Welcome to our new Workshops at a Glance page! This feature will allow you to see all of the PoCC workshops in one place and easily sort, search, filter, and browse to find workshops that are most relevant to your needs at the conference. Click on the expand symbol to expand each entry for more information about each workshop.

 

 Workshops

 
  •   Title Room Description Block Track      
      Title Room Description Block Track      
    Women of Color in Independent Schools: Living Being Mary Jane Post-It LivesB409​When Being Mary Jane debuted on BET in the summer of 2013, women viewers all over the country either ... Workshop Session CSelf-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit​When Being Mary Jane debuted on BET in the summer of 2013, women viewers all over the country either fell in love with the lead character, Mary Jane, or wondered, “What is wrong with her?” For women of color in particular, the complexities of race, class, gender, and sexuality offered more varied and nuanced perspectives on the storylines that play out from week to week. The hallmarks of every episode of Being Mary Jane were the affirmations (and cautionary warnings) she wrote to herself on sticky notes as reminders of the life she wanted to live. Join us as we delve into our Post-It lives.​Veda Robinson, Edmund Burke School (DC); Stephanie Carrillo, Campbell Hall (CA); Danica Tisdale Fisher, Phillips Academy (MA)  
    Speaking From a Place of Strength: Black Lives Matter Dialogue from Personal Understanding to Community ImplementationA301With our world being torn apart, our psyches damaged and in the resurgent wake of extrajudicial executions ... Workshop Session ABuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social JusticeWith our world being torn apart, our psyches damaged and in the resurgent wake of extrajudicial executions of black and brown folk nationally, we need solutions all educators can pursue to make change in a violent world. Workshop participants will process and explore their personal understandings of Bryan Stevenson’s work within the context of the Black Lives Matter movement, using a framework of the interpersonal, societal, and historical levers that will help us to restore justice to all humans in our country. Materials from Bryan Stevenson’s Equal Justice Initiative will serve as a catalyst for this process and an example of how to promote dialogue and implement programs that will educate adults and children on how to make black lives actually matter. Finally, participants will have an opportunity to develop a plan beginning this crucial work in their schools and communities. ​Carol A. Swainson, Bentley School; Orpheus Crutchfield, StratéGenius
    Headed to the Top: New Study Reveals Ways to Increase Opportunity for People of Color and Women in NAIS Member SchoolsA407​How can school leaders and search firms ensure that candidates of color and women have equal opportunities ... Workshop Session BLeadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion​How can school leaders and search firms ensure that candidates of color and women have equal opportunities to reach the top roles in independent schools?  What recruiting dynamics help or hinder? What qualifications, levels of interest, barriers, and motivators exist among these aspiring leaders? Recent NAIS statistics show that just 7 percent of school heads are educators of color and only one-third are white women. Gain insight into the root causes of these disparities from a new NAIS study of search firms, search committees, and potential candidates. NAIS staff will share findings about the recruitment and selection process, the aspirations of people of color and women, and these candidates’ backgrounds and career paths. You’ll also hear strategies to ensure that your school’s next head search offers all candidates an equal and unbiased opportunity.  ​Amada Torres and Caroline Blackwell, NAIS
    Using Activist Assessment to Engage Students as Responsive Agents, Architects, and Partners in Their Learning JourneyB401​Assessment practices are most effective when they help students become engaged self-assessors, capable ... Workshop Session BBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice​Assessment practices are most effective when they help students become engaged self-assessors, capable of monitoring and regulating what and how they learn given specified expectations. This workshop introduces a holistic “self-in-context” assessment resource that helps learners — students and educators alike — develop the skills and perspectives to proactively engage in critical self-analyses, reflection, and reflexive praxis.  You will explore who you’re perceived to be as an educator in relation to your students and your curricular/co-curricular content. You will also examine how you can better assist your students and yourself employ internal and external feedback to make real-time adjustments in what you do (or don’t do) to improve teaching and learning. This session is geared to upper school teachers, curriculum specialists, academic deans, and other administrators.​Hazel Symonette, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Wisdom of Life: An Inspiration from Ancient Chinese PhilosophyA314 This workshop aims to change your perspective on yourself and the ways you view the world. Some revolutionary ... Workshop Session DSelf-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit This workshop aims to change your perspective on yourself and the ways you view the world. Some revolutionary ideas from Confucius and Lao Tzu will be introduced and used as tools to help make decisions when you encounter challenges and difficulties. You will take part in three sessions with different activities: knowing yourself from a perspective of Confucianism, knowing the world through the lens of Chinese ink paintings, and learning how to deal with real-life situations by reacting “spontaneously” — blending your rational (mind) and emotional (heart) sides into one. It is a life-changing workshop. Jie Wu, Atlanta International School (GA)
    The White Women's Guide to Teaching Black BoysB308Meet the forthcoming White Women‘s Guide to Teaching Black Boys. This online workbook was created to ... Workshop Session DEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next PracticesMeet the forthcoming White Women‘s Guide to Teaching Black Boys. This online workbook was created to help white women teachers engage in concentrated, focused inquiry around their relationships with black male students and the impact that race and racism have on those relationships. Attend this experiential workshop — which uses video footage from interviews with both white female teachers and black men and boys — see how it helps generate new avenues of reflection and action for white teachers.Marguerite Penick-Parks and Eddie Moore, The Privilege Institute; Ali Michael, University of Pennsylvania, Graduate School of Education
    The Courage to Be Our Authentic SelvesA404As people of color, we are conditioned to compartmentalize our identity, especially at work. There is ... Workshop Session DBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social JusticeAs people of color, we are conditioned to compartmentalize our identity, especially at work. There is an inherent conflict between our identities and our survival/endurance/growth/vitality at predominantly white institutions. Attend this workshop to hear from fellow people of color working in independent schools and predominantly white institutions. We‘ll explore together how we can be our complete, authentic selves at our jobs.Min Pai, Westland School (CA); Cornelius Minor, Teachers College at Columbia University
    The Black Immigrant Student Experience as an "African-American"A313 Immigrant students of African descent are often identified as African Americans by well-intentioned ... Workshop Session DRacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches Immigrant students of African descent are often identified as African Americans by well-intentioned white individuals and supportive African Americans. Whether immigrant students hail directly from the African continent or the Caribbean, they are besieged by a confusing and sometimes painful paradox; they experience an overwhelming desire to fit in as well as a contrasting need to prove they are different, more nuanced, and somehow better than African Americans. Learn how the manner in which adults in the community perceive and respond to this conflict can be the determining factor in how students can successfully reconcile the two. Princess Sirleaf Bomba, The Wheeler School (RI)
    The “Trump Effect” in Independent Schools: Supporting Student Diversity After a Racially Divisive ElectionA312Hateful rhetoric and attacks against people of color entered some of our independent school communities ... Workshop Session CBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social JusticeHateful rhetoric and attacks against people of color entered some of our independent school communities during the 2016 presidential election. As a result, students of color and student diversity initiatives have come under pressure. The way the media have rewarded the overt racism of the Donald Trump campaign has created an atmosphere where “political correctness” has been framed as a liberal tool to suppress free speech. Students who underscore microaggressions in juvenile humor are called hypocrites for allegedly being intolerant of conservative voices. This workshop will reflect upon what we’ve done to help our students of color during this election cycle, and what we can do to continue to support them in the wake of the election and the inauguration of a new president.Tim Rosenwong and Sidra Smith, Pacific Ridge School (CA); Marcus Chang, The Bishop's School (CA); Rosetta Lee, Seattle Girls' School (WA)
    So You're an Administrator of Color! Now What?A405Independent schools have made progress in diversifying their senior administrative teams. Yet in our ... Workshop Session DLeadership and Management for Equity and InclusionIndependent schools have made progress in diversifying their senior administrative teams. Yet in our first year, some of us find ourselves to be the only person of color with a seat at the table. This interactive workshop will help new administrators of color learn how to navigate leadership as “the only.” A panel of first-year senior administrators of color will share their experiences, challenges, and victories.Carla Haith, Dedham Country Day School (MA); Tresa Wilson, The Hockaday School (TX); Roxanne Leff, Town School (NY); Latasha Chambers, The Williams School (VA)
    Navigating "Ouch" Moments: Dialogue and Listening Tools for MicroaggressionsB407How do you navigate those incidents that offend or hurt, even though they may be unintended? Can you ... Workshop Session DBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social JusticeHow do you navigate those incidents that offend or hurt, even though they may be unintended? Can you reduce defensiveness, preserve relationships, and also stop the behaviors? Learn some of the obstacles to authentic conversations. Then discover practical strategies for what to do or say when you are the target of, witness to, or agent of microaggressions.Rosetta Lee, Seattle Girls' School (WA)
