussion and whole-group think tank work participants will develop and walk away with strategies to reimagine and reclaim innovation at their schools.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 205 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Saber Khan, The Packer Collegiate Institute (NY); Kerri Redding, Washington International School (DC); Danah Screen, Horace Mann School (NY)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
Head of School Track | Do I Still Have a Dream? How Can Heads of Color Advocate, Role Model, and Represent All? B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Recently, many issues of race, equity, and inclusion have arisen in this country. These are difficult topics for any school head to address within their school communities regardless of their racial and/or ethnic makeup. But these topics are even more difficult for heads of color to address in their schools. Race riots, black boys being killed by police, and people more likely to call 911 on their black and Hispanic counterparts for the most minor of offenses have become more frequent than not in American society. The changing political tide in this country places additional pressures on heads of color. How do we navigate these changing times, our changing roles, and the ability to be seen as advocating for all members of our school communities? How do we also protect and act as role models for our populations of color without being seen as unable to speak for and to the whole school?
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 208 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Ronnie Codrington-Cazeau, The Evergreen School (WA)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
Dismantling the Myth of the “Model” Asian-American Diversity Coordinator B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Asian-Americans who have been chosen to serve in diversity and inclusion-related positions often experience racialized tension between the perceptions of who they are and the realities of how they practice. When Asian-Americans have engaged in activist work and identities, they have received feedback such as “I didn’t realize you were going to be this political” or “I thought you’d be less active in race work.” What does this mean for Asian-Americans who identify as change agents and activists in independent schools? How do they navigate stereotypes, stereotype threat, model minority assumptions, and pressure related to their racialized identities? Join three experienced Asian-American administrators as they share their advice and struggles with racialized oppression in independent schools.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 205 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Liza Talusan, The Park School (MA); Amanda Friedman, The Hopkins School (CT); Ricco Siasocco, Ethical Culture Fieldston School (NY)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Killmonger’s Kuts: Black Boy Depression and Self-Harm in the African-American Literary Canon B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: In the commentary that accompanied the release of Marvel’s Black Panther, specifically around the character Erik Killmonger, there was a curious evasion. Few commentators spoke to Killmonger’s scars as sites of self-harm: reflections of trauma and depression that he has been unable to fully process. This perspective persists despite the fact that, across the board, black boys have higher rates of self-harming behavior than any other group. Use the character of Killmonger to discuss literary/artistic depictions of depression and its effects on black boys in the African-American cultural canon, looking at artists as varied as Paul Beatty, Junot Diaz, Flying Lotus, Jay Electronica, Richard Pryor, Langston Hughes, and others. We do so not solely to observe trauma and pain, but instead to explore how these boys negotiate pain and—when possible—rise above their scars.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 207 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: William Fisher, The Dalton School (NY)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Meditate and Destroy: Reclaiming the Voices of Asian Women in a Systemically White Mindfulness Movement B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: In this experiential session, we will break down what “McMindfulness” looks like in the educational world and whether the mindfulness curricula we use in schools are steeped in whiteness. We will discuss instances when mindfulness and racism intersect and when “mindfulness practice” can actually reinforce the model minority myth among Asian educators and students. Together, we will reimagine what culturally responsive and oppression-sensitive mindfulness education looks like at independent schools. We will also focus on one particular group of people—Asian and Asian-American women—whose wisdom and voices have not been included in the research and practice of mindfulness education and yet whose lived experiences are often authentically rooted in philosophies and traditions at the core of mindfulness. We will explore how to use the pedagogy of mindfulness as an anti-oppression and anti-racism tool for people of color to improve mental health. Lilia Cai-Hurteau is a certified yoga instructor and chair of the Chinese and Japanese Department, as well as the 2018 Faculty Fellow of the Brace Center for Gender Studies, at Phillips Andover.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 204
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Lilia Cai-Hurteau, Phillips Academy Andover (MA)
Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Nuestra Alma Latina: Nurturing and Embracing Our Latinx Soul B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: In this workshop, we will discuss how to create a safe and comfortable space that supports, empowers, and fosters a Latinx affinity group. Attendees will participate in activities that help develop solidarity within the group. Through these activities, we can help our students get a better understanding of race, ethnicity, stereotype threat, and racism. In this process, students become empowered through the exploration of their ethnic identity and their rich cultural heritage and traditions. This workshop will explore ways in which we can help our Latinx students gain tools and skills to navigate their school communities and have their voices heard.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 209 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Silvia Salazar, Crossroads School for Arts & Sciences (CA)
Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Building Mental Resilience and Reframing Self-Care B Thursday, November 29,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: When self-care is mentioned, it is often discussed in terms of replenishing ourselves so that we may be available and ready to help and serve others. For women and people of color who often find themselves taking on the extra work of supporting marginalized students on campus regardless of their formal roles, prioritizing mental health and emotional wellness is essential. This workshop will begin by exploring representations of self-care by prominent people of color like Audre Lorde, Zora Neal Hurston, and Janet Mock, in addition to examining different representations of self-care in popular media. We will then think through the pieces of these ideas that do and do not serve different groups or individuals in order to create our own personal self-care frameworks. Participants will leave with practical ways to track the basics of self-care that they can use and pass on to students when depression, school, or life in general feels like too much.
  • Block: B (Thursday, November 29, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: 202 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Kaela Farrise, Independent School Alliance (CA)
Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Incorporating Racial Literacy Through Courageous Conversations C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Cultivate an educational community committed to shattering silences around issues related to race and racism, and create a course for middle school students to develop racial literacy skills. Learn steps you can take to make racial justice a priority, particularly in the predominantly white K-12 educational space. Begin the process of developing short- and long-term goals and create an action plan that can be put into effect immediately. Create a racial justice curriculum, including a potential scope and sequence. Resources including lesson plans, texts, and research will be provided. Practical strategies will be offered for teachers and administrators looking to implement racial justice courses in their schools. Finally, a discussion on the boundaries and breakthroughs of racial-justice work, particularly in white-dominated educational spaces will ensue, including an outline of pathways for utilizing faculty and community allies and accomplices in support of racial justice work in schools.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 105 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Sonja Cherry-Paul, Teachers College of Columbia University
Anti-Racist Teaching, Training, Activism, and Allyship
Kintsukuroi: On Empathy and Other Things C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: This workshop uses performance poetry to discuss topics like diversity, vulnerability, mental health, and the need for empathy. The presentation is broken up into five slam poems, each covering a different aspect of empathy while examining the presenter’s own experiences with racism, depression, and small acts of compassion that changed his life. The workshop will conclude with a question-and-answer session to further dive into the topics discussed, along with ways to incorporate performance poetry into your community.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 203 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Andre Bradford, S.C. Says Poetry
Anti-Racist Teaching, Training, Activism, and Allyship
Negotiating Salary and Benefits 101: How Do Administrators and Heads of School Negotiate? C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: This practical workshop is for people of color to learn those best-kept secrets, such as how can you find out salary information so you are “in the ballpark” for salary negotiations when you are offered a senior administrative or head of school position? What are the additional benefits that senior administrators and heads of school negotiate into their contacts? And how do you negotiate once you have the offer? We will look at information from NAIS’s Data and Analysis for School Leadership on salaries, nonprofit 990s, and other resources as well as hear from our panel of experienced negotiators who have worked in various administrative roles and as head of school.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 202 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Johanna Aeschliman, Redwood Day School (CA); Frankie Brown, Sidwell Friends School (DC); Martha Haakmat, Brooklyn Heights Montessori School (NY); Alexis Wright, New City School (MO)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
White Supremacy’s Monopoly on Free Speech: Attacking Political Correctness to Silence People of Color C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: While the courts struggle to define the boundaries of the First Amendment as it applies to public schools, independent schools have broad powers to limit speech that runs contrary to their values. Despite this, students, parents, teachers, and administrators commonly defend racist words or actions by invoking a radicalized notion of consequence-free “free speech.” A related discourse focuses on the unfairness of “political correctness” and the imperative to treat all perspectives as equal for the sake of “balance” and “civil discourse.” This workshop will reveal these tandem discourses as the tools with which systemic white supremacy attempts to establish a monopoly on free speech, empowering bigotry while silencing the voices of its targets. We will also consider the role of independent schools in battling—or perpetuating—this form of inequity. The workshop will give educators an awareness of the structural biases underlying weaponized notions of “free speech” and “civil discourse” and how to productively engage with people and institutions that silence people of color in the name of the First Amendment.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 209 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Tim Rosenwong, Pacific Ridge School (CA); Rosetta Lee, Seattle Girls’ School (WA), Drew Ishii, Sage Hill School (CA); Alison Park, Blink Consulting
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Curiosity Emboldens the Cat: Posing the “Right” Questions to Address Race and Inclusion C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: This workshop offers teachers and administrators the opportunity to discover how the art of posing questions empowers schools to examine issues of race and inclusion, especially in environs where white fragility or colorblindness may be at play. Beginning with NAIS’s Eight Pillars of Identity as a basic model and drawing from a framework established by the Right Question Institute, participants learn how to use identity to ask questions of themselves, their curricula, and their institutions. These questions invite observations and pave the way for departments or divisions to pose formative questions, such as how to build a more stable and supportive community, a more diverse curriculum, a more balanced faculty, and a more representative reading list. Participants learn how to identify the data they need, present those data, create and evaluate desired questions, and finally push for answers and the next questions. The goal of our workshop is to empower participants to use identity and basic data to allow students and faculty to consider and reflect on their roles in enrollment and curriculum.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 205 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Rika Drea and Alan Barstow, Crossroads School for Arts & Sciences (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Beyond the Single Story C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: At Prospect Sierra, we believe that identity matters. Diversity of thought, identity, and culture leads to identity safety at school. Images of dominant white culture were typically present in our winter performance, and so we shifted our musical into an interdisciplinary cultural experience. This resulted in a project that provided students with windows to see out into the world and mirrors to reflect back who they are, critical in developing cultural competency. In our second iteration, students were immersed in Anansi stories from Ghana and the Caribbean. Our community of color felt seen in a way they had not experienced previously. This project also allowed the white allies within our community to lean into the discomfort this work can sometimes surface. Come to hear about our Anansi project from a diverse team of educators: our physical education specialist, diversity team leader, first-grade teacher, and division head. This project highlights how a school can bring visibility to its commitment to diversity, as well as shift school traditions to be more inclusive.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 210
