• Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
    • Building the Beloved Community Through Social Action


      B308

      What does it take to work toward realizing Martin Luther King’s dream of the beloved community? Adaptive self-empowerment, appreciation of community cultural wealth, and an understanding of solidarity. In this workshop, discover models for applying critical race theory and best practices in community engagement to empower students to see themselves as change agents for justice. You will learn how to shape assignments that encourage students to engage with the world beyond the classroom, including partnering with nonprofit organizations. You‘ll also get tips on how to collaborate on schoolwide endeavors — such as engaging diversity days and student-led community discussions on social justice topics — to build the beloved community.
      Presented By Lauren Brownlee, Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart (MD); Shields Sundberg, Sidwell Friends School (DC)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • Deep Diversity: Using Brain Science to Overcome Us vs. Them


      A409

      What if your interactions with people whose races differ from yours are influenced by things happening below the radar of awareness, hidden even from yourself? Research demonstrates that — in spite of good intentions and fair-mindedness — our unconscious mind and automatic brain processes frequently favor those most “like us.” This creates racial blind spots and hard-to-see discrimination that is systemic, and it results in a society in which many hard-working people are unable to get ahead. Through this award-winning presentation, you will explore how influential the unconscious mind is in human interactions, the prejudice habits we’ve learned regarding racial differences, and the negative impact of racial blind spots in schools and the workplace. Using an interactive storytelling approach, you will explore the impact of racism and Islamophobia as well as the strategies that can reduce such biases.
      Presented By Shakil Choudhury, Anima Leadership
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • How to Explain White Privilege to Skeptics in One Hour


      A314

      Using a series of pointed questions, we will work together to create a graphic map of social groups based on locations and roles in U.S. history and society. You and your fellow participants will think together about which groups have not had access to rights, resources, and respect — ultimately revealing the social positioning and impact of white privilege and dispelling illusions of a level playing field. Once the graphic has been created, you will explore social dynamics, dominant cultural attitudes, and behaviors that perpetuate power and privilege patterns, even when best intentions are in play.
      Presented By Debby Irving, Debby Irving Racial Justice Education & Consulting
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • Is It Getting Better? Exploring #BlackLivesMatter and the Civil Rights Movement with Middle Schoolers (5th-8th)


      A302

      Too often, anti-bias education is limited to increasing students’ self-awareness and identity development. It is critical for students to understand the powerful impact of unchecked unconscious bias that results in violence and injustice. In this interactive workshop, middle school teachers will gain skills, language, and tools to design lessons and facilitate discussions that help students make connections between their own self-awareness and bias, the need for racial justice movements, and social activism. As a participant, you will act as both learner and teacher by engaging in small-group discussions and brainstorming how to adapt these materials and lessons to make them developmentally appropriate for grades 5 to 8.
      Presented By Rebecca Yacono and Mellisha Culpepper, Shady Hill School (MA)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • Rebranding Diversity Day: Engaging Students, Faculty, and the Community in the 21st Century


      A406

      Does your school set aside a day for students and faculty to deepen understanding of themselves and others through the lens of diversity and inclusion? Is it meaningful? Is it worth having? In this workshop, speakers from Colorado Academy will tell how a rebranding strategy won the support of administration, faculty, and students and transformed Diversity Day perceptions, engagement, and buy-in. The new initiative is PlatFORUM, a full-day conference that encourages and models brave conversation around identity and social justice. You‘ll walk away with relevant, realistic, and manageable strategies that can make celebrating and critiquing humanity a powerful, meaningful, and necessary experience.
      Presented By Adrian Green and Michael Davis, Colorado Academy (CO)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • Rethinking How We Teach the Civil Rights Movement in History and Literature


      A408

      The civil rights movement is frequently presented in classes as a triumphant series of marches and peaceful protests that turned the tide against racial segregation and discrimination in the South. However, recent scholarship offers us a number of ways to open up that interpretation. Teachers can include a longer span of black activism, a wider array of rights movements, and the need for continued action today. This workshop will make a case for reframing the civil rights movement and provide tools to go beyond the standard textbook narrative and deepen students’ understanding of these struggles.
      Presented By Candace Chen, Benjamin Cullen, and Jason Chang, Bentley School (Lafayette Campus) (CA)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • Speak Up, Not Over: Helping White Allies Move Beyond White Fragility to Real Solidarity


      A402

      Explore how white allies can more thoughtfully engage in anti-racist work in post-Ferguson America. In this workshop, we will discuss how white educators’ tendencies to dominate conversations, monopolize emotional energy, and assume a “savior” stance can undermine effective allyship in our schools. Informed by current research and interviews, this session provides a framework for change and empowerment. The framework encourages white allies to break down barriers, build relationships, and create institutional climates that seek an end to racism in our schools and in ourselves.
      Presented By Candice Powell, Newark Academy (NJ)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • Using Activist Assessment to Engage Students as Responsive Agents, Architects, and Partners in Their Learning Journey