    Got Leadership? Your Unique Path to Discovering a Fulfilling Leadership RoleA408Do you want to be challenged in your work, and are you ready for more responsibility? Discover ways ... Workshop Session DSelf-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, SpiritDo you want to be challenged in your work, and are you ready for more responsibility? Discover ways to open your lens to scope out fields and organizations that aren’t currently on your radar and then find the right fit. After self-evaluation, hands-on activities, small-group work, and discussion, you will leave with deeper insights into what motivates you. You’ll also realize there are opportunities you hadn’t considered  and recognize potential obstacles to overcome or avoid. Having risen to leadership roles from nontraditional experience and employment, the workshop presenters have extensive experience. They will lead you through the process of self-awareness, reflection, and strategies for change.Ingrid Tucker and Rebecca Geary, Cambridge Montessori School (MA)
    Forging Ahead: Women in Educational LeadershipA304In independent schools, 68 percent of teachers are women, but only 32 percent of heads of school are ... Workshop Session DLeadership and Management for Equity and InclusionIn independent schools, 68 percent of teachers are women, but only 32 percent of heads of school are female, and less than 2 percent of those are women of color. Given this striking discrepancy, it’s vital to bring women’s talents to the forefront. Five female administrators of color will facilitate a candid, interactive workshop and provide you with a personal action plan to advance and lead in the independent school world.Maria Arellano and Carlaina Bell, Montclair Kimberley Academy (NJ); Boni Luna, Morristown-Beard School (NJ); Nichole Foster-Hinds, Princeton Day School (NJ)
    Dialogue Across Difference: Sharing Our Stories to Build Understanding and ConnectionB405We all know that meaningful dialogue is critical to making transformative change in schools and in communities, ... Workshop Session DBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social JusticeWe all know that meaningful dialogue is critical to making transformative change in schools and in communities, but how do we facilitate effective conversations? Join us to learn how to design dialogue across differences in race, class, gender identity and expression, sexuality, religion, culture, and more. Discover how Garrison Forest School has used this powerful approach to encourage difficult but important discussions with students, faculty, and staff. The school has even trained its young people to lead those conversations. Get ready to practice leading discussions during this session so you can best understand the many elements of dialogue facilitation and design.Jessy Molina, Garrison Forest School (MD)
    Beyond Curry & Cows: Teaching South AsiaA305Engage in interactive activities to explore the rich cultural diversity of South Asia. Discuss curriculum ... Workshop Session CEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next PracticesEngage in interactive activities to explore the rich cultural diversity of South Asia. Discuss curriculum resources on geography, history, religion, language, and the arts. The presenter will also address some of the complexities of teaching a culture that is “your own” vs. one that is not, as well as student perceptions of teacher knowledge.Nayantara Mhatre, Bank Street School for Children (NY)
    A Conversation: The Fluidity of Gender, Racial, and Sexual Identities in Young People TodayA412Young people are exploding the traditional binaries and boxes that society has used to define identity. ... Workshop Session DBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social JusticeYoung people are exploding the traditional binaries and boxes that society has used to define identity. As the understanding of gender, race, and sexual orientation as social constructs becomes more socially accepted, gender is no longer about being just male or female. Race is no longer about being just black or white. And sexuality is no longer limited to being gay or straight. Join this interactive conversation about the implications of these emerging identities and ideas in a school community. *This workshop is offered in two tracks: one for educators of color (Friday) and one for white educators (Saturday). https://padlet.com/vsavas/nwi3s5hrctyv Morgan Darby, San Francisco University High School (CA); Vanessa Savas, Cambridge Friends School (MA)
    Writing the Wrongs: Creating the Space for Important Conversations Through Slam PoetryA402By design, private schools are exclusive spaces. As we groom our students to become critical thinkers, ... Workshop Session CBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social JusticeBy design, private schools are exclusive spaces. As we groom our students to become critical thinkers, it is imperative to hear their voices and their experiences in order to transform these exclusive spaces into inclusive ones. This workshop will show how educators can create space for inclusive dialogues through slam poetry clubs and curricula. Performance poetry can create a vehicle for students to explore their own identity, connect with other students, and blossom into leaders and change agents. Ultimately, slam poetry can offer a megaphone to a group of marginalized voices that may otherwise go unheard.Nina Candia, The Madeira School (VA)
    What About the Content? Revising Curricula for Educational Equity Through Human and Civil RightsA316 Has teaching for social justice and educational equity penetrated core secondary school curricula? ... Workshop Session COrganizational Development and Institutional Change Has teaching for social justice and educational equity penetrated core secondary school curricula? If we are to fully serve our students, the core academic coursework cannot remain unchanged. In this workshop, you will analyze selected independent school curricula for principles of human and civil rights, address questions of student inclusion and access, imagine an alternate vision of what your own school might teach in the future, and identify points of access to the process of curriculum revision. Richard Kassissieh and E-chieh Lin, University Preparatory Academy (WA)
    Weaving Cultural Competence Through After School ProgrammingA302 This workshop will explore ways in which after-school programs can accommodate children with different ... Workshop Session CBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice This workshop will explore ways in which after-school programs can accommodate children with different interests: visual arts, performing arts, technology, creative writing, makerspaces, sports, movement, and homework help. Additionally, we will cover the significance of after-school as a crucial time for social-emotional learning, building executive functioning skills, and developing cultural awareness and competency. You’ll discover how exposing students to different teaching styles and enrichment models can lead to a more authentic model of diversity. Francoise Saint-Clair and Katy Saintil, The School At Columbia University (NY)
    Trustees and Heads Working for Diversity, Inclusion, and EquityA408An innovative grassroots program in the San Francisco Bay Area is bringing trustees and heads together ... Workshop Session COrganizational Development and Institutional ChangeAn innovative grassroots program in the San Francisco Bay Area is bringing trustees and heads together to enhance governance efforts and resources surrounding diversity, equity, and inclusion. Attend this workshop to learn how this program has identified vital areas of responsibility for heads and boards and to discuss cultural competency needs within any board. Participate in a generative discussion about what it means to be a diversity, inclusion, and equity leader in independent schools.Alison Park, Blink Consulting; Alex Wong, Town School for Boys (CA); Barre Fong, Katherine Delmar Burke School (CA)
    The Rise of Islamo-racism: Understanding, Teaching and Tackling Systemic Oppression of MuslimsB403 Students watch how we respond to terror attacks, the refugee crisis, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, ... Workshop Session CEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices Students watch how we respond to terror attacks, the refugee crisis, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and the rise of hate crimes against Muslims and those perceived to be Muslim in the West. When we are silent, they learn from that silence — learning who to have empathy for and who gets our indifference. While the process of racializing Muslims is nothing new, it often goes unexamined. This workshop will give you tools to have more nuanced conversations about Muslims as a racialized group and propose ways to empower students to solve current world conflicts. Melissa Mirza, San Francisco University High School (CA)
    The Right to Fulfill Their Dreams: Designing and Destigmatizing Support Services for Students of ColorA403 This workshop examines a case study highlighting the need for more professionals of color in independent ... Workshop Session CBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice This workshop examines a case study highlighting the need for more professionals of color in independent school support services. Drawing on the perspectives of a learning specialist, an advocate for students of color, and a counselor, we will share and brainstorm best practices with you about changing practices and techniques to destigmatize support services and ensure that all students are comfortable reaching out for support. Stephen Wright, Eleannor Maajid, and Pamela Buchanan Miller, Latin School of Chicago (IL)
    The New Face of African-American Literature: Teaching a Post-Blackness CurriculumB401 In a world where schools increasingly face discussions of race relations and #BlackLivesMatter, our ... Workshop Session CRacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches In a world where schools increasingly face discussions of race relations and #BlackLivesMatter, our students — both white and black — need the tools to understand and discuss the experience of being black in America. This workshop will look at strategies for making an African American literature curriculum feel more immediately relevant, using literature as a springboard to looking at blackness from a sociological standpoint. Come prepared to discuss what your school’s current curriculum looks like and learn about tools for upper school educators to implement partial or whole curricular change. One central focus of this workshop is how to safely move students from thinking to feeling. Malikah Goss, Lakeside School (WA)