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Maria Montes Clemens, Abby Guinn, Sandi Tanaka, and Zahra Jackson, Prospect Sierra School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Sticks and Stones: Exploring the “N Word” in Our School Communities C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: When the “N word” is used, what are the real effects on both the speaker and the listener? And what are the social consequences to consider when we choose to introduce this word in our classroom curriculum and personal lives? In this workshop, practitioners in the field of diversity will engage in critical dialogue around the history of the N word; understand the social, psychological, and emotional impact of the word; and discover ways to help their schools heal from, and move beyond, the controversial usage of the word in their communities.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 209 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Lana Bates, McDonogh School (MD); Marlo Thomas, Georgetown Day School (DC)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
A Practical Guide to Realizing Intersectional and Inclusive Learning in the Classroom C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Educators have been working for years to introduce diverse texts into the classroom. However, such strategies as introducing a book by a marginalized author, examining perspectives on climate change from various locations, and posing questions about institutional hierarchy are not enough. Intersectionality and inclusiveness can be used as critical lenses to approach any text or lesson, regardless of origin. But what does this point of entry look like in practice? In this interactive session, Homa Tavangar, author, researcher, and consultant, and Cara Hill, Brooklyn high school English teacher, team up to share, explore, and co-create with participants, offering a platform for critical inquiry into the ways in which we approach any text and curriculum, regardless of origin, and moving toward practical tools to realize intersectional and inclusive learning.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 212
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Homa Tavangar, The Oneness Lab (PA); Cara Hill, The Packer Collegiate Institute (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Culturally Responsive Math C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Using the Ready for Rigor framework, Zaretta Hammond’s book Culturally Responsive Teaching and the Brain: Promoting Authentic Engagement and Rigor Among Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students gives educators a neuroscience-based approach to closing the achievement gap. The Ready for Rigor framework consists of four strands: awareness, learning partnerships, information processing, and community building. Focusing on information processing, get examples of and strategies for making your mathematics lessons more culturally responsive. More specifically, learn to gameify, storify, and make it social, in accordance with the work of Jennifer Gonzalez, educator and blogger.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 108
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Marjorie Curry, St. Mark's School of Texas (TX)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Where Are All the Gifted Kids of Color? C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Black and Latinx students are significantly underrepresented in gifted and talented programs across the nation. In fact, black students are 66 percent less likely to be placed in gifted programs, while Latinx students are 47 percent less likely. The ramifications of this are profound as we consider how implicit bias and racism work to keep kids of color from the kinds of programming that challenge them and provide a path to greater long-term success. Even in independent schools, students of color are less likely to be seen as gifted and their behaviors more likely to be pathologized. This workshop will help teachers understand the unique ways that giftedness manifests and can be nurtured. We will review specific behaviors to look for, discuss what to do if a child is gifted, consider strategies for meeting the needs of such children, and talk about what schools can do to address the bias that contributes to why students of color do not receive the kinds of services and support needed for them to thrive.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 214
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Alegria Barclay and Hillary Freeman, The Nueva School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
And Equity for All: A Mandatory Exploration of Privilege and Inequity Among Adults at School C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: What does it look like to include every adult at your school in an exploratory process meant to engender introspection about race, class, and privilege? What are the challenges inherent in requiring your colleagues to confront their own biases? Through tracking two and a half years of whole faculty and staff “equity learning groups,” we will examine the obstacles and opportunities emerging from an ongoing process that seeks to engage community members of different classes, ranks, and statuses in conversation with one another about the equity imperatives of our school. We will confront the difficulty of equity work in communities that are comfortably hierarchical, especially when that hierarchy aligns neatly with race- and class-based divisions. We will explore the tension between being comfortably engaged and uncomfortably detached in order to find the balance between nurturing rigorous self-inquiry and provoking willful disengagement. Session descriptions, agendas, and other concrete resources will be shared. Participants will come away with a sense of how to codify the best practices and avoid the pitfalls uncovered in this case study.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 205 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Tanya Huelett, The Brearley School (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
A Seat at the Table: An Approach to Conversations From Different Political Views C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: On many campuses, educators are struggling with how to bring harmony to school communities with differing political positions during this divisive time in the United States. This workshop will explore strategies that allow room for harmony and discord to coexist. Instead of dancing around political issues, presenters will offer ways to create dialogue that brings together voices from across the political spectrum. We will explore how to allow space at the table for multiple perspectives on issues that are sparking local, national, and global unrest and that affect how we live and work in community. At this moment in our history, we are responsible as educators for taking on the challenge of having the difficult conversation. Join experienced diversity practitioners to discuss strategies on how to navigate these critical conversations to help promote understanding from varying personal and political beliefs. Find out just how to have conversations with conflicting ideas yet remain in community honoring our schools’ missions and core values.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 213
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Toni Williamson, Abington Friends School (PA); Yvonne Adams, St. Stephen’s Episcopal School (TX)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Students and Teachers Leading Together: Open Space Practice Helps Our Community Embrace Difficult Conversations C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Increasingly in our schools, we find ourselves navigating complex topics and experiences that affect our students’ daily lives. Often, impacted by lack of time, mounting pressures, and our current socio-political climate, we feel at a loss at how to make space for these conversations with vulnerability and transparency at the center. Aiming to proactively build the capacity of our community, our high school has embarked on a multiyear shared learning and leadership experience using a modified version of Open Space Practice. After participating in a series of trainings, triads of two students and one teacher served as facilitators in self-designed workshops with their peers and faculty as their audience. The slate of topics was generated by students and synthesized into 35 critical and challenging workshops such as “I’ve Got 99 Problems and the N Word Is One” and “The (Im)Possibility of Equity and Inclusion at a Private School.” Come and learn about this ongoing and transformational work that places the collaboration and leadership of students and teachers at the center.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 211
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Crissy Cáceres and Katie Gibson, Georgetown Day School (DC)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Tales From the Sleepy and Woke C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: “Tales From the Sleepy and Woke” is an interactive presentation of a recent Racial Intelligence Research Initiative (RIRI) aimed to engage parents of both white and brown children who attend independent schools. The RIRI took an in-depth look into how white families are processing and responding to the movement toward more equitable schools. It also provides verified and undeniable evidence of how brown families experience independent school culture. Participants will engage in storytelling, receive the RIRI final report, and enter into productive dialogue with thought leaders on diversity, inclusion, and equity.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 201 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Eugenia Blackmon, The Brown Parent Report (NJ)
Data Use in Activism: Evidence-Based Equity and Justice Programming, Research, and Evaluation
ComeUnity Coalition: Getting to the Social Justice Finish Line Together C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: As students read the news, they often crave safe spaces to discuss current events and to learn how to use their voices to advocate for justice. In fall 2017, Catholic schools in the Washington, DC, area created the ComeUnity Coalition, a space for students to process the impact of the violence in Charlottesville and other concerning events that occurred over the summer months. Based on our similar school missions, we join together to offer students the opportunity to bring those missions to life through monthly programming to learn about, discuss, and act on current events. Through teach-ins, letter-writing campaigns, lobbying, and “artivism,” ComeUnity Coalition has provided tools for students and adults who are passionate about effecting change to make their voices heard. We have built a sustainable program by harnessing the knowledge of social justice educators in our communities and the enthusiasm of our students. While we are each proud of the social justice initiatives at our own schools, we also recognize that we are stronger together.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 202 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Stacy Richardson, Georgetown Visitation Preparatory School (DC); Lauren Brownlee, Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart (MD)
Equity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Unlikely Partnerships Lead to Systemic Change: Technologists and Diversity Practitioners Unite! C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Technology has provided new opportunities for diversity, equity, and inclusion work in our schools. However, it has also created new outlets for trauma from a broad and often anonymous audience through bias language and images posted on mass media, including social media platforms. Diversity practitioners and technologists have distinct yet complementary skills that offer new insights into contemporary equity and inclusion issues that are unique to our digital age. During this session, participants will learn about leveraging specific partnerships to aid decision-making that de-centers racialized blame, aligns intent with practice, and promotes critical praxis through the lens of technology and collaborative leadership.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 206 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Liz Fernández and Kenny Graves, Ethical Culture Fieldston School (NY)
Equity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Going Global: On the New Periphery of Diversity Studies’ Theoretical Futures C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: When diversity studies are positioned in an international comparative perspective, traditional approaches to the field take on new excitement. This session will explore theories from other disciplines to stimulate a critical reconfigurative reflection on diversity studies. Traditional diversity studies have been focused on critical race theory, class, and gender. Over the last 20 years, other categories of identity were included—privilege, age, physical abilities, and sexual or affectional orientations. Diversity studies originally emerged with a discrete structural approach (that is, race is distinct from class is distinct from gender, etc.), but the field eventually embraced intersectionality, the idea that race, class, and gender are intertwined. However, diversity is approached with a dramatically wider interpretive lens in the courses the presenter teaches at the Canterbury School and Malone Schools Online. This workshop examines key theories that have largely gone missing from traditional approaches, including postcoloniality, colonial domination, hegemony, and the idea of complicity, postmodernism, and the matrix of domination.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 203 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: John Aden, Canterbury School (IN)
Equity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Young, Black, and Woke: The Experiences and Lessons of Three Women Teaching in Independent Schools C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Do you feel ostracized as a teacher? Have you wondered whether your age impacts your ability to effect positive change? Do your white colleagues seem to criticize everything you do? Have you been told that it’s not “your time” to lead? Do you spend most of your energy just trying to make it through the school day? If you answered “yes” to all of these questions, you might be a millenial black woman working in an independent school. While black women are an integral and necessary part of independent schools, we are underrepresented as teachers and leaders. Ladies, it’s time to get in formation because our students need us! Hear three millennials discuss their challenges and triumphs with navigating school culture and collegial relationships as they attempt to promote equity and diversity at their schools. Come to this session to vent, to learn, to feel safe, to find community, and, most important, to leave inspired!
