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Workshop Session A (Thursday, December 8 10:15-11:30 AM)

  • Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
    • (In)Visibility of Asian American and Asian Pacific Islander Students in Independent Schools: A Self-Study at San Francisco University High School


      A304

      The race dialogue continues to be a black/white conversation in Hollywood, the media, politics, and even in our schools. This can often alienate other racial groups, including the Asian American/Asian Pacific Islander (API) community, thus creating divisions rather than solidarity. We will use both qualitative and quantitative data from San Francisco University High School to examine why APIs continue to be invisible in our communities. Then we’ll explore  how we educators can create visibility and opportunities to empower our API students around these issues.
      Presented By Rochelle Reodica, Joanna Ro, and Stan Lau, San Francisco University High School (CA)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • “Ouch!” Lessons to Teach Elementary Students About Microaggressions and Managing Moments That Hurt


      A311

      Microaggressions, the everyday offenses marginalized people experience, affect us all. Children are not immune to the American experience, in which middle class white standards are presented as the norm. They may act on assumptions that hurt people who do not look, sound, dress, or speak the same way. As educators, we should address this problem and improve the way people engage with one another. At this workshop, you will learn one approach to teaching students about how to prevent microaggressions and how to respond when they do occur. Presenters will share lesson content as well as background information to build community and students’ understanding of the impact of their words.
      Presented ByMeryl Heyliger, Kay Miller, and Angela Sandford, Georgetown Day School
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • Blogging Beyond the Classroom: Online Engagement for Professional and Personal Growth


      A410

      This panel discussion features three independent school educators of color who actively blog — not only on educational practice but also on political developments, social justice, and cultural trends. Through their engagement in social media, they have built both audiences and networks that have contributed significantly to their professional and personal development. Listen as they describe their respective journeys to edu-blogging and weigh in on the benefits and risks so far, both online and within their institutions. Then consider your own online engagements and reflect on how these satisfy your desire for professional growth and personal agency.
      Presented By Sherri Spelic, American International School Vienna (AUSTRIA); Christopher Rogers, Greene Street Friends School (PA); Marcy Webb, Watkinson School (CT)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • Culturally Responsive Pedagogy


      A404

      This highly interactive workshop will examine teaching and learning strategies, concepts, and theories embedded in student-centered learning appropriate for diverse student populations in K – 12 and college classrooms. The emphasis is on instructional rigor and relevance as they relate to culturally responsive pedagogy within the confines of diversity variables such as ability differences, age, gender, race, and ethnicity. You will explore how to actively engage all students in your classes and increase student achievement by identifying, nurturing, and utilizing the strengths students bring to school. You’ll also learn how to create a culturally responsive, well-managed classroom environment that contributes to exploration, discovery, higher order thinking, and depth of knowledge.
      Presented By Lana DuBose, Ravenscroft School (NC)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • Diversity Initiatives and Global Studies: Partners in Promoting Inclusion


      A303

      Because they share a common goal to increase skill sets and student outcomes, diversity programs and global studies curricula can work in tandem to create a culturally competent environment at your school. Attend this workshop to discuss independent schools’ investment in, views of, and understanding of global studies and diversity. Our goal is to help you understand how an equitable partnership between the two areas can ensure cultural, academic, and community competency.
      Presented By John Creeden, School Year Abroad (MA); Nicole DuFauchard, The Advent School (MA)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • Experiences of Faculty of Color in Boarding Schools


      A312

      Curious about boarding schools — either because you have worked at one or you’re thinking about it? A panel of seasoned educators will share their experiences in various roles at boarding schools and explore the related benefits and challenges. They will also offer advice to colleagues considering a boarding school career.
      Presented By Celeste Payne, Westtown School (PA); Lisa McGrath, Westminster School (CT); Donnie Smith, The Knox School (NY); Edna-Anne Valdepenas, George School (PA)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • Parent and Trustee Engagement on Navigating Tough Cultural Conversations and Increasing Cultural Awareness


      B401

      Now more than ever, schools are assessing how ready their faculty and parents are to discuss tough cultural topics — especially in light of events involving bias toward Muslims and immigrants, transgender identity, and police killings of African American males. Would your alumni join in singing chants using the N-word? Do they feel confident and comfortable with their own cultural identity as they navigate and communicate with other cultural groups? How well do you prepare parents to have tough cultural conversations with their children? Hear from a parent and trustee on effective strategies to increase cultural responsiveness, ways to engage all parents, and action steps you can take at your school.
      Presented By Tiffany Taylor Smith, Newark Academy (NJ)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • Speaking From a Place of Strength: Black Lives Matter Dialogue from Personal Understanding to Community Implementation