    The Children are Watching: Developing Principled Relationships Between People of Color and White ColleaguesA405Given the long legacy of racism in schools, how do you ensure that the working relationships between ... Workshop Session CBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social JusticeGiven the long legacy of racism in schools, how do you ensure that the working relationships between people of color and white colleagues are based on respect and promote equity? This workshop’s presenters will share a case study about their 13-year partnership as well as examples from other teacher-administrator cross-racial relationships. You will examine the contexts, pitfalls, and transformations that can happen when you learn to speak with and not for your colleagues. You will also look at how teaching is enhanced by authentic connections based in both an understanding of and respect for racial identities and how they influence teaching and learning.Elizabeth Denevi, Mid West Ed; Mariama Richards, Friends' Central School (PA)
    Technicolor: Sharing Our Experiences of Transitioning into Technology and InnovationA315 Are you involved in technology in independent schools? Would you like to pursue career options related ... Workshop Session CSelf-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit Are you involved in technology in independent schools? Would you like to pursue career options related to technology? Come listen to a panel of people of color who currently work in this empowering field. We will explain what we do in our schools, share our unique stories, and offer advice and insights for others considering doing something technology-related in their schools. Most important, we will talk about the potential impact we have on the lives of our students as people of color in this critical educational field. E. David Miller, Lakeside School - Middle School Campus (WA); Gina Marcel, The School At Columbia University (NY); Tye Campbell, Far Hills Country Day School (NJ); Camilla Calkins, Lakeside School (WA)
    Teaching American History Through the Lens of Critical Race TheoryA401So many recent events have drawn national attention to issues of racism and race — the deaths of Trayvon ... Workshop Session CBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social JusticeSo many recent events have drawn national attention to issues of racism and race — the deaths of Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner, Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, and Sandra Bland, as well as the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement. As teachers of American history, how do we best respond to this? We believe the goal of social studies education is to improve the human condition. Critical race theory allows us to guide our students to awareness, inclusion, equity, and empowerment for all. Critical race theory challenges the dominant narrative and promotes the voices of the marginalized and under-represented. By teaching a narrative that helps students see and navigate the world, we can empower them to seek change and justice.Ted Chen and Merissa Reed, Lakeside School (WA)
    Stories from Home: Inviting Everyone Into a Diversity ConversationA408Although it’s not always easy to identify with a particular affinity group, it seems that everyone can ... Workshop Session CEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next PracticesAlthough it’s not always easy to identify with a particular affinity group, it seems that everyone can speak about the place(s) from which they come. In this workshop, we will demonstrate how to use the idea of “home” as the foundation for diversity work. We’ll guide you through a program that goes beyond storytelling; it uses project planning and tradition sharing to promote more authentic and open conversations about how we see ourselves, each other, and our schools. You will find a definition of home for yourself, use your personal exploration of home to better understand your students‘ stories, find ways to move the conversation beyond the classroom, and reimagine the way diversity is discussed in your own school community.Angela Balcita and Ileana Imhoff, The Park School of Baltimore (MD)
    Okay Ladies, Now Let's Get In Formation! Enhancing Ethnic Identity Development of African-American Adolescent GirlsA409 Increase your knowledge of ethnic identity development in African American female students and explore ... Workshop Session CRacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches Increase your knowledge of ethnic identity development in African American female students and explore how academic and social environments directly affect their overall health. Dive into related theories and empirical studies, which explore the correlation between ethnic identity development, academic achievement, and well-being. Come away equipped to integrate this knowledge into your pedagogical approach and incorporate curricula that improve ethnic identity development; reduce risk factors, poor self-concept, and self-defeating behaviors; and increase positive outcomes for your African American female students. LaNaadrian Easterling, La Jolla Country Day School (CA)
    No Ways Tired: Graduates of NAIS' Fellowship for Aspiring Heads Share the Road to HeadshipB308 Explore the stories of three female African American senior administrators who rose to school headships. ... Workshop Session CLeadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion Explore the stories of three female African American senior administrators who rose to school headships. They will share their experiences with the NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring Heads. In addition, they’ll describe their personal and professional journeys to developing a solid professional profile, building relationships with hiring consultants, and dealing with the inequities faced by women of color in the hiring process. Hear their strategies for embracing a leadership mindset, bracing for denial and defeat, and staying the course to headship. Donna Lindner, The Agnes Irwin School (PA); Brenda Crawley, Sandy Spring Friends School (MD); Kimberly Ridley, The Gordon School (RI)
    Moving Up: Career Advancement for Educators of ColorB402 Discover a process to create your own path to a fulfilling career and make intentional decisions ... Workshop Session CSelf-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit Discover a process to create your own path to a fulfilling career and make intentional decisions about growth in your current job. This session will guide you in identifying the right people to provide support, feedback, and inspiration for your development. Through role plays and scenario simulations, you will practice navigating conversations about augmenting your current job. Most important, you’ll gain a better understanding of when it’s time to move on from your current role or school. You will leave the session with a personal career map to guide you in important career decisions. Pearl Rock Kane, The Klingenstein Center; Mark Reed, Charlotte Country Day School (NC)
    Let's Get Real: Exploring Race, Class, and Gender Identities in the ClassroomB404 Two teachers, a black man and white woman, developed a method to facilitate healthy identity formation ... Workshop Session CRacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches Two teachers, a black man and white woman, developed a method to facilitate healthy identity formation in the context of a diverse learning community. They offer a series of teaching strategies to encourage conversation and personal reflection, enabling students to think creatively, rather than stereotypically, about difference. Find out how this model helps students learn to safely explore their race, class, and gender identities; share stories and thoughts with peers; learn more through reading and research; and ultimately take action to affect social change in their communities. Through empathetic listening, positive peer acceptance, the inclusion of diverse ideas, and critical collaboration, students can learn more about themselves, each other, and the world they live in. The outcome: Individuality and diversity flourish simultaneously. Martha Caldwell and Oman Frame, The Paideia School (GA)
    How Collaborative Leadership Supports Organizational Change, Strategies, and Conversations in a Diverse SchoolA301 The ability to collaborate within diverse groups is a skill our students must master to thrive in ... Workshop Session COrganizational Development and Institutional Change The ability to collaborate within diverse groups is a skill our students must master to thrive in our rapidly changing world. But how can we teach this fundamental skill if we are unable to consistently use collaboration ourselves in our daily work? This workshop will present a way to understand and engage in institutional collaboration using a principle-based leadership approach, the Collaborative Operating System. You can these principles and collaborative framework to better engage the collective intelligence of any diverse team’s thinking, engagement, and strategic problem-solving ability. Joanne Chu and Carri A. Carver, Woodward Academy (GA)
    Fulfilling the Dream: The History of Black Greek Leadership and the People of Color ConferenceA313 Thirty years ago, five educators (all members of Black Greek Letter Organizations) heeded a call ... Workshop Session CLeadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion Thirty years ago, five educators (all members of Black Greek Letter Organizations) heeded a call to action when the need arose for formal support of the roles, values, and voices of people of color in independent schools. Now we hope you’ll join us to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the first National Conference for Teachers and Administrators of Color in Independent Schools. Hear the stories, triumphs, and trials directly from those who were there. Learn why they are committed to preserving the history and legacy of PoCC, the successor to that conference and the flagship of NAIS’s commitment to equity and justice in teaching and learning. Shanelle Robinson, Friends Academy (NY); Antonio Williams, William Penn Charter School (PA)
    Family Leave Policies: Challenges and Opportunities for Working Parents in Independent SchoolsA314How can family leave policies in independent schools create a more equitable climate for faculty and ... Workshop Session CLeadership and Management for Equity and InclusionHow can family leave policies in independent schools create a more equitable climate for faculty and staff? In addition to providing data on current practices and policies relevant to working parents, this workshop is designed to be a safe forum for sharing resources and affinity group conversation. Through large and small group discussions, you will be encouraged to share your experiences, suggestions, and support for each other. As two working moms in independent schools, we are interested in improving the climate for our own families as well as yours.Angela Miklavcic, The Episcopal Academy (PA); Priscilla Morales, The Park School of Baltimore (MD)