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 201 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Shari Berga, Glenelg Country School (MD); Sidnee Mercer, McDonogh School (MD); Rakiya Brown, Gilman School (MD)
Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
How Did You Become One? PD and Best Practices for New and Aspiring Diversity Practitioners C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: The New York State Association of Independent Schools offers a yearlong, cohort-based institute to advance the professional development of current and would-be diversity practitioners. In this workshop, the co-directors of the Institute present a vision for sustained engagement with practitioners based on principles of best practice. Participants will learn how this model can be implemented with associations or groups in their own region and suited to their specific needs, and they will discuss strategies for diversity practitioners to further their expertise in a holistic way, including content matter, philosophical underpinnings, and practical application.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 207 D
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Yuval Ortiz-Quiroga, Saint Ann’s School (NY); Erica Corbin, The Chapin School (NY)
Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
Connecting the Responsibilities Between Trustees and Equity, Diversity, Inclusion, and Justice C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Trustees are tasked with protecting, and advocating for, the fiduciary health and mission of the school. Concretely connecting these tasks with concern for equity, diversity, inclusion, and justice (EDIJ) can be challenging. Trustees often describe their professional development around EDIJ as being either nonexistent or infrequent. At the same time, schools often approach their work in a cautious manner because they are uncertain of the position of their trustees. In this workshop, trustees draw clear pathways between their role and the EDIJ work of the school.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 207 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Lauren Brownlee, Sandy Spring Friends School (MD); Jen Cort, Jen Cort Educational Consulting (MD)
Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
Counteracting Implicit Bias in School-Based Decision-Making Processes C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: School leaders routinely make high-stakes decisions that significantly impact diversity and inclusion, such as which job applicants are selected for openings, which teachers are recruited for leadership positions, and which students are placed in advanced classes. Social scientists have long known that implicit bias—unconscious judgment grounded in stereotypes—mars decision-making processes while adversely and disproportionately impacting job applicants, teachers, and students of color. However, there is an emerging body of research on scientific interventions that counteract implicit racial bias. In this transformational workshop, participants will learn about four scientific interventions that counteract implicit racial bias: (1) designing selection processes for objectivity, (2) practicing mindfulness, (3) priming with counter-stereotypical exemplars, and (4) encouraging verbal perspective-taking. Finally, participants will draft a plan of action to counteract implicit racial bias in a high-stakes, decision-making process on the organizational, team, or individual level in their schools.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 202 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Julian McNeil, Teachers College, Columbia University (NY)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
From Diversity to Inclusion and Equity: Expanding and Reframing Your Institutional Strategy C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Diversity is the presence of different identities within an institution, and there is significant research that supports the idea that diversity is an essential component of excellent educational communities. However, when communities focus solely on “the numbers” and end their diversity work there, the potential excellence derived from diverse groups of people becomes elusive. This interactive session will provide frameworks, theory, and opportunities to explore practical applications to shift institutions from numbers-focused diversity work to systems and practices that foster equity, inclusion, and justice in diverse communities. Participants will leave this session with strategies, language, and a menu of options for ways to help stakeholders of all different backgrounds understand the need to do more than calculate percentages and to engage diverse members of the community in this essential change process.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 204
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Erica Pernell, Noble and Greenough School (MA)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
ABC stands for Asians Bridging Conversations C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: When it comes to conversations about race in schools, Asian-American and international Asian students are often excluded. Students lack visibility and voice in these dialogues, struggle to make sense of their own identities within the context of race in America, face questions of assimilation, and navigate questions of belonging. The lack of Asian visibility in equity and inclusion work is further compounded by the fact that Asians are among the fastest-growing demographic group in the United States, and more than 50 percent of international students are from Asia. Schools and educators need and want to bring Asian experiences into the conversation, but how? Join us in reflecting on how Asian affinity spaces, individual identity work, cross-cultural dialogues, and institutional shifts in thinking about equity and inclusion can create safer schools for Asian students. This work helps all constituents in schools build bridges and community through intersectional dialogue that is both prescriptive and responsive. Such bridges serve as ways to overcome gaps in awareness, create points of commonality, and establish pathways of understanding.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 101 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Tina Yen and Sheila Pai, Abington Friends School (PA)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
What Do Our Colleagues Say Then and Now: Recruiting, Retaining, and Empowering Faculty of Color C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: What can independent schools do to better recruit, retain, and support faculty of color? Ten years after our initial survey, what has changed and what has remained the same? A panel of independent school educators will explore the obstacles and the best practices needed to create an inclusive, nourished, and diverse faculty. This session will explore how to discuss and present these topics to senior administrators, trustees, and faculty as best practices. We will examine data collected from faculty of color at independent schools around the country and compare and contrast those data with the findings of the same survey a decade ago. This information can guide how schools understand the experiences and needs of faculty of color within independent schools and provide tools to recruit, retain, and empower faculty of color.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 207 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Pascale Musto, Middlesex School (MA); Lisa Sun, The Philadelphia School (PA); Ara Brown, Whittle School & Studios (DC); Nola-rae Cronan, Columbus School for Girls (OH); James Greenwood, Shady Hill School (MA)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
This Is America: Violence, Race-Based Disparities, and the Need for Social Justice C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: The need for social justice in education is self-evident. The increase in school-based violence, race-based disciplinary disparities, and the onslaught of negative imagery via the media demonstrate the urgency with which we must provide our children with strong support, guidance, direction, and protection. Infusing classrooms, schools, educational institutions, and communities with a culture of peace and justice may be what we need to create safe learning spaces that are beneficial to all. In this workshop, we will demonstrate how to use the principles of restorative and social justice to identify and combat existing and potential school-related injustices. We will discuss strategies for developing the skills for recognizing injustices and addressing them with administrators, faculty, staff, students, families, and neighborhood allies. The ultimate goal is to empower our schools by promoting and modeling behaviors that are just, equitable, bold, and uncompromising, while also developing skills and competencies for teaching and empowering others to do the same.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 106 A-C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Jeffery Menzise, Morgan State University (MD); Maati Wafford, Barrie School (MD)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
Head of School Track | Diversifying Your Employee Base: Creating an Environment of Wonder, Authenticity, and Impact in the Hiring Process C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: The Children's School has a local and national reputation as one of the most diverse schools in the association's membership. Faculty and staff demographics continue to lead local independent schools and are two to four times the national average. How has The Children's School been so successful in hiring and retaining faculty and staff of color when schools of similar size, type, espoused mission, and geographic area struggle to diversify their talent and employee base? Dive deep into cultural norms and practices, including those demonstrated during the cultivation and recruitment process, that have led to such transformative outcomes. Hear how the head of school reimagined the institution's recruiting process to get the right people on board and set up for success. Join fellow heads of schools in facilitated discussions and activities aimed at sparking your imagination and challenging assumptions that create barriers to racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity and inclusion.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 209 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Nishant Mehta, The Children's School (GA)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
Head of School Track | Leadership Lessons for New Heads of Schools: How to Advance Equity and Justice While Building Strong School Communities C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Diversity, equity, inclusion, and social justice are integral characteristics of a thriving school community. Yet how do heads of school, particularly new ones, lead in ways that support and advance these values and others in direct conflict with them (or perceived as conflicting)? How do you help your school community navigate forces such as stability and change, love of tradition and push for innovation, inreach and outreach, and concern for the individual and concern for the group? How do you keep a community unified when you trade elements of the literary canon for works by authors of color, reduce the number of admission seats for alumni legacies in order to enroll a more diverse student body, or alter cherished ceremonies to be more inclusive in tone and content? As they retire from their current leadership positions, two NAIS trustees reflect on their extensive independent school leadership experience around issues of diversity, equity, and justice. What has gone well? What has been in the way? What might they have done differently? What critical leadership lessons have they learned that can help you feel and be more successful? Don't miss this opportunity to explore tough questions, gain valuable insights, and share wisdom from your experience as well.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 208 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Jim Scott, Punahou School (HI); Jim McManus, California Association of Independent Schools
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