      A301

      With our world being torn apart, our psyches damaged and in the resurgent wake of extrajudicial executions of black and brown folk nationally, we need solutions all educators can pursue to make change in a violent world. Workshop participants will process and explore their personal understandings of Bryan Stevenson’s work within the context of the Black Lives Matter movement, using a framework of the interpersonal, societal, and historical levers that will help us to restore justice to all humans in our country. Materials from Bryan Stevenson’s Equal Justice Initiative will serve as a catalyst for this process and an example of how to promote dialogue and implement programs that will educate adults and children on how to make black lives actually matter. Finally, participants will have an opportunity to develop a plan beginning this crucial work in their schools and communities.
      Presented By​Carol A. Swainson, Bentley School; Orpheus Crutchfield, StratéGenius
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • Supernatural Phenomena in Black Literature and Media: Zombies, Ghosts, and Spaceships to a New Future


      B402

      Explore ways to incorporate current popular culture trends into a secondary-level black literature or interdisciplinary course. We will discuss unit and lesson plans that expose students to Zora Neale Hurston‘s anthropological work in Haiti, the Yoruba religion, and Vodou through contemporary music and film; cultural haunting in Toni Morrison‘s Beloved; and Afrofuturism in Octavia Butler‘s Parable of the Sower. We will also discuss ways to incorporate positive racial identity activities for students of diverse cultural backgrounds. You will leave with tangible resources to use in the classroom and ideas for curriculum building.
      Presented By Naa-Norley Adom, Durham Academy (NC)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • Watching the Watcher: Articulating and Deconstructing the Authoritarian “White Gaze”


      B403

      Using excerpts from ethicist Sharene Razack’s book Looking White People in the Eye while also analyzing contemporary cultural examples, this session provides a place to examine how the white gaze and the relentless fetishising of the darker body creates spaces ripe to replicate oppressive behaviors. Examine the ways that watching the pain of oppressed people is often misused as a teaching tool to navigate and manage varying levels of racism. You will unpack these and related issues through small and large group discussions. In addition, you’ll take away critical tools to help understand and articulate how the white gaze operates in and beyond academic spaces.
      Presented ByStacey Gibson, Francis W. Parker School (IL)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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  • Equity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
    • Diversity Leadership in NAIS Independent Schools: Model for Shifting From Diversity Toward Excellence Through Equity


      A313

      This workshop will unpack a recent study of NAIS diversity leaders in the context of co-ed independent schools and the resulting theoretical model that explains what contributes to effective diversity leadership. The study was guided by a central research question: How does school leadership ensure educational equity for students from diverse class, racial, and ethnic backgrounds? This question concentrated the study on the work of diversity directors and other leaders; the role and efforts of school heads; students of color; and the practices that contribute to educational equity.
      Presented By Charesse Ford, The Agnes Irwin School (PA)
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      TrackEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
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    • Hidden Among Privilege: The Experience of Low SES Students in Our Schools


      A402

      This workshop will share the results of an action research project that examined the ways socioeconomic status (SES) can exclude students from a school’s community and culture. Teachers and students collected data and developed recommendations to increase a sense of belonging for lower SES students. The resulting initiatives included an affinity group for lower SES students and a short film about the daily socioeconomic microaggressions that exclude non-wealthy students in subtle but profound ways. You’ll hear about some of the latest research, vocabulary, and best practices in addressing SES in independent schools.
      Presented ByNatalie Johnson, Lauren White, and Patrick Wallace, Chadwick School (CA)
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      TrackEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
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    • Supporting Our Asian American and Pacific Islander Students: Critical Race Theory, Affinity Groups, and More


      A401

      Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) students regularly hear comments and questions that perpetuate the model-minority myth and the view of Asian culture as monolithic. These assumptions often reflect a lack of awareness about the history surrounding AAPI racial, ethnic, and cultural identities. How can you help AAPI students experience positive identity development and empower them to engage in our nation’s dialogue about race? Explore these challenges through critical race theory, affinity groups, curricular representation, and other techniques to create an inclusive culture where AAPI students can thrive and strive for a more equitable, just society.
      Presented ByTed Chen and Emily Chu, Lakeside School (WA); Howard Chang, Flint Hill School (VA)
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      TrackEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
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    • Viewbook vs. Reality: Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in the Admission Process