    Developing Strategies to Support Students and Families of Color Through The College Admissions ProcessA404 This session will help school administrators and college counselors develop programming for students ... Workshop Session CBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice This session will help school administrators and college counselors develop programming for students and families of color, including first-generation individuals who have limited experience with college admission. Drawing on their wide range of experience working with diverse populations at the secondary and post-secondary levels, the presenters will focus on managing expectations and dispelling myths. You’ll explore topics such as developing productive partnerships with community-based organizations, finding appropriate school fit so that students thrive, and understanding the realities and misperceptions surrounding affirmative action policies in college admission. Khaliah Williams and Carolyn Middleton, The Berkeley Carroll School (NY)
    Colorism in Islam: #BlackintheMSA #BlackMuslimA311 For the last 15 years, society has focused so much on Islamophobia from the Arab and South Asian ... Workshop Session CEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices For the last 15 years, society has focused so much on Islamophobia from the Arab and South Asian perspective that we often forget that African and African American individuals make up 25 percent of Muslims in the United States. In this workshop, we will explore exclusion of African Americans from this religion by Arabic and South Asian Muslims. We will examine how these unconscious biases play a major role on independent school campuses and communities. Khadijah-Ali Campbell, Phillips Exeter Academy (NH)
    Auxiliary Workers: Portraits of Micro-aggressions Faced by Invisible Teachers and Their Work in Independent SchoolsA305 Independent schools often subtly exclude auxiliary workers by virtue of the design and limitations ... Workshop Session BLeadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion Independent schools often subtly exclude auxiliary workers by virtue of the design and limitations of their work. A school community may routinely overlook their overall contributions, talents, and stories for reasons that are varied and complex. This workshop is designed to encourage you to examine and assess your school’s community and culture regarding auxiliary workers. You will gain new insight for multicultural education, curriculum development, community building, and school leadership. Francoise Saint-Clair, The School At Columbia University (NY)
    Are the Numbers Enough?A406 Imagine that your head of school has just ask you to lead a task force to assess your school’s practices ... Workshop Session COrganizational Development and Institutional Change Imagine that your head of school has just ask you to lead a task force to assess your school’s practices in regard to equity and inclusion and also to measure the cultural competency of your school community (students, faculty/staff, parents, and more). Where do you begin? And what do you do when you’re told, “Our school is quite diverse. Why would we need a diversity practitioner?” In this session, find out how to get naysayers to see the value of focusing on the quality of a school community in addition to the quantity of a diverse populations. You will walk away with tools and resources to take back to your school that delineate what’s included in a diverse and inclusive campus climate. Terri Wallace, Quest Academy (IL); Jackie Wells, Maumee Valley Country Day School (OH)
    A Conversation: The Fluidity of Gender, Racial, and Sexual Identities in Young People TodayA407Young people are exploding the traditional binaries and boxes that society has used to define identity. ... Workshop Session CBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social JusticeYoung people are exploding the traditional binaries and boxes that society has used to define identity. As the understanding of gender, race, and sexual orientation as social constructs becomes more socially accepted, gender is no longer about being just male or female. Race is no longer about being just black or white. And sexuality is no longer limited to being gay or straight. Join this interactive conversation about the implications of these emerging identities and ideas in a school community. *This workshop is offered in two tracks: one for educators of color (Friday) and one for white educators (Saturday). https://padlet.com/vsavas/nwi3s5hrctyv Morgan Darby, San Francisco University High School (CA); Vanessa Savas, Cambridge Friends School (MA)
    “What Do You Really Do?”: Defining the Purpose and Professionalizing the Practice of Diversity LeadershipA303 Imagine what would happen if your school hired a chief financial officer who has successfully managed ... Workshop Session CBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice Imagine what would happen if your school hired a chief financial officer who has successfully managed a household budget but has no formal financial management training, no corporate or school finance experience, and no knowledge of accounting best practices. This would never happen, right? Then why does it happen when schools hire diversity leaders? This workshop will share a framework — grounded in best practices, diversity management research, and professional experience — that outlines five levels of diversity leadership in independent schools. Eric Polite, Leadership for Educational Equity
    “A Face Like Mine”: Structurally Including Asian Americans in Racial JusticeB408As issues of justice and equity become increasingly important, we as educators must build capacity for ... Workshop Session BRacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, ApproachesAs issues of justice and equity become increasingly important, we as educators must build capacity for activism and engagement. Like our schools, we play an important role in both advancing racial justice for Asian Americans, being aware of the racialized journey of Asian Americans, and building cohesion among marginalized communities. Together in this session, we will explore our individual journeys toward racial justice and our professional journeys in support of these issues at our schools.Liza Talusan, The Park School (MA)
    #POC4EachOther: Bridging Activism Between Communities of ColorA304 The powerful #BlackLivesMatter movement has transformed our cultural approaches to awareness, action, ... Workshop Session CBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice The powerful #BlackLivesMatter movement has transformed our cultural approaches to awareness, action, and advocacy. We see examples of solidarity and bridging communities of color in #AsiansforBlackLivesMatters and the historical work of Yuri Kochiyama. Why is it important to show up for each other? What do we do when others push back on race-centric movements? What does this look like in our schools? Join us to explore how we must apply an intersectional lens to our activist work and why the frameworks of whiteness and white supremacy created tensions in community-of-color organizing. Liza Talusan, The Park School (MA); Tinia Merriweather and Ricco Siasoco, Ethical Culture Fieldston School (NY); Rochelle Reodica, San Francisco University High School (CA)
    The Maker Revolution: Positioning the Learner as a LeaderA313 This workshop will use a case study and a simulation to explore the main tenets of student-centered ... Workshop Session BSelf-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit This workshop will use a case study and a simulation to explore the main tenets of student-centered making. The emphasis will be on the student experience and the Four Rs: research, reasoning, recording, and reflection. You will be given a template to create a sample plan to design and complete a project using the Four Rs as a framework. At the end, you’ll have time to reflect on the exercise to encourage a deeper understanding of the process. Markus Hunt, The Logan School for Creative Learning (CO); Christa Flores, Hillbrook School (CA)
    Strategies for Strengthening Self-Efficacy in African-American Male TeachersA303 Self-efficacy is your belief in your ability to succeed in specific situations. It is a deciding ... Workshop Session BLeadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion Self-efficacy is your belief in your ability to succeed in specific situations. It is a deciding factor in whether a teacher — especially an African American male teacher — will return to a specific position or reach for another inside a school. Teachers who feel competent, connected, and valued by their schools’ administrative teams report higher levels of job satisfaction. In this workshop, two African American male teachers with a combined 25-plus years of working in independent schools will discuss seven principles of self-efficacy. Additionally, they will provide practical strategies and insights around building self-efficacy that fosters a greater sense of belonging and worth. You will leave with ready-to-use resources to strengthen self-efficacy in African American male teachers at your school. Ayodele Harrison, Community Build Ventures; Stephen Brown, The Lovett School (GA)
    Speak Up, Not Over: Helping White Allies Move Beyond White Fragility to Real SolidarityA402 Explore how white allies can more thoughtfully engage in anti-racist work in post-Ferguson America. ... Workshop Session BBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice Explore how white allies can more thoughtfully engage in anti-racist work in post-Ferguson America. In this workshop, we will discuss how white educators’ tendencies to dominate conversations, monopolize emotional energy, and assume a “savior” stance can undermine effective allyship in our schools. Informed by current research and interviews, this session provides a framework for change and empowerment. The framework encourages white allies to break down barriers, build relationships, and create institutional climates that seek an end to racism in our schools and in ourselves. Candice Powell, Newark Academy (NJ)
    Rethinking How We Teach the Civil Rights Movement in History and LiteratureA408 The civil rights movement is frequently presented in classes as a triumphant series of marches and ... Workshop Session BBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice The civil rights movement is frequently presented in classes as a triumphant series of marches and peaceful protests that turned the tide against racial segregation and discrimination in the South. However, recent scholarship offers us a number of ways to open up that interpretation. Teachers can include a longer span of black activism, a wider array of rights movements, and the need for continued action today. This workshop will make a case for reframing the civil rights movement and provide tools to go beyond the standard textbook narrative and deepen students’ understanding of these struggles. Candace Chen, Benjamin Cullen, and Jason Chang, Bentley School (Lafayette Campus) (CA)