Beyond Crisis: From Disorientation and Discord to Peace C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: The educational system is oriented around a set of values and expectations based on whiteness. On a daily basis, people of color have a myriad of racial encounters that usually go unnoticed and unprocessed. There is simply too much happening in a school to attend to every moment of discrimination or every question of implicit bias. An incident occurs, major or minor, and before the brain has time to register what happened, we are off to the next event in the day. Over time, smaller, seemingly insignificant incidents build up until we reach a threshold of pain. Once the threshold is breached, we explode, resulting in a disorientation that leaves us feeling lost. To survive, we also disconnect from our own selves. But what if this disorientation is exactly what we need to find our true selves? This workshop will explore how moments that bring disorientation can be leveraged to take us into a greater awareness of our racial identities, clarify our vision for our lives, and transform our institutional experiences from powerlessness to self-determined success.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 208 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Binita Donohue and Stacey A. Gibson, Francis W. Parker School (IL)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Making the Invisible Visible: Valuing Unheard Voices C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Asian students, like all students, hope their voices will be heard; their racial and ethnic identities recognized, valued, and understood; and their cultural diversity embraced. How can we ensure that Asian-American students feel seen, heard, and embraced as members of their school communities? This workshop will explore one model for school cultural change that is working at the Spence School, a K-12 all-girls school in Manhattan. Asian-Americans often feel restrained from expressing their racialized experiences in independent schools, caught between being silenced either by the “model minority” myth or by the “perpetual foreigner” myth. These students feel that they should not make a big deal when encountering microaggressions and macroaggressions. This can cause real harm to their learning and even their health. This workshop will provide strategies for giving these students their voices.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 101 D
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Cynthia Ho-Donaldson and Rebecca Hong, The Spence School (NY)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Coloring in the Paradigm: Latinx Spaces in White Places C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Independent schools should see an increase in their Latinx student population in the near future. Nationwide, Latinx youth are the fastest-growing population, making up about 25 percent of all school-age children. These students account for approximately 15 percent of the population at private schools. How ready are these schools to welcome and integrate Latinx students into their communities? What can independent schools do to create brown “spaces” on predominantly white campuses? Schools will need to develop a broad understanding of space as going beyond physical dimensions to include opportunities for diverse students to experience, express, and assert their own identities. In this session, we will discuss trends among Latinx students as a way to better understand them and actively engage them. We will also discuss concrete ways of incorporating Latinx histories in the curriculum.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 207 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Marisela Ramos and Miriam Villanueva, Phillips Academy Andover (MA)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Laying the Foundation for Cross-Cultural Awareness in Early Childhood C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Supported by personal experiences and research on the importance of cultural representation in early childhood literature, two teachers present media, tools, and terminology to aid educators in creating environments that foster cross-cultural understanding and respect in their schools and communities. Explore the importance of cultural representation, learn ways to utilize media that cherish diversity in all forms, and gain the skills needed to craft a literacy curriculum intended to encourage sustainable growth in your classroom and school. Let’s give today’s students the skills necessary to be the culturally competent leaders of tomorrow.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 101 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Leslie Whitfield and Andrew Williams, Greenhill School (TX)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
From Dark Roots to Strange Fruits: Reclaiming the Black Beginnings of Old-Time American Music C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: America is a nation of great complexity and contradiction: slavery and freedom, black and white, rich and poor, North and South. On the other hand, our songs and the stories that surround them offer vivid insight into the mood of the times. Equal parts live concert and commentary, this workshop is a unique way of experiencing the impact of music on American culture and identity. Through his wealth of experience working with groups of all ages and his unique blend of Down and Dirty Blues, Socially Conscious Soul, and Spirit-Fueled Gospel Music, cultural activist and musician Eric Dozier takes you on a journey as he shines a light at the crossroads of music and American race relations by performing songs; discussing key musical figures; and masterfully wrestling with the themes of cultural erasure, representation, and America’s possibility of redemption—all the while granting visibility to those “black and unknown bards” who birthed the cultural foundations of American music from country to hip-hop.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 107 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Eric Dozier, Episcopal School of Nashville (TN)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Stories Matter: Using Literature as the Catalyst for Meaningful and Mindful Student Activism C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: What if students read and analyzed their local communities as they do Shakespeare? What if they leveraged this critical analysis to brainstorm, develop, and execute purposeful solutions to neighborhood challenges? Attend this workshop to learn about the New Community Project, a yearlong social entrepreneurship course and program that uses the study of literature as the foundation for social activism. Along with reading traditional texts, students partner with a local nonprofit organization to analyze the organization as a “living text.” We ask, “What are our nonprofit partner’s passions, motivations, and ambitions? Who are their main characters? Who is the antagonist? In what ways does setting impact the conflict? Does the story have a clear resolution? Where do we see the intersectionality of race, class, gender, religion, sexuality, etc?” By comparing and contrasting this “living text” with traditional texts, students learn, practice, and build solutions around the language of empathy. In this way, the New Community Project hopes to inspire and empower young people to impact their communities through critical thinking, mindful collaboration, and meaningful action.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 101 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Chidi Asoluka, Horace Mann School (NY)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Swing at the Mortar, Not at the Bricks: Teaching Equity, Activism, Justice, and Leadership C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: When students become passionate about issues of social justice and desire to tear down barriers to equity, how do we empower them to become agents of change and leaders in their communities? How can we teach students about systemic injustice and systems of oppression while also affirming and supporting who they are? Learn how one teacher used the Civil Rights Movement, the Chicano Student Movement, the Gay Rights Movement, and each movement’s contemporary counterpart as a way to examine the roots and repercussions of systemic oppression, unpack the power of collective action, and help students identify their individual strengths as pathways to activism. See how the principles of the SEED seminar, the social justice curriculum standards of Teaching Tolerance, and resources from Facing History and Ourselves were combined to create a class where students learned how oppressive systems are kept in place and discovered how they were each uniquely positioned to disrupt and dismantle those systems.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 101 E
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Stephanie Carrillo, Campbell Hall (CA)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Shaping Identity One BitLab Makerspace at a Time C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Makerspaces? Are they only for STEM? Whom do they serve? Could they play a role in student exploration of cultural and social identity? This workshop will share one school’s experience of using its Makerspace as a safe space to encourage student exploration and further define their social identities. Workshop facilitators will share how they created and implemented class projects in their African-American History Seminar and Honors Latin American Studies course to foster a greater sense of awareness, empathy, and cultural competency among students and the school community. Participants will hear from classroom teachers and the coordinator of the Makerspace as they share the ways in which they partnered to expand and facilitate student participation and interest in schoolwide diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives. Workshop facilitators will share their classroom projects and provide participants with a hands-on opportunity to create and develop their own lessons to bring back to their school communities.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 206 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Allison Ewing and Bryan Whitford, Bullis School (MD)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Harnessing Our Power as “The Only” and Leveraging Our Collective Enoughness C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: While independent schools have been making strides in developing and sustaining equitable and inclusive communities, what happens when you are “the only”? Join presenters Lilliangina Quiñones and Tony Hernandez who have been in the company of one in their independent school experiences. During this coalition-building session, come to participate in an exercise where you will get to practice Catalytic Decision-Making as a way to shift your perspective and establish a support network with other participants who are the only in their school. Not only will you leave with a way to leverage the group’s collective enoughness, you’ll be able to use the Catalytic Decision-Making framework right away in your professional practice.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 205 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Antonio Hernandez, Reflective Wisdom (PA); Lilliangina Quiñones, Trinity School (GA)
Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Recognizing Imposter Syndrome to Mitigate Its Impact on Your School Community C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: The Imposter Syndrome is a psychological pattern in which a person cannot celebrate his or her personal accomplishments because of overwhelming feelings of doubt and an irrational fear of being discovered as a “fraud.” Symptoms include an inability to complete tasks on time, request support, or acknowledge expertise/abilities as well as paralyzing and debilitating thought processes. Do you have students who start the year eager and enthusiastic but in the end clearly have not reached their full potential? Do you have a colleague who has a severe work ethic to match his or her talent but does not meet deadlines or commitments? Do you know a person who postpones applying for promotions or leadership roles despite a stellar pedigree? Perhaps he or she silently suffers from Imposter Syndrome. Recognizing and naming this syndrome is one of the first steps to understanding its impact on your school community. Via robust conversation, a turn-and-talk to discuss shared experiences, and a question-and-answer session, the diverse and knowledgeable panel will share resources and strategies for identifying and overpowering this quiet stressor.
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 105 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Gina Marcel and Françoise Saint-Clair, The School at Columbia University (NY); Monica Bisgaard, Kingswood Oxford School (CT); Priscilla Morales, The Park School (MD); Jason Craige Harris, Friends Seminary (NY)
Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Reclaiming Your Time to Thrive: Self-Care and Mindfulness Strategies to Help Faculty of Color C Friday, November 30,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Stephanie Akoumany will offer mindfulness, social-emotional learning, and self-care strategies to faculty and administrators of color who want to help themselves and their students feel more balanced and empowered when confronting everyday challenges, as well as microaggressions, experiences with racial tokenism, and implicit bias in independent schools. She will provide faculty and administrators with the tools to create a life centered on holistic wellness, play, self-efficacy, equity, community building, and social justice. This session will help faculty and administrators of color individually and collectively brainstorm how to thrive physically, emotionally, and professionally while working in independent schools, especially those that are not actively supporting the NAIS goals of creating equitable and inclusive communities. Dr. Akoumany will help faculty and staff rediscover the importance of emotional and physical fitness, play, healthy eating, self-expression, self-assertion, empathy, respect, and community building so they can thrive and be models of self-efficacy and self-actualization for fellow colleagues and students of color. This session honors the idea that happy, healthy, and empowered faculty and students can change the world!