      B401

      ​Assessment practices are most effective when they help students become engaged self-assessors, capable of monitoring and regulating what and how they learn given specified expectations. This workshop introduces a holistic “self-in-context” assessment resource that helps learners — students and educators alike — develop the skills and perspectives to proactively engage in critical self-analyses, reflection, and reflexive praxis.  You will explore who you’re perceived to be as an educator in relation to your students and your curricular/co-curricular content. You will also examine how you can better assist your students and yourself employ internal and external feedback to make real-time adjustments in what you do (or don’t do) to improve teaching and learning. This session is geared to upper school teachers, curriculum specialists, academic deans, and other administrators.
      Presented By​Hazel Symonette, University of Wisconsin-Madison
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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  • Equity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
    • ¡No Más!: Integrating Topics of Social Justice into the High School Spanish Classroom


      B403

      Attend this workshop to learn specific strategies to incorporate topics of social justice in your Spanish classes. We will discuss Afro-Latin identity, Argentina’s Dirty War, Pinochet’s dictatorship, Bolivia’s Water War, and immigration routes to the north. The two presenters will share tried-and-true techniques to enhance students’ understanding of past and current world events in the context of their language class.
      Presented By Elena Tello and Ciara McGrath, University Preparatory Academy (WA)
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      TrackEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
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    • Changing the Race Dance Part One


      B404

      This workshop offers creative conversations that shift personal and group racism. By incorporating our human birthright practices of movement, voice, story sharing, and stillness, this workshop introduces an embodied education model called InterPlay that helps you both dignify and address the way racism injures and separates bodies. As we discover ways to breathe, shake out, move, sing, and share stories to liberate and transform the struggle, we find our way back to the wisdom of the body in the whole group, in smaller groupings, and in pairs. After playing, we’ll take time to notice and unpack what our bodies know and don’t know about racism.
      Presented ByCynthia Winton-Henry and Soyinka Rahim, InterPlay
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      TrackEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
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    • Changing the Race Dance Part Two


      B404

      In the second part of this workshop, we’ll continue to have creative conversations that shift personal and group racism. As in Part 1, we’ll incorporate movement, voice, story sharing, and stillness as we use an embodied education model called InterPlay to help ourselves both dignify and address the way racism injures and separates bodies.
      Presented ByCynthia Winton-Henry and Soyinka Rahim, InterPlay
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      TrackEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
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    • Creating Beloved Communities: The Mission of Justice in Faith-Based Schools


      A315

      As seen through his mission to realize the beloved community, Martin Luther King Jr.‘s particular religious identity demanded the pursuit of universal justice. What would it look like for faith-based schools to follow his lead? By examining case studies involving a humanities teacher, a chorus director, an admission head, and a chaplain, this session will discuss pedagogic and administrative strategies that help bring the work of justice and diversity into the foreground as a necessary expression of religious identity. Come participate in one of the small groups during this interactive workshop and exchange ideas on how your school can center its curriculum, chaplaincy, admission program, or administration around a faithful mission of justice.
      Presented By Timothy Seamans, Beth-Sarah Wright, Keith White, and Joel Thompson, Holy Innocents' Episcopal School (GA)
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      TrackEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
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    • Refugee and Immigration Stories: Strengthening Inclusive Community and Identity in a Polarizing Time


      A410

      This workshop will explore how one independent school, one community organization, and one public school district came together to create curriculum and programming around understanding refugee and immigration issues. Presenters will share practical examples from across K–12 education that focus on building empathy in order to reframe discourse in one of the most politically divided counties in the nation. You will also have the opportunity to dive into a case study about how a fourth grade social studies unit on immigration in American history was transformed into a year-long service-learning and inclusion curriculum that empowered students as change makers.
      Presented By Clare Sisisky and Carolyn Villanueva, Collegiate School (VA)
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      TrackEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
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  • Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
    • “We Want to Hire Leaders of Color—There Just Aren’t Any Candidates!” (Actually, There Are) PART Two


      B405

      Part two of this workshop will continue the conversation about hiring leaders of color in independent schools.
      Presented ByAlison Park, Blink Consulting; Steve Morris and Percy Abram, The Bush School
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      TrackLeadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
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    • Auxiliary Workers: Portraits of Micro-aggressions Faced by Invisible Teachers and Their Work in Independent Schools


      A305

      Independent schools often subtly exclude auxiliary workers by virtue of the design and limitations of their work. A school community may routinely overlook their overall contributions, talents, and stories for reasons that are varied and complex. This workshop is designed to encourage you to examine and assess your school’s community and culture regarding auxiliary workers. You will gain new insight for multicultural education, curriculum development, community building, and school leadership.
      Presented ByFrancoise Saint-Clair, The School At Columbia University (NY)
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      TrackLeadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
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