    Relational Trust: Social Capital for Engaging Civil and Human Rights Work in Independent SchoolsB402 This workshop draws from a doctoral study of how four heads of independent schools built and leveraged ... Workshop Session BLeadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion This workshop draws from a doctoral study of how four heads of independent schools built and leveraged relational trust with students, parents, and colleagues in their first year of school leadership. Although relational trust has been studied in public schools as an organizational dynamic, there is little empirical research on relational trust as a leadership trait, particularly for independent school leaders and teachers. This session will introduce you to this critical concept and engage you in strategizing unique new ways to increase your effectiveness as a leader. Gene Batiste, Gene Batiste Consulting
    Refugee and Immigration Stories: Strengthening Inclusive Community and Identity in a Polarizing TimeA410 This workshop will explore how one independent school, one community organization, and one public ... Workshop Session BEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices This workshop will explore how one independent school, one community organization, and one public school district came together to create curriculum and programming around understanding refugee and immigration issues. Presenters will share practical examples from across K–12 education that focus on building empathy in order to reframe discourse in one of the most politically divided counties in the nation. You will also have the opportunity to dive into a case study about how a fourth grade social studies unit on immigration in American history was transformed into a year-long service-learning and inclusion curriculum that empowered students as change makers. Clare Sisisky and Carolyn Villanueva, Collegiate School (VA)
    Rebranding Diversity Day: Engaging Students, Faculty, and the Community in the 21st CenturyA406 Does your school set aside a day for students and faculty to deepen understanding of themselves and ... Workshop Session BBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice Does your school set aside a day for students and faculty to deepen understanding of themselves and others through the lens of diversity and inclusion? Is it meaningful? Is it worth having? In this workshop, speakers from Colorado Academy will tell how a rebranding strategy won the support of administration, faculty, and students and transformed Diversity Day perceptions, engagement, and buy-in. The new initiative is PlatFORUM, a full-day conference that encourages and models brave conversation around identity and social justice. You‘ll walk away with relevant, realistic, and manageable strategies that can make celebrating and critiquing humanity a powerful, meaningful, and necessary experience. Adrian Green and Michael Davis, Colorado Academy (CO)
    Parent-Employee, Employee-Parent: Navigating Dual Roles Within Your SchoolA403 This workshop is for teachers and administrators of color whose children attend their school, for ... Workshop Session BOrganizational Development and Institutional Change This workshop is for teachers and administrators of color whose children attend their school, for those who teach or support the children of school staff, and for anyone interested in the complexities that arise in these situations. This workshop will explore how parent-employees navigate the difficulties that present themselves when they must switch hats from faculty to parent. This panel of employee-parents will also provide best practices for faculty who wish to work with and communicate honestly with parent-employees. Johanna Aeschliman, Brooklyn Heights Montessori School (NY)
    One of Few, Representing Many: The Cognitive Dissonance of People of Color in Independent SchoolsA404 What can happen to people of color who work in independent schools with only a handful of other people ... Workshop Session BRacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches What can happen to people of color who work in independent schools with only a handful of other people of color — or just one? What if few, or none, are in leadership positions? How does the system maintain white supremacy by operating on the idea that highly qualified people of color are rare and hard to find? What are the personal costs, pitfalls, dilemmas, and benefits of being one of a few in a majority white school? This interactive workshop will explore how being the token person of color can result in policing behaviors that injure both faculty and students of color. It will also provide suggestions for taking care of yourself while challenging and changing behaviors in your institution. Patricia Matos, Greenwich Country Day School (NY); Gail Cruise-Roberson, National SEED Project
    Now That You're Here, What Will Make You Stay?A312 Building from a study presented at the 2011 People of Color Conference in Philadelphia, this workshop ... Workshop Session BOrganizational Development and Institutional Change Building from a study presented at the 2011 People of Color Conference in Philadelphia, this workshop will explore more data and stories about the path for people of color at independent schools. In addition to learning why retention rates remain low for faculty of color, you’ll discover support sources and ways in which your school can be proactive about retaining a diverse faculty. The data will be helpful if you are in a position to work on ways to retain faculty of color at your school, including by getting ahead of the reasons they leave. Johara Tucker, Cambridge School of Weston (MA)
    Is It Getting Better? Exploring #BlackLivesMatter and the Civil Rights Movement with Middle Schoolers (5th-8th)A302 Too often, anti-bias education is limited to increasing students’ self-awareness and identity development. ... Workshop Session BBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice Too often, anti-bias education is limited to increasing students’ self-awareness and identity development. It is critical for students to understand the powerful impact of unchecked unconscious bias that results in violence and injustice. In this interactive workshop, middle school teachers will gain skills, language, and tools to design lessons and facilitate discussions that help students make connections between their own self-awareness and bias, the need for racial justice movements, and social activism. As a participant, you will act as both learner and teacher by engaging in small-group discussions and brainstorming how to adapt these materials and lessons to make them developmentally appropriate for grades 5 to 8. Rebecca Yacono and Mellisha Culpepper, Shady Hill School (MA)
    How to Explain White Privilege to Skeptics in One HourA314 Using a series of pointed questions, we will work together to create a graphic map of social groups ... Workshop Session BBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice Using a series of pointed questions, we will work together to create a graphic map of social groups based on locations and roles in U.S. history and society. You and your fellow participants will think together about which groups have not had access to rights, resources, and respect — ultimately revealing the social positioning and impact of white privilege and dispelling illusions of a level playing field. Once the graphic has been created, you will explore social dynamics, dominant cultural attitudes, and behaviors that perpetuate power and privilege patterns, even when best intentions are in play. Debby Irving, Debby Irving Racial Justice Education & Consulting
    Examining School Discipline Data Through the Lens of Implicit BiasA304 This interactive workshop will encourage you to understand how to uncover implicit biases in your ... Workshop Session BLeadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion This interactive workshop will encourage you to understand how to uncover implicit biases in your data-collection processes. You will role-play conversations with faculty around implicit bias, and you’ll also discuss real scenarios and ways to interrupt bias by establishing authentic relationships. Khadija Fredericks and Christine Fairless, St. Paul's Episcopal School (CA)
    Elevating Equity in Education by Countering Characteristics of White Supremacy CultureA311 According to a nationwide poll conducted by CNN and the Kaiser Family Foundation, 49 percent of Americans ... Workshop Session BOrganizational Development and Institutional Change According to a nationwide poll conducted by CNN and the Kaiser Family Foundation, 49 percent of Americans believe racism is a big problem in our society. Meanwhile, a New York Times/CBS News poll shows that nearly four in 10 Americans think race relations are getting worse. As an educator who believes in leading racially just classrooms and schools, you must  examine how your school’s policies, practices, and values may uphold components of white supremacy culture. During this session, you‘ll have the opportunity to learn how schools unknowingly promote white supremacy. You’ll also be able to develop short- and long-term goals to counteract this within your current role. Rachel Willis, Elevating Equity
    Deep Diversity: Using Brain Science to Overcome Us vs. ThemA409 What if your interactions with people whose races differ from yours are influenced by things happening ... Workshop Session BBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice What if your interactions with people whose races differ from yours are influenced by things happening below the radar of awareness, hidden even from yourself? Research demonstrates that — in spite of good intentions and fair-mindedness — our unconscious mind and automatic brain processes frequently favor those most “like us.” This creates racial blind spots and hard-to-see discrimination that is systemic, and it results in a society in which many hard-working people are unable to get ahead. Through this award-winning presentation, you will explore how influential the unconscious mind is in human interactions, the prejudice habits we’ve learned regarding racial differences, and the negative impact of racial blind spots in schools and the workplace. Using an interactive storytelling approach, you will explore the impact of racism and Islamophobia as well as the strategies that can reduce such biases. Shakil Choudhury, Anima Leadership
    Creating Beloved Communities: The Mission of Justice in Faith-Based SchoolsA315 As seen through his mission to realize the beloved community, Martin Luther King Jr.‘s particular ... Workshop Session BEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices As seen through his mission to realize the beloved community, Martin Luther King Jr.‘s particular religious identity demanded the pursuit of universal justice. What would it look like for faith-based schools to follow his lead? By examining case studies involving a humanities teacher, a chorus director, an admission head, and a chaplain, this session will discuss pedagogic and administrative strategies that help bring the work of justice and diversity into the foreground as a necessary expression of religious identity. Come participate in one of the small groups during this interactive workshop and exchange ideas on how your school can center its curriculum, chaplaincy, admission program, or administration around a faithful mission of justice. Timothy Seamans, Beth-Sarah Wright, Keith White, and Joel Thompson, Holy Innocents' Episcopal School (GA)