  • Block: C (Friday, November 30, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: 102 A-B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Stephanie Akoumany, Bloom (MD)
Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
They Still Say “I Don’t See Color”? Dismantling Colorblind Racism From Within D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Many independent schools feature the same characteristics: a predominantly white adult and student body, an exclusive location, and a highly selective admissions process. Emerging in such environments, but often ignored, is the presence of a problematic colorblind culture: a race-avoidant tendency that directly or indirectly espouses a “post-racial” perspective. However, the result of such a post-racial perspective is the silencing of the stories of students of color, essentially closing off the conversation to marginalized perspectives. “Colorblindness” is an ambiguous concept and difficult to pinpoint. Workshop participants will learn about sociologist Eduardo Bonilla-Silva’s concept of “colorblind racism” as it applies to independent schools today and how seemingly neutral colorblindness negatively affects both people of color and white people. We will present key findings from a participatory action research project aiming to move an independent school community toward authentic inclusivity and multiculturalism. Change is tough, however, and it needs agents from within. Come prepared to discuss and ponder your school’s racial climate.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 105 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Asako Kurosaka-Jost, Alexis Harrell, Rob Jost, and Ryan Boccuzzi, Brentwood School (CA)
Anti-Racist Teaching, Training, Activism, and Allyship
Balancing the Equation: Integrating Math Education With Anti-Racist Teaching D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Math educators must take a more active role in the equity work of their schools. Traditional math sequences focus on teaching algorithms and problem-solving free of context. When context is included, it is typically borrowed from applications in science, economics, and geography. Common Core, problem-based learning, and other progressive math practices have not done much to change this. The result has been that STEM education in general and math education in particular have had little to say about systemic racism. When math educators remain silent about racism, they risk reinforcing power structures that alienate students of color. How can math teachers balance the pressures of traditional standardized testing, progressive math reform, and anti-racist teaching? This workshop will present a literature review as well as case studies of real lessons that were incorporated into a traditional math curriculum. Participants will begin the work of creating a lens through which to start thinking about curriculum design and revision.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 206 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Tao Wang, The Chapin School (NY)
Anti-Racist Teaching, Training, Activism, and Allyship
Taking Apart Racism: Using Maker-Centered Practices to Break Down Systems of Oppression D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: How can building a sensitivity to design empower our students to make change? Come and learn about ways that maker-centered practices can create opportunities to examine closely, break down, and eventually act on systems of oppression such as racism. In this workshop, we will “take apart” an ordinary object as a means toward understanding the complexity of systems of oppression and the ways they are sustained. Participants will leave with practical teaching tools that can be used right away in a classroom setting. Inspiration for this workshop comes from Agency by Design, an initiative at Project Zero, an education research group at Harvard University. The workshop leaders are actively involved in Agency by Design-DC, a public-private research project based in Washington, DC.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 211
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Jaime Chao Mignano and Mark Perkins, Washington International School (DC)
Anti-Racist Teaching, Training, Activism, and Allyship
Failing Our Kids of Color: When We Use Literature as a Weapon D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Many independent school teachers seem to be unaware that literature, as we currently teach it in our classes, can cause trauma to our students based on race, gender, sexuality, or economic status. In this workshop, we will talk about how literature can harm students, we will do some activities to help participants understand this trauma, and we will discuss ways to update our course curricula so that all students can actively enjoy what they read in our schools.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 210
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Aquita Winslow, Polytechnic School (CA)
Anti-Racist Teaching, Training, Activism, and Allyship
Creating Spaces of Empathy: Picture Books and Cultural Consideration D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: This presentation will empower librarians with tools to curate their collection with consideration of the population at their individual schools. We will look at the impact that such consideration can have in engaging the whole community. Librarians will be given tips for evaluating books and resources for finding diverse books. Attendees will see how the windows and mirrors that picture books provide can be a great starting point in curricular topics from pre-K to 12th grade.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 206 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Elyse Seltzer, The Park School (MA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Racial Equity Boot Camp: Left, Right, Left! … Let’s Step Into Wokeness D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: The 21-Day Racial Equity Boot Camp is a guideline of 21 activities that help build community and raise awareness about white privilege, systemic and institutional racism, internalized oppression, implicit biases, and other racial topics. The activities invite participants to self-reflect on the different topics and make connections to their school communities. The objective of the boot camp program is to bring awareness to all participants and create action plans that can bring about change in the school community that will create a more diverse, inclusive, and equitable environment. During this session, participants will work together as we explore some of the activities. They will learn how to create their own boot camp and adapt it to the needs of their school community. Participants are encouraged to bring a smart device to the session.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 201 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Silvia Salazar, Crossroads School for Arts & Sciences (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
“Reel” Identities: Examining Diversity and Inclusivity Through the Lens of Documentary Filmmaking D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: This session will take you behind the scenes of a high school documentary filmmaking course with two key goals: building cultural competency and developing students’ communication skills via the documentary film format. First, we will explore the ways in which students were provided “windows” into race and ethnicity across the globe through an assortment of award-winning documentary films. Second, we will examine how students developed “mirrors” for reflection about their own identities and communities and designed personal narratives through self-created documentary films. Last, we will reflect on the great opportunities and challenges when documentary film storytelling is incorporated to build students’ capacities for understanding, exploring, and embracing the identities and needs of marginalized racial and ethnic groups.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 203 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Bobby Mirzaie, The Ensworth School (TN)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Mo Money Mo Problems: Moving From Shame to Empowerment for Class-Privileged Students of Color D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Frequently, in the independent school space, we find ourselves assuming that our students of color are from low- or moderate-income families. What does it mean to be a student of color who comes from wealth or class privilege? How can students of color reconcile their activist beliefs and values with their class-privileged backgrounds? How do we move class-privileged students of color from feeling shame about their privilege to feeling empowered to act for the causes they believe in? This session will discuss case studies to facilitate conversations about social class with student leaders of color, as well as ways to design curricula that incorporate students’ personal experiences.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 201 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Andrea Pien and Zoe Bender, Bay School of San Francisco (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Black Skin, Rainbow Flag: Exploring Intersectional Safe Spaces in Independent Schools, Part 2 D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: People of color are often haunted by racist assumptions and stereotypes of the past. This reality is even more visceral when blackness is in question. There are two major stereotypes that have a seemingly pernicious attachment to black bodies in white academic spaces. For black men, it is the “Bojangles” image, a constant need to be nonthreatening, nice, and always willing to go along to get along. For black women, it is the “Mammy” image, the always approachable, nurturing, hapless one who is willing to do extra work with no extra recognition or compensation. These realities become further complicated when queerness is added to the mix. This portion of the two-part workshop explores two important topics: (1) the “Bojangles” and “Mammy” images’ continued existence in independent schools and (2) managing the intersection of queerness and blackness. Participants will leave the session with short- and long-term strategies and goals to manage their queerness and blackness and to create safe spaces in their schools and lives.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 203 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Stephen Wright, Latin School of Chicago (IL); Brandon Woods, Catlin Gabel School (OR); Shuntá Jordan, Pace Academy (GA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Kanye Was Right (and So Wrong): What Literature and History Say About Choice During Slavery D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Kanye was right: There was a matrix of choices facing enslaved African-Americans. The choices were enslavement, resistance, torture, or death. Each one of these choices involved layers of negotiated terrain. Some of those enslaved were able to maneuver their way into favored status with enslavers. Some of those who resisted enslavement escaped, and some spent a lifetime resisting within enslavement. Some of those who were tortured as vengeance for their resistance survived to pass on an almost supernatural resilience—as well as debilitating generational trauma—to their children. And some chose death over bondage. And yet, Kanye was so wrong. In his uninformed and oversimplified attempt to be a provocative “freethinker,” he muddied the waters of a conversation that America needs to have. This workshop will reveal some of what American literature and African-American history tell us about the complex and negotiated space of American enslavement and will provide students and teachers with concrete examples and resources that will spark informed and intelligent discussion about slavery.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 202 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Michael Molina, Gilman School (MD)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Introduction to Strategic Questioning: A Strategy for Learning and Change D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Strategic questioning is a technique designed to create knowledge that awakens possibilities of change. It is a process that empowers new questions, releases blocks to new ideas, facilitates people’s own responses to change, and creates answers that may eventually emerge although they were not immediately obvious. We will use case studies of real situations encountered in participants’ lives both inside and outside of school. Participants will learn to apply a systemic and structural lens to the process of addressing “issues” in order to consider them from multiple perspectives and analyses. At the end of this session, participants will have a powerful tool that can be applied in manifold situations to resolve conflict without finger-pointing, blaming, or shaming; move people to new understandings of the impact of their actions, regardless of intent; and effect change both personally and organizationally.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 213
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Shakti Butler, World Trust Educational Services, Inc. (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Rethinking American History: Creating an Equitable and Inclusive Narrative for All D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: The Trump Era has drawn national attention to issues of racism and race. While these issues have existed in the United States since its inception, the national dialogue has brought them to the surface, polarizing our nation and creating discord. As teachers of American history, how do we best respond to this? We believe that the goal of social studies education is to empower students to be active citizens who strive to improve the human condition. Using critical race theory (CRT) as a framework for curriculum allows us to guide our students to awareness, inclusion, equity, and empowerment for all. CRT enables us to challenge the dominant narrative and promote the voices of the marginalized and underrepresented. By teaching an inclusive narrative, we foster positive identity development and a more equitable school experience.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 214
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Ted Chen and Merissa Reed, Lakeside School (WA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Speaking in Queer Tongues D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Language involvement is a profoundly powerful symbol of community attachment. Gay vernaculars, argots, jargon, and dialects have been around for centuries. New words are continually invented and updated to refer to more recent cultural concepts, just like all languages with time. As more school-age youth come out of the closet, educators should prepare to hear and possibly read black gay vernacular in students’ written and verbal work. Just as with any other language or vernacular, it is important for the instructor not to alienate the child by telling them that their manner of speaking is incorrect. Like all discourse and vocabulary, not all words and expressions are appropriate for use in every setting. Therefore, the teacher must be tolerant and willing to teach the child when the language is best utilized or how to appropriately code-switch.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 108