      A314

      Charged with increasing the diversity of our schools, admission professionals have the opportunity to lead the way in conversations about the complexities of this goal. We will present a new model for understanding the roles of community, school, and self in creating and sustaining healthy, diverse school communities. In this interactive workshop, we’ll explore together how the admission office can partner with the school community to shape a message around diversity that balances aspirations and accuracy. We will also discuss best practices in the admission process, community demographics, obstacles, and implicit bias.
      Presented By Kim Scott, Georgetown Day School (DC); Lisa Shambaugh, St. Andrew's Episcopal School (MD)
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      TrackEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
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  • Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
    • “We Want to Hire Leaders of Color — There Just Aren’t Any Candidates!” (Actually, There Are) Part 1


      B405

      This workshop starts with a question: Why are leaders of color vital to our schools? Once we have a shared understanding of why, we will explore what responsibilities and opportunities exist to cultivate leaders of color. We will also identify effective practices to create community and institutional structures where leaders of color thrive. The presenters will share their own experiences, including their co-facilitation of professional learning communities for leaders of color. You can then reflect on your experiences, learn from colleagues, and draw on current research. You’ll identify systemic frameworks and implementable actions for cultivating, not just caring about, leadership of color in your school.
      Presented ByAlison Park, Blink Consulting; Steve Morris and Percy Abram, The Bush School
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      TrackLeadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
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    • Murphy‘s Law: The Realities of Your First Year in School Leadership


      A316

      Many educators who aspire to leadership roles believe their teaching experience is preparation enough. But on top of the multifaceted educational responsibilities that come with leadership,  unexpected situations with students, faculty, and governance bodies are inescapable. Increased accountability to parents has also magnified the need for a broader skill set. This session will investigate the cultural dynamics that affect leaders of color; guide you through a personal skills inventory and case study debriefs; and let you role-play scenarios to analyze the process of managing the challenging situations newly appointed school leaders face.
      Presented BySean Hamer and Byron Davis, Germantown Friends School (PA)
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      TrackLeadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
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  • Organizational Development and Institutional Change
    • AIM to Create Change: Using AIM and Other NAIS Resources to Create Institutional Change


      B308

      Graland Country Day School has taken NAIS’s Assessment of Inclusivity and Multiculturalism (AIM) twice in an effort to create systemic change in its community. In this workshop, you will hear how the data and information the school gained from the AIM process helped bring about changes and influenced its strategic plan for the next five years. You’ll also learn how the professional development NAIS provided helped Graland administrators feel confident about taking their next steps toward organizational and developmental change. This workshop is designed for diversity practitioners, senior administrators, heads of school, and other school leaders.
      Presented By James Foreman, Graland Country Day School (CO)
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      TrackOrganizational Development and Institutional Change
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    • Friend-raising: Empowering Parents of Color in Your School’s Fundraising Culture


      A408

      Families of color in independent schools often experience the fundraising culture and financial aid process through the lens of stereotype threat. Some parents of color will broadly demonstrate high socioeconomic status in an effort to dispel stereotypes — which can deeply complicate the experiences of families of color engaged with financial support. Come to this workshop to learn the joint perspectives of a director of annual giving and a director of diversity. They will share best practices in school transparency and ways to respond to the unique needs of families of color when you’re addressing who gives money, who receives money, and how those transactions take place.
      Presented ByErica Corbin and Courtney Archer-Buckmire, The Chapin School (NY)
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      TrackOrganizational Development and Institutional Change
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    • How Do We Break Down Racial Barriers in Independent School Communities?


      A407

      Discover ways to change your school’s culture so it can be more inclusive of people of color. During this workshop, you will learn about implementing new student organizations and look at ways to increase recruitment and retention of both employees and students of color. Come ready to brainstorm and discuss academic program offerings that could help increase interest in your school among people of color.
      Presented By Laura Desai, The Lewis School of Princeton (NJ)
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      TrackOrganizational Development and Institutional Change
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  • Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
    • Creating Mentoring Programs for Black Girls' Success


      A403

      In this session, you will be given strategies to successfully implement a mentoring program for black girls in independent schools. Find out how mentoring programs at your school can help girls to thrive socially, emotionally, and academically.
      Presented By Kisha Webster, K.L. Webster and Associates
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      TrackRacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
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    • LGBTQ People of Color: The Intersection of Race, Gender, and Sexual Orientation in Independent Schools