    Changing the Race Dance Part TwoB404 In the second part of this workshop, we’ll continue to have creative conversations that shift personal ... Workshop Session BEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices In the second part of this workshop, we’ll continue to have creative conversations that shift personal and group racism. As in Part 1, we’ll incorporate movement, voice, story sharing, and stillness as we use an embodied education model called InterPlay to help ourselves both dignify and address the way racism injures and separates bodies. Cynthia Winton-Henry and Soyinka Rahim, InterPlay
    Changing the Race Dance Part OneB404 This workshop offers creative conversations that shift personal and group racism. By incorporating ... Workshop Session BEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices This workshop offers creative conversations that shift personal and group racism. By incorporating our human birthright practices of movement, voice, story sharing, and stillness, this workshop introduces an embodied education model called InterPlay that helps you both dignify and address the way racism injures and separates bodies. As we discover ways to breathe, shake out, move, sing, and share stories to liberate and transform the struggle, we find our way back to the wisdom of the body in the whole group, in smaller groupings, and in pairs. After playing, we’ll take time to notice and unpack what our bodies know and don’t know about racism. Cynthia Winton-Henry and Soyinka Rahim, InterPlay
    Can Code Switching Go Too Far? An Exploration of Cultural Identity Development in Independent SchoolsA316Code switching has commonly been defined as the practice of switching between languages or dialects, ... Workshop Session BSelf-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, SpiritCode switching has commonly been defined as the practice of switching between languages or dialects, but the term can be applied more broadly to include all forms of verbal and physical communication. At this workshop, explore the connection between code switching and authenticity, as well as the the rewards and costs of code switching to individuals within the cultural environment of independent schools.Brandie Melendez, The Berkeley Carroll School (NY); Mariama Richards, Friends' Central School (PA)
    Building the Beloved Community Through Social ActionB308 What does it take to work toward realizing Martin Luther King’s dream of the beloved community? Adaptive ... Workshop Session BBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice What does it take to work toward realizing Martin Luther King’s dream of the beloved community? Adaptive self-empowerment, appreciation of community cultural wealth, and an understanding of solidarity. In this workshop, discover models for applying critical race theory and best practices in community engagement to empower students to see themselves as change agents for justice. You will learn how to shape assignments that encourage students to engage with the world beyond the classroom, including partnering with nonprofit organizations. You‘ll also get tips on how to collaborate on schoolwide endeavors — such as engaging diversity days and student-led community discussions on social justice topics — to build the beloved community. Lauren Brownlee, Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart (MD); Shields Sundberg, Sidwell Friends School (DC)
    Building a Gender Inclusive Community From the Bottom Up and the Top DownA301 In its 2015–2020 strategic plan, Prospect Sierra School envisioned a community where “everyone thrives.” ... Workshop Session BOrganizational Development and Institutional Change In its 2015–2020 strategic plan, Prospect Sierra School envisioned a community where “everyone thrives.” The school has made significant strides toward becoming an identity-safe community for everyone, with a specific focus on gender. In this session, you’ll hear stories to inspire you to act and learn strategies you can take back to school leadership to effect change.Learn how Prospect Sierra has increased identify safety in the school and the community through ongoing professional development, the active middle school gender and sexuality awareness group, and administrative commitments to build gender-neutral bathrooms. Also hear about how running its first summer day camp for gender-diverse kids has broadened Prospect Sierra’s work in the greater community. Britt Anderson, Katherine Dinh, Sandra Collins, and Jessica Walker, Prospect Sierra School (CA)
    Asian Privilege and Its DiscontentsA405 Historically, Asian Americans have been labeled the “model minority” who work hard to excel academically ... Workshop Session BRacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches Historically, Asian Americans have been labeled the “model minority” who work hard to excel academically and professionally. In this workshop, we will explore the many aspects of privilege that Asian Americans experience due to their unique positioning within the United States’ racial hierarchy — but also the discontents associated with this status. We will examine how Asian Americans can make use of this privilege within predominantly white institutions in the service of equity for all. And we will discuss how Asian Americans suffer from a lack of recognition and respect from other racial minority groups, and how to build a stronger sense of interracial solidarity. Drew Ishii, Sage Hill School (CA); Radhika Khandelwal, Brentwood School (CA); Steven Lee, Edmund Burke School (DC); Cheryl Ting, Redwood Day School (CA)
    ¡No Más!: Integrating Topics of Social Justice into the High School Spanish ClassroomB403 Attend this workshop to learn specific strategies to incorporate topics of social justice in your ... Workshop Session BEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices Attend this workshop to learn specific strategies to incorporate topics of social justice in your Spanish classes. We will discuss Afro-Latin identity, Argentina’s Dirty War, Pinochet’s dictatorship, Bolivia’s Water War, and immigration routes to the north. The two presenters will share tried-and-true techniques to enhance students’ understanding of past and current world events in the context of their language class. Elena Tello and Ciara McGrath, University Preparatory Academy (WA)
    Words of Wisdom: Voices of Women of Color in LeadershipB405A panel of women heads of school will share their leadership journeys in this interactive conversation ... Workshop Session CLeadership and Management for Equity and InclusionA panel of women heads of school will share their leadership journeys in this interactive conversation about their pathways, their lived experiences, and purposeful steps to consider when pursuing leadership opportunities. The moderator is Sylvia Rodriguez Vargas, who will use her doctoral work as a framework for discussion. The panelists will share how their formative experiences inform their approaches to leadership within a framework that is culturally relevant. Cultural intelligence,cultural competency, and cross-cultural networking shape the ways in which many of these women navigate and exercise leadership. You’ll find that a central part of culturally relevant leadership involves practices that are centered on fluid, equitable relationships that encourage collaborative, reflective decision making and are sensitive to skills and behaviors appropriate in intercultural situations.Ayanna Hill-Gill, Atlanta Girls' School (GA); Joan Hill, The Lamplighter School (TX); Suzanna Jemsby, The Galloway School (GA); Marcia Prewitt Spiller, Woodward Academy (GA)Facilitator: Sylvia Rodriguez Vargas, Atlanta Girls' School (GA)
    Who We Are: Racial and Ethnic Identity Development for Educators and Youth Part 2B409In the first part of this workshop on how we learn about, internalize, and grow to love or hate group ... Workshop Session BRacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, ApproachesIn the first part of this workshop on how we learn about, internalize, and grow to love or hate group identity, we focus on our own identifies and experiences. In this second part, we build upon that knowledge to focus on others and how we show up in relation to others, particularly students.Rosetta Lee, Seattle Girls' School (WA)
    Who We Are: Racial and Ethnic Identity Development for Educators and Youth Part 1B409 How do we learn about our various group identities, such as African American, Asian, Native American, ... Workshop Session ARacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches How do we learn about our various group identities, such as African American, Asian, Native American, Latino, and white? What messages have we internalized? Why do some of us love our identities while others have own-group shame and hatred? Learn how to co-author the identity development of youth and adults to the benefit of all. Part 1 of this two-part session will focus on our own identities and experiences. Part 2 will build upon that knowledge to focus on others and how we show up in relation to others, particularly students. Rosetta Lee, Seattle Girls' School (WA)
    Watching the Watcher: Articulating and Deconstructing the Authoritarian “White Gaze”B403 Using excerpts from ethicist Sharene Razack’s book Looking White People in the Eye while also analyzing ... Workshop Session ABuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice Using excerpts from ethicist Sharene Razack’s book Looking White People in the Eye while also analyzing contemporary cultural examples, this session provides a place to examine how the white gaze and the relentless fetishising of the darker body creates spaces ripe to replicate oppressive behaviors. Examine the ways that watching the pain of oppressed people is often misused as a teaching tool to navigate and manage varying levels of racism. You will unpack these and related issues through small and large group discussions. In addition, you’ll take away critical tools to help understand and articulate how the white gaze operates in and beyond academic spaces. Stacey Gibson, Francis W. Parker School (IL)
    Viewbook vs. Reality: Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in the Admission ProcessA314 Charged with increasing the diversity of our schools, admission professionals have the opportunity ... Workshop Session AEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices Charged with increasing the diversity of our schools, admission professionals have the opportunity to lead the way in conversations about the complexities of this goal. We will present a new model for understanding the roles of community, school, and self in creating and sustaining healthy, diverse school communities. In this interactive workshop, we’ll explore together how the admission office can partner with the school community to shape a message around diversity that balances aspirations and accuracy. We will also discuss best practices in the admission process, community demographics, obstacles, and implicit bias. Kim Scott, Georgetown Day School (DC); Lisa Shambaugh, St. Andrew's Episcopal School (MD)
    The Rooster's Egg: Beyond the Dominant Narrative and Empowering Students through CounterstoriesA302Counterstories — expressions of experience beyond the dominant narrative — can empower students, reposition ... Workshop Session ARacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, ApproachesCounterstories — expressions of experience beyond the dominant narrative — can empower students, reposition teachers, and help guide institutional change. Learn how to craft interdisciplinary and team-taught curricula by triangulating and layering counterstories, including non-canonical fiction of the African diaspora, recovered slave narratives, and empowered student voices. Join two teachers who have different racial identities but matching goals for students. They’ll lead you to explore the potential of the counterstory to shift classroom conversation beyond the expected white normative voice and toward a meaningful engagement with the voices and experiences of people of color. Through reflection and engagement with frameworks from both critical race theory and racial identity development, you will prepare strategies for shifting curricula at your home school.Kelena Reid, The Moses Brown School (RI); Nina Leacock, Bosque School (NM)
    The Case of the Carlisle Indian School's Only "Porto Rican" Graduate: Genealogy for Identity ResearchA406 It’s essential to discover, research, and preserve family stories in a timely manner before the ability ... Workshop Session ARacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches It’s essential to discover, research, and preserve family stories in a timely manner before the ability to communicate with older generations is lost. In this workshop, we will start with one such story of lost identity. Then we’ll move toward an in-class attempt at using genealogical research to rescue, document, and analyze students’ ancestry so they can better understand who they are and what forces have shaped their paths. Our goal: to share the process, trials, and triumphs of this endeavor. Angie Nevarez and Maura Large, Chadwick School (CA)
    Supporting Our Asian American and Pacific Islander Students: Critical Race Theory, Affinity Groups, and MoreA401Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) students regularly hear comments and questions that perpetuate ... Workshop Session AEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next PracticesAsian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) students regularly hear comments and questions that perpetuate the model-minority myth and the view of Asian culture as monolithic. These assumptions often reflect a lack of awareness about the history surrounding AAPI racial, ethnic, and cultural identities. How can you help AAPI students experience positive identity development and empower them to engage in our nation’s dialogue about race? Explore these challenges through critical race theory, affinity groups, curricular representation, and other techniques to create an inclusive culture where AAPI students can thrive and strive for a more equitable, just society.Ted Chen and Emily Chu, Lakeside School (WA); Howard Chang, Flint Hill School (VA)
    Supernatural Phenomena in Black Literature and Media: Zombies, Ghosts, and Spaceships to a New FutureB402 Explore ways to incorporate current popular culture trends into a secondary-level black literature ... Workshop Session ABuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice Explore ways to incorporate current popular culture trends into a secondary-level black literature or interdisciplinary course. We will discuss unit and lesson plans that expose students to Zora Neale Hurston‘s anthropological work in Haiti, the Yoruba religion, and Vodou through contemporary music and film; cultural haunting in Toni Morrison‘s Beloved; and Afrofuturism in Octavia Butler‘s Parable of the Sower. We will also discuss ways to incorporate positive racial identity activities for students of diverse cultural backgrounds. You will leave with tangible resources to use in the classroom and ideas for curriculum building. Naa-Norley Adom, Durham Academy (NC)
    Shielding My Race from the Blindness of WhitenessA405Racial microaggressions are defined by Derald Wing Sue as “the brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, ... Workshop Session ASelf-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, SpiritRacial microaggressions are defined by Derald Wing Sue as “the brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, and environmental indignities that communicate hostile or derogatory racial slights and insults to people of color.” How do people of color shield themselves from these insidious remarks and educate white people about the damage of racial microaggressions? In this session, you‘ll hear about the scholarly work of Derald Wing Sue, work in small groups, share within the larger group, and come to a better understanding of how to recuperate from racial microaggressions and how best to address them when they occur. This workshop is open to people of color in all positions as well as white allies. ​Sandra Chapman, Little Red School House and Elisabeth Irwin High School (LREI) (NY)
    Parent and Trustee Engagement on Navigating Tough Cultural Conversations and Increasing Cultural AwarenessB401 Now more than ever, schools are assessing how ready their faculty and parents are to discuss tough ... Workshop Session ABuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice Now more than ever, schools are assessing how ready their faculty and parents are to discuss tough cultural topics — especially in light of events involving bias toward Muslims and immigrants, transgender identity, and police killings of African American males. Would your alumni join in singing chants using the N-word? Do they feel confident and comfortable with their own cultural identity as they navigate and communicate with other cultural groups? How well do you prepare parents to have tough cultural conversations with their children? Hear from a parent and trustee on effective strategies to increase cultural responsiveness, ways to engage all parents, and action steps you can take at your school. Tiffany Taylor Smith, Newark Academy (NJ)
    LGBTQ People of Color: The Intersection of Race, Gender, and Sexual Orientation in Independent SchoolsB408Join a discussion led by two LGBTQ men of color about the complex intersection of identities. LGBTQ ... Workshop Session ARacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, ApproachesJoin a discussion led by two LGBTQ men of color about the complex intersection of identities. LGBTQ teachers of color at independent schools have noted that their dual status provides various lenses through which to address stereotypes and raise awareness across areas of oppression. People of color find that they can invoke their sexual orientation as a shared identity with the white LGBTQ community, but the impact of race on sexual orientation often leads to a heightened sense of awareness about marginalized groups and issues of inclusion. For most of the people of color who identify as LGBTQ, race is viewed as an additional identity to incorporate into an overall identity as a teacher.Philip McAdoo, Sidwell Friends School (DC); Quinton Walker, University School of Nashville (TN)
    In Formation: Supporting Adolescent Identity Development for Students of Color at Independent SchoolsA305As part of the quest to create a diverse student population, talented minorities are given outstanding ... Workshop Session ASelf-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, SpiritAs part of the quest to create a diverse student population, talented minorities are given outstanding opportunities to accelerate their life trajectories. But what happens once they are plucked from the environment in which their skills flourished and placed in an entirely new space? This panel reflects on the challenges that students of color at independent schools may face during their stages of identity development and formation. Presenters will examine the impact of catering — and not catering — to the niche talents of minority populations, compounded by the need to adapt to the racial dynamics associated with attending secondary schools. You’ll learn strategies for empowering students of color to develop a healthy sense of self as they prepare for success within and beyond the independent school experience.Anahita Homayoun, Green Ivy Education Consulting; Lauren Linder, Alumna, The Weather Channel; Kwad Acheampong, Prudential
    How Do We Break Down Racial Barriers in Independent School Communities?A407 Discover ways to change your school’s culture so it can be more inclusive of people of color. During ... Workshop Session AOrganizational Development and Institutional Change Discover ways to change your school’s culture so it can be more inclusive of people of color. During this workshop, you will learn about implementing new student organizations and look at ways to increase recruitment and retention of both employees and students of color. Come ready to brainstorm and discuss academic program offerings that could help increase interest in your school among people of color. Laura Desai, The Lewis School of Princeton (NJ)
    Hidden Among Privilege: The Experience of Low SES Students in Our SchoolsA402This workshop will share the results of an action research project that examined the ways socioeconomic ... Workshop Session AEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next PracticesThis workshop will share the results of an action research project that examined the ways socioeconomic status (SES) can exclude students from a school’s community and culture. Teachers and students collected data and developed recommendations to increase a sense of belonging for lower SES students. The resulting initiatives included an affinity group for lower SES students and a short film about the daily socioeconomic microaggressions that exclude non-wealthy students in subtle but profound ways. You’ll hear about some of the latest research, vocabulary, and best practices in addressing SES in independent schools.Natalie Johnson, Lauren White, and Patrick Wallace, Chadwick School (CA)
    Friend-raising: Empowering Parents of Color in Your School’s Fundraising CultureA408 Families of color in independent schools often experience the fundraising culture and financial aid ... Workshop Session AOrganizational Development and Institutional Change Families of color in independent schools often experience the fundraising culture and financial aid process through the lens of stereotype threat. Some parents of color will broadly demonstrate high socioeconomic status in an effort to dispel stereotypes — which can deeply complicate the experiences of families of color engaged with financial support. Come to this workshop to learn the joint perspectives of a director of annual giving and a director of diversity. They will share best practices in school transparency and ways to respond to the unique needs of families of color when you’re addressing who gives money, who receives money, and how those transactions take place. Erica Corbin and Courtney Archer-Buckmire, The Chapin School (NY)
    Experiences of Faculty of Color in Boarding SchoolsA312 Curious about boarding schools — either because you have worked at one or you’re thinking about it? ... Workshop Session ABuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice Curious about boarding schools — either because you have worked at one or you’re thinking about it? A panel of seasoned educators will share their experiences in various roles at boarding schools and explore the related benefits and challenges. They will also offer advice to colleagues considering a boarding school career. Celeste Payne, Westtown School (PA); Lisa McGrath, Westminster School (CT); Donnie Smith, The Knox School (NY); Edna-Anne Valdepenas, George School (PA)
    Diversity Leadership in NAIS Independent Schools: Model for Shifting From Diversity Toward Excellence Through EquityA313 This workshop will unpack a recent study of NAIS diversity leaders in the context of co-ed independent ... Workshop Session AEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices This workshop will unpack a recent study of NAIS diversity leaders in the context of co-ed independent schools and the resulting theoretical model that explains what contributes to effective diversity leadership. The study was guided by a central research question: How does school leadership ensure educational equity for students from diverse class, racial, and ethnic backgrounds? This question concentrated the study on the work of diversity directors and other leaders; the role and efforts of school heads; students of color; and the practices that contribute to educational equity. Charesse Ford, The Agnes Irwin School (PA)
    Diversity Initiatives and Global Studies: Partners in Promoting InclusionA303 Because they share a common goal to increase skill sets and student outcomes, diversity programs ... Workshop Session ABuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice Because they share a common goal to increase skill sets and student outcomes, diversity programs and global studies curricula can work in tandem to create a culturally competent environment at your school. Attend this workshop to discuss independent schools’ investment in, views of, and understanding of global studies and diversity. Our goal is to help you understand how an equitable partnership between the two areas can ensure cultural, academic, and community competency. John Creeden, School Year Abroad (MA); Nicole DuFauchard, The Advent School (MA)
    Culturally Responsive PedagogyA404 This highly interactive workshop will examine teaching and learning strategies, concepts, and theories ... Workshop Session ABuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice This highly interactive workshop will examine teaching and learning strategies, concepts, and theories embedded in student-centered learning appropriate for diverse student populations in K – 12 and college classrooms. The emphasis is on instructional rigor and relevance as they relate to culturally responsive pedagogy within the confines of diversity variables such as ability differences, age, gender, race, and ethnicity. You will explore how to actively engage all students in your classes and increase student achievement by identifying, nurturing, and utilizing the strengths students bring to school. You’ll also learn how to create a culturally responsive, well-managed classroom environment that contributes to exploration, discovery, higher order thinking, and depth of knowledge. Lana DuBose, Ravenscroft School (NC)
    Creating Mentoring Programs for Black Girls' SuccessA403 In this session, you will be given strategies to successfully implement a mentoring program for black ... Workshop Session ARacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches In this session, you will be given strategies to successfully implement a mentoring program for black girls in independent schools. Find out how mentoring programs at your school can help girls to thrive socially, emotionally, and academically. Kisha Webster, K.L. Webster and Associates
    Blogging Beyond the Classroom: Online Engagement for Professional and Personal GrowthA410 This panel discussion features three independent school educators of color who actively blog — not ... Workshop Session ABuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice This panel discussion features three independent school educators of color who actively blog — not only on educational practice but also on political developments, social justice, and cultural trends. Through their engagement in social media, they have built both audiences and networks that have contributed significantly to their professional and personal development. Listen as they describe their respective journeys to edu-blogging and weigh in on the benefits and risks so far, both online and within their institutions. Then consider your own online engagements and reflect on how these satisfy your desire for professional growth and personal agency. Sherri Spelic, American International School Vienna (AUSTRIA); Christopher Rogers, Greene Street Friends School (PA); Marcy Webb, Watkinson School (CT)
    Baggage CheckA409 Women of color are invited to share personal experiences in this workshop, where the main objective ... Workshop Session ASelf-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit Women of color are invited to share personal experiences in this workshop, where the main objective is to check our proverbial baggage — an encounter with racism, the perception of a gender-based glass ceiling, or something else. Collectively, we’ll analyze each item and discuss its purpose in both our personal and professional lives. Shall we place these experiences back in our bag and carry them with us to work each day, or leave them at home, or put them on the shelf? Suzanna Jemsby and Cutia Blunt, The Galloway School (GA)
    AIM to Create Change: Using AIM and Other NAIS Resources to Create Institutional ChangeB308 Graland Country Day School has taken NAIS’s Assessment of Inclusivity and Multiculturalism (AIM) ... Workshop Session AOrganizational Development and Institutional Change Graland Country Day School has taken NAIS’s Assessment of Inclusivity and Multiculturalism (AIM) twice in an effort to create systemic change in its community. In this workshop, you will hear how the data and information the school gained from the AIM process helped bring about changes and influenced its strategic plan for the next five years. You’ll also learn how the professional development NAIS provided helped Graland administrators feel confident about taking their next steps toward organizational and developmental change. This workshop is designed for diversity practitioners, senior administrators, heads of school, and other school leaders. James Foreman, Graland Country Day School (CO)
    “We Want to Hire Leaders of Color—There Just Aren’t Any Candidates!” (Actually, There Are) PART TwoB405Part two of this workshop will continue the conversation about hiring leaders of color in independent ... Workshop Session BLeadership and Management for Equity and InclusionPart two of this workshop will continue the conversation about hiring leaders of color in independent schools. Alison Park, Blink Consulting; Steve Morris and Percy Abram, The Bush School
    “We Want to Hire Leaders of Color — There Just Aren’t Any Candidates!” (Actually, There Are) Part 1B405This workshop starts with a question: Why are leaders of color vital to our schools? Once we have a ... Workshop Session ALeadership and Management for Equity and InclusionThis workshop starts with a question: Why are leaders of color vital to our schools? Once we have a shared understanding of why, we will explore what responsibilities and opportunities exist to cultivate leaders of color. We will also identify effective practices to create community and institutional structures where leaders of color thrive. The presenters will share their own experiences, including their co-facilitation of professional learning communities for leaders of color. You can then reflect on your experiences, learn from colleagues, and draw on current research. You’ll identify systemic frameworks and implementable actions for cultivating, not just caring about, leadership of color in your school.Alison Park, Blink Consulting; Steve Morris and Percy Abram, The Bush School
    (In)Visibility of Asian American and Asian Pacific Islander Students in Independent Schools: A Self-Study at San Francisco University High SchoolA304 The race dialogue continues to be a black/white conversation in Hollywood, the media, politics, and ... Workshop Session ABuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice The race dialogue continues to be a black/white conversation in Hollywood, the media, politics, and even in our schools. This can often alienate other racial groups, including the Asian American/Asian Pacific Islander (API) community, thus creating divisions rather than solidarity. We will use both qualitative and quantitative data from San Francisco University High School to examine why APIs continue to be invisible in our communities. Then we’ll explore  how we educators can create visibility and opportunities to empower our API students around these issues. Rochelle Reodica, Joanna Ro, and Stan Lau, San Francisco University High School (CA)
    “Ouch!” Lessons to Teach Elementary Students About Microaggressions and Managing Moments That HurtA311Microaggressions, the everyday offenses marginalized people experience, affect us all. Children are ... Workshop Session ABuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social JusticeMicroaggressions, the everyday offenses marginalized people experience, affect us all. Children are not immune to the American experience, in which middle class white standards are presented as the norm. They may act on assumptions that hurt people who do not look, sound, dress, or speak the same way. As educators, we should address this problem and improve the way people engage with one another. At this workshop, you will learn one approach to teaching students about how to prevent microaggressions and how to respond when they do occur. Presenters will share lesson content as well as background information to build community and students’ understanding of the impact of their words.Meryl Heyliger, Kay Miller, and Angela Sandford, Georgetown Day School
    Murphy‘s Law: The Realities of Your First Year in School LeadershipA316Many educators who aspire to leadership roles believe their teaching experience is preparation enough. ... Workshop Session ALeadership and Management for Equity and InclusionMany educators who aspire to leadership roles believe their teaching experience is preparation enough. But on top of the multifaceted educational responsibilities that come with leadership,  unexpected situations with students, faculty, and governance bodies are inescapable. Increased accountability to parents has also magnified the need for a broader skill set. This session will investigate the cultural dynamics that affect leaders of color; guide you through a personal skills inventory and case study debriefs; and let you role-play scenarios to analyze the process of managing the challenging situations newly appointed school leaders face.Sean Hamer and Byron Davis, Germantown Friends School (PA)
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