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Ja'Ken Caston, Morgan State University
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Act Local: Creating a Statewide Diversity Network for Independent Schools D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Working in an independent school does not mean that you have to work independently. By creating a network of schools in your region or state, you can be part of something bigger, gaining and providing support for crucial progress in underresourced inclusion work. This workshop will focus on how to start and sustain a flexible and responsive nonprofit organization that caters to the specific professional development needs of the schools in your area and just around the corner. From regular faculty of color socials to intensive, day-long workshops with influential leaders and thinkers in equity work, your state needs you to look beyond the confines of your school’s triumphs and challenges and start a team with long-term goals—goals that can be reached as when independent schools work together.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 212
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Erica Coffey, Collegiate School (VA); Cynthia Lotze, St. Catherine’s School (VA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Students of Color and LGBTQ+ Clubs in Middle School D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: While many high schools have affinity groups for students of color and LGBTQ+ students and their allies, few middle schools offer the same opportunity. At Friends Select, we offer a Students of Color Club and a Gay, Lesbian, or Whatever (GLOW*) Club. Come to this session to learn how to gain support for these types of groups in your school. We will share successful activities, difficult conversation topics, and challenges we’ve faced along the way. (*Name borrowed with permission)
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 205 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Desiree Harmon, Naté Hall, and Fred Kogan, Friends Select School (PA)
Equity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
From I to We: Our Personal Stories Woven Through Integrated Curriculum D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: In this interactive seminar, we will explore how to incorporate young children’s personal narratives into the classroom using Bank Street’s model of integrated curriculum with social studies at the core. Our early childhood curriculum affirms each child’s identity and allows children to explore their larger community, both within their school and beyond. We will give specific examples of themes such as family, fabric, community helpers/changemakers, and neighborhood. We will also demonstrate how to differentiate in math, literacy, science, and art in a progressive early childhood classroom setting. Seminar participants will experience the curriculum firsthand and gain valuable tools to bring back to their school communities.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 202 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Jenel Giles, Kayla Wong, Evi Rivera-Williams and Elizabeth Jarvis, Bank Street School for Children (NY)
Equity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Illuminating and Challenging Implicit Bias in the Hiring Process D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: With more and more research recognizing the ways implicit bias impacts hiring and the rising concern about the lack of diversity of leadership throughout independent schools, Prospect Sierra School took the opportunity with its recent head of school search process to directly challenge implicit bias. Learn how the school engaged the head search committee, which included longtime board members as well as faculty and administrative representatives, in exploring the concept of implicit bias and illuminating the team’s own biases during the process. Learn and practice a variety of strategies to decrease the impact of implicit bias when hiring for all positions in your community.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 205 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Britt Anderson and Nathan Tanaka, Prospect Sierra School (CA); Jessica McCann, Brigham Hill Consultancy
Equity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Southern Hospitality Meets Virtual Reality D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: There are a number of schools in the country moving toward creating Extended Reality integration in their schools. As independent schools increase their investment in technology, it is important that these tools are used to advance issues of equity rather than creating more disparity. In this session, two seasoned independent school educators will share how their community repurposed space and provided teachers with training and tools to enhance learning. We will walk through the strategic partnerships that are important to establish resources and the professional networks schools need to integrate Extended Reality across the curriculum. Participants will leave the session with ideas about how to leverage virtual reality tools to advance their school’s mission around issues of inclusion, equity, and diversity.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 207 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Adam Mangana and Alyssa Finneyfrock, Jackson Preparatory School (MS); Vince Jordan, Lobaki
Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
A 37-Year Journey From Student of Color to Administrator of Color: Lessons Learned D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: After spending four years as a student of color in an independent school and 33 years as a diversity practitioner/director, this session’s presenter, approaching retirement, shares his experiences as a student in the 1970s and a “change agent” from 1983 to present day. Together we will explore various aspects of this experience, from supporting students to developing professional development models. We will also explore meaningful ways in which to engage our white students and peers/colleagues in this work. This workshop will provide an opportunity for dialogue across the various dimensions and responsibilities of an in-school diversity practitioner, examining the changes over a 50-year period in the area of diversity work and identifying and prioritizing the focus of the work as we move into the next decade. This nteractive workshop will allow plenty of time for questions and inquiry.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 208 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Lewis Bryant and Marissa Clark, Buckingham Browne & Nichols School (MA)
Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
I Should Do What? Identifying and Mentoring PoC as Aspiring Heads of School D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: “Why don’t more heads of school look like me?” In a 2009 NAIS study of headship, 5 percent of the respondents were people of color. By 2015-2016, this number had increased to 7 percent. In noting this small increase, NAIS researchers commented, “For underrepresented groups, research has shown the importance of having a career mentor and, in particular, a career sponsor. White men generally have better connections, which enable them to have sponsors. While mentors offer their knowledge, wisdom, and advice to someone with less experience, sponsors actively advocate for candidates’ careers and help them secure job opportunities and promotions.” This panel of rock-star school leaders will discuss being, becoming, and benefiting from mentors; the leadership programs and institutes they have created or participated in; and personal narratives about their paths to headship and division head. We will address these questions: Who first identified you as a school head, and how have you tried to pay this mentorship/sponsorship forward?
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 105 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Ricco Siasoco, The Chadwick School (CA); Nicole DuFauchard, The Advent School (MA); Jason Ford, Trinity School (NY); Mariama Richards, Friends’ Central School (PA); Noni Thomas López, Gordon School (RI)
Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
#FAIL: How Schools Mismanage Diversity Initiatives D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: There are five major components to managing complex change within organizations. This session will identify those five components and illustrate the results of not securing each one as part of the school’s diversity work.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 202 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Andre Withers, The Madeira School (VA)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
Behind the Veil: A Study of the Experiences of Students of Color at Independent Schools D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: The workshop will present the findings of recent doctoral research on the experiences of students of color who attend independent schools. The mixed-methods research study involved 525 participants from 74 independent schools in the Northeast who ranged from seventh grade to one year out of college. The findings presented in this workshop will illuminate specific areas of student supports and specific pain points. Statistical and narrative data will make the case for a reexamination of how we support students of color and engage the larger school community.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 209 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Jackson Collins, Prep for Prep (NY)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
It’s Our Space, Now: Improving Systems and Organizational Capacity for a Positive School Climate D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Even with the push for growth in diversity, many independent schools still struggle to support faculty and students of color as they acclimate to a private school environment. As more students of color grow up in or matriculate into independent schools, removing roadblocks that hinder academic and social success becomes paramount. How do we rethink systems that are in place to better support students of color? How can faculty and staff become more engaged in efforts to manage and reshape these systems? Using interview data collected from faculty and students in a two-year study of independent schools, we will discuss findings and walk through an organizational learning process that can help participants begin the process of creating or reimagining systems that will support the needs of students of color, despite the lack of diversity that exists in many independent schools. Participants will leave the presentation with a better understanding of how to assess their institution’s capacity to promote positive, supportive, and understanding environments for students of color across the independent school spectrum.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 205 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Joshua Childs, University of Texas at Austin (TX); Celeste Sanders, Greenhill School (TX)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
Head of School Track | Equity in Innovation by Design: Hiking the Path with Trailblazers D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Applying innovation design processes and systems thinking to equity and justice work is no small feat. It involves work that is difficult but rewarding. Join your colleagues for an in-depth look at how a few school leaders have embarked on their innovation journeys with equity and justice work at the core. Learn how they worked to engage others, overcome obstacles, and experiment with new ideas to make change happen in their school communities. Gain practical tips and takeaways for how you can do the same.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 209 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Damian Jones, Edmund Burke School (DC); Eric Niles, Athenian School (CA); David Fech, Winchester Thurston School (PA); Mark Mitchell and Tim Fish, NAIS
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
Head of School Track | The Future of Equity and Inclusion in Independent Schools: How Five Heads of School Are Leading Through Challenge and Opportunity D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: What are the most pressing challenges to your school's equity and inclusion strategy? Where do you see hope and how are you capitalizing on new and emerging opportunities? Join fellow school leaders Randall C. Dunn, Katherine Dinh, Ronnie Cozeau, Mark Reed, and Bernie Noe to discuss issues of equity and inclusion currently facing their schools and the future each envisions and leads in their communities. With candor and commitment, each school head identifies the major equity and inclusion challenges they face; how they are meeting those challenges; obstacles to success; and their hopes for the future. Conclude with reflections from audience members on where their schools are in their efforts.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 208 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Randall C. Dunn, Latin School of Chicago (IL); Katherine Dinh, Marin Country Day School (CA); Ronnie Codrington-Cazeau, The Evergreen School (WA); Mark Reed, Charlotte Country Day School (NC); Bernie Noe, Lakeside School (WA)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
Creating Resilient School Culture in the Age of Trump D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Since the beginning of the 2016 campaign season, there has been a change in tone and rhetoric in the national landscape that has spread into every institution, including education. Preschoolers through high school are hearing hateful, divisive language from everywhere including the White House. How is this corrosive rhetoric, which is the new political landscape, impacting our school communities? How is it impacting the culture of our schools? And, more important, how is it impacting students of color? In order to answer these questions, this presentation will examine not only the climate outside of the schoolhouse but the culture within. Using a resilience theory model, we will study the role of school culture as it applies to the policies and practices of the school. We will define the risks as well as the protective factors that influence the school community and use strategies from resilience education to help students of color achieve academic and social-emotional success within the independent school environment.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 207 D