      B408

      Join a discussion led by two LGBTQ men of color about the complex intersection of identities. LGBTQ teachers of color at independent schools have noted that their dual status provides various lenses through which to address stereotypes and raise awareness across areas of oppression. People of color find that they can invoke their sexual orientation as a shared identity with the white LGBTQ community, but the impact of race on sexual orientation often leads to a heightened sense of awareness about marginalized groups and issues of inclusion. For most of the people of color who identify as LGBTQ, race is viewed as an additional identity to incorporate into an overall identity as a teacher.
      Presented ByPhilip McAdoo, Sidwell Friends School (DC); Quinton Walker, University School of Nashville (TN)
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      TrackRacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
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    • The Case of the Carlisle Indian School's Only "Porto Rican" Graduate: Genealogy for Identity Research


      A406

      It’s essential to discover, research, and preserve family stories in a timely manner before the ability to communicate with older generations is lost. In this workshop, we will start with one such story of lost identity. Then we’ll move toward an in-class attempt at using genealogical research to rescue, document, and analyze students’ ancestry so they can better understand who they are and what forces have shaped their paths. Our goal: to share the process, trials, and triumphs of this endeavor.
      Presented ByAngie Nevarez and Maura Large, Chadwick School (CA)
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      TrackRacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
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    • The Rooster's Egg: Beyond the Dominant Narrative and Empowering Students through Counterstories


      A302

      Counterstories — expressions of experience beyond the dominant narrative — can empower students, reposition teachers, and help guide institutional change. Learn how to craft interdisciplinary and team-taught curricula by triangulating and layering counterstories, including non-canonical fiction of the African diaspora, recovered slave narratives, and empowered student voices. Join two teachers who have different racial identities but matching goals for students. They’ll lead you to explore the potential of the counterstory to shift classroom conversation beyond the expected white normative voice and toward a meaningful engagement with the voices and experiences of people of color. Through reflection and engagement with frameworks from both critical race theory and racial identity development, you will prepare strategies for shifting curricula at your home school.
      Presented ByKelena Reid, The Moses Brown School (RI); Nina Leacock, Bosque School (NM)
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      TrackRacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
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    • Who We Are: Racial and Ethnic Identity Development for Educators and Youth Part 1


      B409

      How do we learn about our various group identities, such as African American, Asian, Native American, Latino, and white? What messages have we internalized? Why do some of us love our identities while others have own-group shame and hatred? Learn how to co-author the identity development of youth and adults to the benefit of all. Part 1 of this two-part session will focus on our own identities and experiences. Part 2 will build upon that knowledge to focus on others and how we show up in relation to others, particularly students.
      Presented By Rosetta Lee, Seattle Girls' School (WA)
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      TrackRacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
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  • Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
    • Baggage Check


      A409

      Women of color are invited to share personal experiences in this workshop, where the main objective is to check our proverbial baggage — an encounter with racism, the perception of a gender-based glass ceiling, or something else. Collectively, we’ll analyze each item and discuss its purpose in both our personal and professional lives. Shall we place these experiences back in our bag and carry them with us to work each day, or leave them at home, or put them on the shelf?
      Presented By Suzanna Jemsby and Cutia Blunt, The Galloway School (GA)
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      TrackSelf-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
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    • In Formation: Supporting Adolescent Identity Development for Students of Color at Independent Schools


      A305

      As part of the quest to create a diverse student population, talented minorities are given outstanding opportunities to accelerate their life trajectories. But what happens once they are plucked from the environment in which their skills flourished and placed in an entirely new space? This panel reflects on the challenges that students of color at independent schools may face during their stages of identity development and formation. Presenters will examine the impact of catering — and not catering — to the niche talents of minority populations, compounded by the need to adapt to the racial dynamics associated with attending secondary schools. You’ll learn strategies for empowering students of color to develop a healthy sense of self as they prepare for success within and beyond the independent school experience.
      Presented ByAnahita Homayoun, Green Ivy Education Consulting; Lauren Linder, Alumna, The Weather Channel; Kwad Acheampong, Prudential
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      TrackSelf-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
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    • Shielding My Race from the Blindness of Whiteness


      A405

      Racial microaggressions are defined by Derald Wing Sue as “the brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, and environmental indignities that communicate hostile or derogatory racial slights and insults to people of color.” How do people of color shield themselves from these insidious remarks and educate white people about the damage of racial microaggressions? In this session, you‘ll hear about the scholarly work of Derald Wing Sue, work in small groups, share within the larger group, and come to a better understanding of how to recuperate from racial microaggressions and how best to address them when they occur. This workshop is open to people of color in all positions as well as white allies. ​
      Presented BySandra Chapman, Little Red School House and Elisabeth Irwin High School (LREI) (NY)
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      TrackSelf-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
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