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Tiffany Bridgewater, Louisville Collegiate School (KY)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Doing It for the Culture? Independent School Step Teams ... Cultural Appropriation or Cultural Appreciation? D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Independent school student step teams have gained popularity, considering its pop culture prominence in TV, movies, Coachella … and yes, Beyoncé recently staged a pseudo-college step show, imitating moves similar to those of historically black fraternities and sororities. In response, questions about cultural appropriation arise. Who owns these traditions? The art form traces its roots to the African continent and is a well-known cultural tradition of black Greek-lettered organizations (BGLOs). Understandably, students are confused about the balance between cultural appropriation and cultural appreciation. How do we clear up the confusion? How might we use the stepping tradition to teach students independence, self-awareness, leadership, and history? Should students who do not identify as black be taught how to step? Is this a cultural exchange, or are we allowing students outside of the culture to overstep their boundaries? This experiential workshop will compare and contrast the history and traditions of the past with the new styles of the present and explore the debate on “racial ownership” of the art-form.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 106 A-C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Shanelle Henry, Greens Farms Academy (CT); Antonio Williams, William Penn Charter School (PA)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
The Trump Effect Versus the Coco Effect D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: With the prevalent scapegoating of Mexicans in the current socio-political climate, educators of young children must find ways to resist messages of disdain and discord with a sense of urgency. Participants are invited to explore the following questions: How might we combat negative misrepresentation to encourage healthy ethnic identity development for children of Mexican descent? How might we engage in constructive dialogue against harmful stereotypes for the benefit all children? How might doing so plant seeds of hope and harmony for a more equitable and inclusive community? This session aims to provide an opportunity to examine the historical roots of anti-Mexican sentiment in the United States. Participants will walk away with integrated lesson plans, which celebrate the beauty of Mexico and Mexican culture through literature, writing, science, art, and STEAM design thinking projects.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 207 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Maria Blackburn and Alicia Williams, Providence Day School (NC)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Here and Now: Using Current Events to Cultivate the Next Generation of Changemakers D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: In these rapidly changing times, children see history created and new changemakers emerging before their eyes. All children take notice, some even marching with their parents for the #MeToo, #BlackLivesMatter, and #Marchforourlives movements. As independent schools, we have opportunities to dig deep through curriculum that strengthens the continuity between the world outside the classroom and the world within. Learn how lower school teachers at Park Day School use projects, responsive teaching practices, and discussions to support learning, identity development, community-mindedness, and greater social empathy. Topics include how to dive into challenging discussions and help children make sense of the myriad of information and conflicting messages they’re exposed to daily, while nurturing them at their social and emotional developmental level; how to help students develop social justice awareness and skills; and how to empower students to bring about change with voice and action. Video presentations, student work samples, and activities show how to make our living history accessible, meaningful, and relevant as we build a foundation for our future leaders and a more equitable society.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 102 A-B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Michelle McAfee and Susan Lee, Park Day School (CA)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Moving From Recognizing and Celebrating Latin-American Activists to Student Social Activism D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: With the increased volume of racist, sexist, and other xenophobic remarks and actions in our society, simply recognizing culturally diverse activists is not enough to combat centuries of oppression. Schools and teachers need to teach and support students to actively dismantle this oppression. In this session, learn how to open up conversations among students and adults in classrooms and in the whole school community about food justice, human rights, racism, sexism, privilege, exploitation, and corporate greed. Learn how to move students toward social activism through a comprehensive service-learning curriculum, which uses literature, videos, live testimonies, simulations, and projects to show students what it was like to be a child migrant farmworker in California in the past and what the working and living conditions are for farmworkers today. Students take this new knowledge and empathy and participate in civic engagement that includes a wide variety of nonviolent tactics for social change. Students learn how to inform and engage the public to act and persuade corporations and decision-makers to change unfair laws and policies.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 204
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Karen Compise and Lili Malabed, St. Paul’s Episcopal School (CA)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Token Hire or a Voice at the Table? #youngnumbandwoke D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: You are at the start of your career and at the beginning of developing your identity in an independent school: Whom do you need to know, what do you need to know, and why do you need to know it? In this workshop, we will share our experiences as young teachers of color and reflect on what it means to be an authentic educator and emerging leader in a not-so-brown school. We invite you to explore where you are on your journey and what the path ahead may look like as you work toward your professional and personal goals.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 207 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Kristina Abella, The Fessenden School (MA); Kate Thomas, Berwick Academy (ME)
Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
“Being the Right Kind of Black in Independent Schools”: The Remix D Friday, November 30,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Last year we began our conversation about “blackness” in our schools with a shout out to black females while focusing around our “I perspective” as black men. Often the behaviors of white men are viewed as confident, knowledgeable, and passionate in our schools. Meanwhile, the behaviors of black men are sometimes inaccurately viewed as overconfident, arrogant, militant, and hostile. We will build on those observations and presumptions by asking a female colleague to join us with additional data and analysis to expand this discourse. She will use short reflective activities and prompts to share the various ways black women have been hyper-surveilled and hyper-invisibilized within and beyond independent schools. These practices where black women and men are viewed as “cautionary” significantly impact our interactions, relationships, and ability to build healthy solidarity within independent schools. Participants will leave with strategies to maneuver white spaces, clarity on the ways blackness is surveilled and positioned for us in independent schools, and practices in critical reflection and connection. This workshop will be tailored to and centered on black experience.
  • Block: D (Friday, November 30, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: 209 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Charles Owens, Maret School (DC); Aaron Timmons, Greenhll School (TX); Stacey Gibson, Francis W. Parker School (IL)
Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Innovation, Design Thinking and Cultural Competency: Leveraging Math and Science Classrooms E Saturday, December 1,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: In our work to be excellent teachers, we need to acknowledge that we cannot nurture if we do not understand the individual nature of our students. Using the STEAM classroom as a model where students are challenged to innovate and explore, we will investigate how to bridge the gap between students’ realities and the circumstances students of color often face in majority white classrooms. This workshop will address how to help students understand their own identities in order to understand how and why they perceive things the way they do. Attendees will experience a hands-on lesson rooted in the design thinking and the engineering design process and will then reflect on their experiences. In the process, they will consider how their students would participate in these activities and develop curricular strategies for designing and executing culturally relevant pedagogy in their classrooms. They will leave the session with lesson samples, assessment rubrics, and the inspiration to begin to develop their own ideas for lessons.
  • Block: E (Saturday, December 1, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: 206 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Chandra Smith, Princeton Day School (NJ)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Real Talk Done Right: Engaging Our School Communities in Difficult Conversations E Saturday, December 1,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: In recent years our schools created programs that engage the community in conversations about race, class, and gender. The implementation of this programming has been a journey with different challenges and lessons we’ve learned along the way. Hear from a panel about varied experiences and strategies for implementing programs that engage our communities in meaningful and challenging conversations about equity and inclusion. Find out how to get faculty and staff to engage and lead in conversations about race, allyship, class, and gender. View the trajectory of student-led programming that addresses community conversations. Get sample lesson plans and take this opportunity to connect and talk with people who are trying to bring this programming to their schools.
  • Block: E (Saturday, December 1, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: 205 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Debbie Bensadon and Stephanie Wright, Lakeside School (WA); Mahtab Mahmoodzadeh, Overlake School (WA); E-Chieh Lin, University Prep (WA)
Equity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Creating Mindful Spaces: Increasing Social-Emotional-Political Awareness Through Baldwin and Black Lives Matter E Saturday, December 1,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: We gain a deeper understanding of the student experience by creating safe spaces to talk. Facilitating discussions about race, politics, and current events is a constant need in middle school. Teaching in Oakland, California, lends opportunity to teach in the now on a moment’s notice. This workshop will share the experiences of middle school students as they journey through discussions brought on by Raoul Peck’s film of James Baldwin’s book I Am Not Your Negro. Conversations are facilitated by two teachers in a traditional seventh-grade English class and during an informal weekly morning meeting. Discussions address equity, how much things have/have not changed since the 1960s, and the connection between Baldwin’s message and Black Lives Matter, as well as the impact of White Tears. We hope that creating safe spaces for students to analyze history and current events lays a foundation for equitable and inclusive futures and helps build the skills necessary for reading between the social-emotional-political lines.
  • Block: E (Saturday, December 1, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: 207 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Rebecca Carmona and CJ Lee, St. Paul’s Episcopal School (CA)
Equity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
Leverage the Digital, Install the Revolution: Intersecting Equity Work with Pop Culture E Saturday, December 1,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: It's 2018, has Beyonce made it into your curriculum? If not, we can get you in formation. Build a case for how to make diversity, equity, and inclusion more relevant in the lives of our students by equipping them with culturally responsive frameworks to analyze pop culture. Social media is instrumental in how we build connections with others and the majority of our students have a cyber presence that far exceeds what we experienced at their age. Although the internet and mass media come with infinite exposure to content, social media algorithms filter information already in line with one’s beliefs, narrowing perspectives and making room for confirmation bias. Instead of solely trying to find external ways to pop the cyber bubble, we educator, can leverage how our students already engage with the digital realm and embed social justice and cultural responsivity into their cyber bubbles. Tweet, snap, like, pin, and instagram the revolution. Let's make inclusion go viral.
  • Block: E (Saturday, December 1, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: 206 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Kofi Obeng, Catlin Gabel School (OR); Kwame Cobblah, Pike School (MA)
Equity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
What to Pack for the Leadership Journey for Women of Color E Saturday, December 1,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Women of color remain significantly underrepresented in independent school leadership, particularly in the roles of head of school and associate head of school. These two senior leadership positions require a range of experiences in independent schools, including that of a teacher, department chair, dean of students, and division director as well as knowledge about admissions, advancement, and overall business functions. While the paths to school leadership vary, having a working knowledge of these various aspects of school life is an important step to senior leadership for women. Cultural intelligence and cultural competency across communities, demographics, and geographic regions are also key components of independent school leadership. Join a conversation with two senior leaders who have served various independent schools across the country as they share both NAIS statistics and personal experiences during the journey and the often less-traveled road to independent school leadership.
  • Block: E (Saturday, December 1, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: 207 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Ayanna Hill-Gill and Sylvia Rodríguez Vargas, Atlanta Girls’ School (GA)
Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
Equitable Schools and Inclusive Communities: Harmony, Discord, and the Notes in Between E Saturday, December 1,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: As students transition from high school to college, psychological and emotional anxieties are often heightened. Through the lens of a college director of counseling and a high school college counselor, we will view and discuss ways that high school teachers and administrators can empower students to discover their voice and use their agency to successfully leave the safety net of their family of origin in pursuit of higher education. We will discuss common reasons why students need counseling services in college, focusing particularly on students of color and international students. Our session will highlight the relevance of representation in schools, successful affinity groups, and mentoring programs, and we will offer suggestions to help guide students and their families to supportive college campuses.
  • Block: E (Saturday, December 1, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: 207 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Naté Hall, Friends Select School (PA); Reggie Jones, Bryn Mawr College (PA)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
Communications Matter: Diversity, Inclusion, and Authenticity in Your School’s Marketing and Communications E Saturday, December 1,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Communications and marketing mistakes in representing diverse populations happen all too often in organizations large and small. These missteps can speak volumes about your school’s brand and, in the worst-case scenario, cause your school to go viral for all the wrong reasons. In this workshop, we will examine through discussions and case studies how to build a team to ensure that your school’s communications are diverse and inclusive and how to approach your communications and marketing with an eye toward cultural competency. We will walk through steps we have taken to portray diversity at our school in an authentic way, using examples to show how to take action to authentically highlight students in marginalized groups in marketing, even in schools with small populations of students of color. In addition, we will review tools, strategies, and platforms to ensure that your communications are reaching marginalized populations of the school’s constituencies.
  • Block: E (Saturday, December 1, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: 209 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Aja Jackson and Tiffany Ogunwuyi, Garrison Forest School (MD)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
A2+B2= All Voices Will Be Heard in the Classroom E Saturday, December 1,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: In this interactive workshop, we will focus on developing resources to empower students of color to find their voice in math classrooms and begin to actively participate in these courses. After a review of relevant research and statistics, we will provide our participants with useful tactics to encourage students of color to challenge themselves in math courses, as well as how to support these students with their advocacy process. Participants will gain the tools and resources needed to support students of color in overcoming the achievement gap that exists in the STEM fields. We will provide the tools that we use daily to enable students of color to reach their full potential at Berkeley Carroll. Educators for grades 5 to 12 will leave this workshop with strategies to reduce the achievement gap in their school and the resources to help teachers feel more confident in providing students what they need to succeed.
  • Block: E (Saturday, December 1, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: 207 D
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Amanda Finigan and Shahna-Lee James, The Berkeley Carroll School (NY)
Organizational Development and Institutional Change
Black Parents’ Racial Socialization Practices and Student Success in Independent Schools E Saturday, December 1,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: There is a need to better understand the psychosocial experiences of black parents in independent school communities. A parent’s personal educational experience can influence emotional feelings about school and potentially impact the way a parent socializes his or her child, both academically and racially. These experiences may play a role in how parents prepare their child for school academically and in terms of the experiences the child may encounter that are directly related to his or her social position as a black American. Parents’ experiences within their child’s educational environment may also impact these socialization practices. This presentation highlights an empirical research study that has contributed to this knowledge base by exploring the experiences of black parents whose children attend independent schools. The workshop will explore the racial-cultural experiences of black parents within the independent school community with a focus on racial socialization practices and the impact on children’s holistic experience.
  • Block: E (Saturday, December 1, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: 209 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Rashidah Bowen White, The Town School (NY); Ariel Zeigler, Yeshiva University (NY)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
“You’re So Exotic ...” How to Navigate Predominantly White Schools While Immigrant and Hispanic E Saturday, December 1,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: It is not easy being Hispanic and an immigrant in this day and age. This presentation includes two personal narratives of coming to America and navigating predominantly white educational institutions. Participants will reflect on their own experiences of race and nationality and gain insights that will help their students navigate through theirs. The session will examine stereotypes of immigrants, how they are created and perpetuated, and how to break them. Learn how the intersectionality of race, immigration status, and gender play into everyday experiences and how these can be used as assets in the classroom and in personal relationships. Discover ways to leverage Hispanic heritage to build bridges across racial divides. Participants will gain perspective and walk away with strategies to help build a more inclusive environment for these two targeted identities.
  • Block: E (Saturday, December 1, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: 213
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Catalina Martinez, De Smet Jesuit High School (MO); Paola Zavala, Incarnate Word Academy (MO)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Asian versus Asian-American: Uniting Domestic and International Asian Students E Saturday, December 1,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Many independent schools have increased their recruitment and acceptance of international Asian students: As of 2015, in Massachusetts alone, the five-year growth rate for international Asian students was 158 percent; in Rhode Island, 221 percent. Yet, these international Asian students are often at odds—culturally, socially, and politically—with an existing Asian-American student population. This workshop will examine how to create dialogue between these two demographics. Should the goal of equity and inclusion practitioners be to unify affinity spaces or to create separate ones? How do we involve Asian students in discussions of American racial politics, #BlackLivesMatter, or even affirmative action? Is there a need for a unified “Asian-American” political identity? We will also focus on institutional policies and practices that may need to adapt, given this changing demographic, such as admissions, college counseling, and residential life. We will learn strategies to empower ourselves as educators while also empowering our Asian international and domestic students.
  • Block: E (Saturday, December 1, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: 209 C
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Adrian Khactu, ‘Iolani School (HI)
Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Using Dramatic Play: While Thinking and Making Sense of Difficult Interactions Related to Race E Saturday, December 1,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: This interactive presentation will engage participants in learning more about the four square model used at the Bank Street School for Children. The presentation will include drama as a main source in building a better understanding of everyday interactions and microaggressions. The lesson presented offers both white children and children of color the opportunity to have sincere and honest conversations about race. The model experienced and discussed in this workshop develops anti-bias language and at the same time invites children to gain perspective about their identity, the identities of those who are not like them, and social constructs around race. Goals of this lesson include developing a positive racial identity and knowledge of how to be an ally/advocate for yourself, those in your classroom and the community at large. The three presenters come with a variety of experiences in their own racial awareness. Their collective teaching experience will provide participants with a wide range of perspectives and important tools for teaching children.
  • Block: E (Saturday, December 1, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: 214
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Maria Richa and Evi Rivera-Williams and Coy Dailey, Bank Street School for Children (NY)
Racial and Social Justice-Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Reclaiming Our Time: Lessons in Radical Self-Care 1 E Saturday, December 1,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Facing the realities of our lives gives us motivation for action. For you are not powerless. You know why the hard questions must be asked. It is not altruism, it is self-preservation—survival.—Audre Lorde. As people of color in independent schools, we are often called to “fix” the impact of preventable racial trauma. Those who claim our time do not realize the grip such requests can have on our spirit, especially when the silent and compliant alternative can be violent. This workshop is meant to serve PoC. It will explore the ways in which equity work is both self-care and a fight for humanity. It will guide you in keeping your promises to yourself for they matter just as much as promises made to others. With certified training in mindfulness taught by Jon Kabat-Zinn, the Omega Institute, and Mindful Schools, we will discover original tools for radical self-care. In the spirit of healing ourselves before healing our communities, we hope this is one of many opportunities to put yourself first.
  • Block: E (Saturday, December 1, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: 211
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Lauren Stewart, St. Martin’s Episcopal School (GA)
Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
An Intergenerational Conversation About Black Women’s and Girls’ Experiences in Predominantly White Independent Schools E Saturday, December 1,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Through the lens of black feminism, this project highlights the experiences of black women and girls in predominantly white independent schools. This workshop details how participants engage in notions of black feminism and also investigates how they navigate, resist, and flourish in this setting. The study examines how black women and girls cope with gendered racial discrimination. Observations at an infant through eighth-grade school, as well as in-depth interviews and focus groups, were conducted and analyzed through the lenses of black feminism and critical race theory (CRT). Black feminism situates black women at the forefront and seeks to assess how they take control of their experiences. CRT allows for analytical dissection into the gendered racial experiences of participants. This work critically analyzes the structures of race and power that are enacted, offering a counter-narrative that debunks mainstream assumptions. Their stories present the information needed to understand their experiences as valid and distinct. Findings show that black women’s and girls’ relationships are paramount to their success within the school and work environment.
  • Block: E (Saturday, December 1, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: 208 A
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Devean Owens, University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign (IL)
Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Black Male “Privilege”: The Highs and Lows of Hyper Visibility E Saturday, December 1,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: What is the daily cost of the experience of being a black man who works in an independent school? This conversation will provide a space to hear from a spectrum of experiences of black men who teach and navigate independent schools as both individuals and professionals. The constant push and pull of negotiating black masculinity and white fragility is taxing. Come prepared to hear about the job in addition to “the job.”
  • Block: E (Saturday, December 1, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: 208 B
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Brandon Guidry, The Berkeley Carroll School (NY); William Fisher, Trinity School (NY); Kenneth Hamilton, The Dalton School (NY); Dwight Vidale, Riverdale Country School (NY)
Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
What it Is: Teacher Therapy for Mind, Body, Spirit, and Soul E Saturday, December 1,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Participate in a group discussion, engage in a self-discovery exercise that includes journaling, practice movement to reengage with your body, and network in order to keep your spirits high after our session. Brainstorm networking strategies for using best practices in schools as we emphasize staying in contact, implementation of programming in schools, acquiring leader/administrator support, and documentation.
  • Block: E (Saturday, December 1, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: 108
  • Category: Regular Workshop
  • Presenters: Beatrice Sullivan, The Friends School of Atlanta (GA)
Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit