• Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
    • #POC4EachOther: Bridging Activism Between Communities of Color


      A304

      The powerful #BlackLivesMatter movement has transformed our cultural approaches to awareness, action, and advocacy. We see examples of solidarity and bridging communities of color in #AsiansforBlackLivesMatters and the historical work of Yuri Kochiyama. Why is it important to show up for each other? What do we do when others push back on race-centric movements? What does this look like in our schools? Join us to explore how we must apply an intersectional lens to our activist work and why the frameworks of whiteness and white supremacy created tensions in community-of-color organizing.
      Presented By Liza Talusan, The Park School (MA); Tinia Merriweather and Ricco Siasoco, Ethical Culture Fieldston School (NY); Rochelle Reodica, San Francisco University High School (CA)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • “What Do You Really Do?”: Defining the Purpose and Professionalizing the Practice of Diversity Leadership


      A303

      Imagine what would happen if your school hired a chief financial officer who has successfully managed a household budget but has no formal financial management training, no corporate or school finance experience, and no knowledge of accounting best practices. This would never happen, right? Then why does it happen when schools hire diversity leaders? This workshop will share a framework — grounded in best practices, diversity management research, and professional experience — that outlines five levels of diversity leadership in independent schools.
      Presented By Eric Polite, Leadership for Educational Equity
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • A Conversation: The Fluidity of Gender, Racial, and Sexual Identities in Young People Today


      A407

      Young people are exploding the traditional binaries and boxes that society has used to define identity. As the understanding of gender, race, and sexual orientation as social constructs becomes more socially accepted, gender is no longer about being just male or female. Race is no longer about being just black or white. And sexuality is no longer limited to being gay or straight. Join this interactive conversation about the implications of these emerging identities and ideas in a school community. *This workshop is offered in two tracks: one for educators of color (Friday) and one for white educators (Saturday). https://padlet.com/vsavas/nwi3s5hrctyv 
      Presented ByMorgan Darby, San Francisco University High School (CA); Vanessa Savas, Cambridge Friends School (MA)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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      Related Documents
    • Developing Strategies to Support Students and Families of Color Through The College Admissions Process


      A404

      This session will help school administrators and college counselors develop programming for students and families of color, including first-generation individuals who have limited experience with college admission. Drawing on their wide range of experience working with diverse populations at the secondary and post-secondary levels, the presenters will focus on managing expectations and dispelling myths. You’ll explore topics such as developing productive partnerships with community-based organizations, finding appropriate school fit so that students thrive, and understanding the realities and misperceptions surrounding affirmative action policies in college admission.
      Presented ByKhaliah Williams and Carolyn Middleton, The Berkeley Carroll School (NY)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • Teaching American History Through the Lens of Critical Race Theory


      A401

      So many recent events have drawn national attention to issues of racism and race — the deaths of Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner, Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, and Sandra Bland, as well as the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement. As teachers of American history, how do we best respond to this? We believe the goal of social studies education is to improve the human condition. Critical race theory allows us to guide our students to awareness, inclusion, equity, and empowerment for all. Critical race theory challenges the dominant narrative and promotes the voices of the marginalized and under-represented. By teaching a narrative that helps students see and navigate the world, we can empower them to seek change and justice.
      Presented ByTed Chen and Merissa Reed, Lakeside School (WA)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • The “Trump Effect” in Independent Schools: Supporting Student Diversity After a Racially Divisive Election


      A312

      Hateful rhetoric and attacks against people of color entered some of our independent school communities during the 2016 presidential election. As a result, students of color and student diversity initiatives have come under pressure. The way the media have rewarded the overt racism of the Donald Trump campaign has created an atmosphere where “political correctness” has been framed as a liberal tool to suppress free speech. Students who underscore microaggressions in juvenile humor are called hypocrites for allegedly being intolerant of conservative voices. This workshop will reflect upon what we’ve done to help our students of color during this election cycle, and what we can do to continue to support them in the wake of the election and the inauguration of a new president.
      Presented ByTim Rosenwong and Sidra Smith, Pacific Ridge School (CA); Marcus Chang, The Bishop's School (CA); Rosetta Lee, Seattle Girls' School (WA)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • The Children are Watching: Developing Principled Relationships Between People of Color and White Colleagues


      A405

      Given the long legacy of racism in schools, how do you ensure that the working relationships between people of color and white colleagues are based on respect and promote equity? This workshop’s presenters will share a case study about their 13-year partnership as well as examples from other teacher-administrator cross-racial relationships. You will examine the contexts, pitfalls, and transformations that can happen when you learn to speak with and not for your colleagues. You will also look at how teaching is enhanced by authentic connections based in both an understanding of and respect for racial identities and how they influence teaching and learning.
      Presented ByElizabeth Denevi, Mid West Ed; Mariama Richards, Friends' Central School (PA)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • The Right to Fulfill Their Dreams: Designing and Destigmatizing Support Services for Students of Color


      A403

      This workshop examines a case study highlighting the need for more professionals of color in independent school support services. Drawing on the perspectives of a learning specialist, an advocate for students of color, and a counselor, we will share and brainstorm best practices with you about changing practices and techniques to destigmatize support services and ensure that all students are comfortable reaching out for support.
      Presented By Stephen Wright, Eleannor Maajid, and Pamela Buchanan Miller, Latin School of Chicago (IL)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • Weaving Cultural Competence Through After School Programming


      A302

      This workshop will explore ways in which after-school programs can accommodate children with different interests: visual arts, performing arts, technology, creative writing, makerspaces, sports, movement, and homework help. Additionally, we will cover the significance of after-school as a crucial time for social-emotional learning, building executive functioning skills, and developing cultural awareness and competency. You’ll discover how exposing students to different teaching styles and enrichment models can lead to a more authentic model of diversity.
      Presented By Francoise Saint-Clair and Katy Saintil, The School At Columbia University (NY)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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    • Writing the Wrongs: Creating the Space for Important Conversations Through Slam Poetry


      A402

      By design, private schools are exclusive spaces. As we groom our students to become critical thinkers, it is imperative to hear their voices and their experiences in order to transform these exclusive spaces into inclusive ones. This workshop will show how educators can create space for inclusive dialogues through slam poetry clubs and curricula. Performance poetry can create a vehicle for students to explore their own identity, connect with other students, and blossom into leaders and change agents. Ultimately, slam poetry can offer a megaphone to a group of marginalized voices that may otherwise go unheard.
      Presented ByNina Candia, The Madeira School (VA)
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      TrackBuilding Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
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      Related Documents
  • Equity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
    • Beyond Curry & Cows: Teaching South Asia


      A305

      Engage in interactive activities to explore the rich cultural diversity of South Asia. Discuss curriculum resources on geography, history, religion, language, and the arts. The presenter will also address some of the complexities of teaching a culture that is “your own” vs. one that is not, as well as student perceptions of teacher knowledge.
      Presented ByNayantara Mhatre, Bank Street School for Children (NY)
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      TrackEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
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    • Colorism in Islam: #BlackintheMSA #BlackMuslim


      A311

      For the last 15 years, society has focused so much on Islamophobia from the Arab and South Asian perspective that we often forget that African and African American individuals make up 25 percent of Muslims in the United States. In this workshop, we will explore exclusion of African Americans from this religion by Arabic and South Asian Muslims. We will examine how these unconscious biases play a major role on independent school campuses and communities.
      Presented By Khadijah-Ali Campbell, Phillips Exeter Academy (NH)
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      TrackEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
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    • Stories from Home: Inviting Everyone Into a Diversity Conversation


      A408

      Although it’s not always easy to identify with a particular affinity group, it seems that everyone can speak about the place(s) from which they come. In this workshop, we will demonstrate how to use the idea of “home” as the foundation for diversity work. We’ll guide you through a program that goes beyond storytelling; it uses project planning and tradition sharing to promote more authentic and open conversations about how we see ourselves, each other, and our schools. You will find a definition of home for yourself, use your personal exploration of home to better understand your students‘ stories, find ways to move the conversation beyond the classroom, and reimagine the way diversity is discussed in your own school community.
      Presented ByAngela Balcita and Ileana Imhoff, The Park School of Baltimore (MD)
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      TrackEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
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      Related Documents
    • The Rise of Islamo-racism: Understanding, Teaching and Tackling Systemic Oppression of Muslims


      B403

      Students watch how we respond to terror attacks, the refugee crisis, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and the rise of hate crimes against Muslims and those perceived to be Muslim in the West. When we are silent, they learn from that silence — learning who to have empathy for and who gets our indifference. While the process of racializing Muslims is nothing new, it often goes unexamined. This workshop will give you tools to have more nuanced conversations about Muslims as a racialized group and propose ways to empower students to solve current world conflicts.
      Presented By Melissa Mirza, San Francisco University High School (CA)
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      TrackEquity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices
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  • Leadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
    • Family Leave Policies: Challenges and Opportunities for Working Parents in Independent Schools


      A314

      How can family leave policies in independent schools create a more equitable climate for faculty and staff? In addition to providing data on current practices and policies relevant to working parents, this workshop is designed to be a safe forum for sharing resources and affinity group conversation. Through large and small group discussions, you will be encouraged to share your experiences, suggestions, and support for each other. As two working moms in independent schools, we are interested in improving the climate for our own families as well as yours.
      Presented ByAngela Miklavcic, The Episcopal Academy (PA); Priscilla Morales,The Park School of Baltimore (MD)
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      TrackLeadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
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    • Fulfilling the Dream: The History of Black Greek Leadership and the People of Color Conference


      A313

      Thirty years ago, five educators (all members of Black Greek Letter Organizations) heeded a call to action when the need arose for formal support of the roles, values, and voices of people of color in independent schools. Now we hope you’ll join us to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the first National Conference for Teachers and Administrators of Color in Independent Schools. Hear the stories, triumphs, and trials directly from those who were there. Learn why they are committed to preserving the history and legacy of PoCC, the successor to that conference and the flagship of NAIS’s commitment to equity and justice in teaching and learning.
      Presented By Shanelle Robinson, Friends Academy (NY); Antonio Williams, William Penn Charter School (PA)
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      TrackLeadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
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    • No Ways Tired: Graduates of NAIS' Fellowship for Aspiring Heads Share the Road to Headship


      B308

      Explore the stories of three female African American senior administrators who rose to school headships. They will share their experiences with the NAIS Fellowship for Aspiring Heads. In addition, they’ll describe their personal and professional journeys to developing a solid professional profile, building relationships with hiring consultants, and dealing with the inequities faced by women of color in the hiring process. Hear their strategies for embracing a leadership mindset, bracing for denial and defeat, and staying the course to headship.
      Presented By Donna Lindner, The Agnes Irwin School (PA); Brenda Crawley, Sandy Spring Friends School (MD); Kimberly Ridley, The Gordon School (RI)
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      TrackLeadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
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    • Words of Wisdom: Voices of Women of Color in Leadership


      B405

      A panel of women heads of school will share their leadership journeys in this interactive conversation about their pathways, their lived experiences, and purposeful steps to consider when pursuing leadership opportunities. The moderator is Sylvia Rodriguez Vargas, who will use her doctoral work as a framework for discussion. The panelists will share how their formative experiences inform their approaches to leadership within a framework that is culturally relevant. Cultural intelligence,cultural competency, and cross-cultural networking shape the ways in which many of these women navigate and exercise leadership. You’ll find that a central part of culturally relevant leadership involves practices that are centered on fluid, equitable relationships that encourage collaborative, reflective decision making and are sensitive to skills and behaviors appropriate in intercultural situations.
      Presented ByAyanna Hill-Gill, Atlanta Girls' School (GA); Joan Hill, The Lamplighter School (TX); Suzanna Jemsby, The Galloway School (GA); Marcia Prewitt Spiller, Woodward Academy (GA)Facilitator: Sylvia Rodriguez Vargas, Atlanta Girls' School (GA)
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      TrackLeadership and Management for Equity and Inclusion
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  • Organizational Development and Institutional Change
    • Are the Numbers Enough?


      A406

      Imagine that your head of school has just ask you to lead a task force to assess your school’s practices in regard to equity and inclusion and also to measure the cultural competency of your school community (students, faculty/staff, parents, and more). Where do you begin? And what do you do when you’re told, “Our school is quite diverse. Why would we need a diversity practitioner?” In this session, find out how to get naysayers to see the value of focusing on the quality of a school community in addition to the quantity of a diverse populations. You will walk away with tools and resources to take back to your school that delineate what’s included in a diverse and inclusive campus climate.
      Presented ByTerri Wallace, Quest Academy (IL); Jackie Wells, Maumee Valley Country Day School (OH)
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      TrackOrganizational Development and Institutional Change
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    • How Collaborative Leadership Supports Organizational Change, Strategies, and Conversations in a Diverse School


      A301

      The ability to collaborate within diverse groups is a skill our students must master to thrive in our rapidly changing world. But how can we teach this fundamental skill if we are unable to consistently use collaboration ourselves in our daily work? This workshop will present a way to understand and engage in institutional collaboration using a principle-based leadership approach, the Collaborative Operating System. You can these principles and collaborative framework to better engage the collective intelligence of any diverse team’s thinking, engagement, and strategic problem-solving ability.
      Presented ByJoanne Chu and Carri A. Carver, Woodward Academy (GA)
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      TrackOrganizational Development and Institutional Change
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    • Trustees and Heads Working for Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity


      A408

      An innovative grassroots program in the San Francisco Bay Area is bringing trustees and heads together to enhance governance efforts and resources surrounding diversity, equity, and inclusion. Attend this workshop to learn how this program has identified vital areas of responsibility for heads and boards and to discuss cultural competency needs within any board. Participate in a generative discussion about what it means to be a diversity, inclusion, and equity leader in independent schools.
      Presented ByAlison Park, Blink Consulting; Alex Wong, Town School for Boys (CA); Barre Fong, Katherine Delmar Burke School (CA)
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      TrackOrganizational Development and Institutional Change
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    • What About the Content? Revising Curricula for Educational Equity Through Human and Civil Rights


      A316

      Has teaching for social justice and educational equity penetrated core secondary school curricula? If we are to fully serve our students, the core academic coursework cannot remain unchanged. In this workshop, you will analyze selected independent school curricula for principles of human and civil rights, address questions of student inclusion and access, imagine an alternate vision of what your own school might teach in the future, and identify points of access to the process of curriculum revision.
      Presented By Richard Kassissieh and E-chieh Lin, University Preparatory Academy (WA)
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      TrackOrganizational Development and Institutional Change
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  • Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
    • Let's Get Real: Exploring Race, Class, and Gender Identities in the Classroom


      B404

      Two teachers, a black man and white woman, developed a method to facilitate healthy identity formation in the context of a diverse learning community. They offer a series of teaching strategies to encourage conversation and personal reflection, enabling students to think creatively, rather than stereotypically, about difference. Find out how this model helps students learn to safely explore their race, class, and gender identities; share stories and thoughts with peers; learn more through reading and research; and ultimately take action to affect social change in their communities. Through empathetic listening, positive peer acceptance, the inclusion of diverse ideas, and critical collaboration, students can learn more about themselves, each other, and the world they live in. The outcome: Individuality and diversity flourish simultaneously.
      Presented By Martha Caldwell and Oman Frame, The Paideia School (GA)
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      TrackRacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
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    • Okay Ladies, Now Let's Get In Formation! Enhancing Ethnic Identity Development of African-American Adolescent Girls


      A409

      Increase your knowledge of ethnic identity development in African American female students and explore how academic and social environments directly affect their overall health. Dive into related theories and empirical studies, which explore the correlation between ethnic identity development, academic achievement, and well-being. Come away equipped to integrate this knowledge into your pedagogical approach and incorporate curricula that improve ethnic identity development; reduce risk factors, poor self-concept, and self-defeating behaviors; and increase positive outcomes for your African American female students.
      Presented By LaNaadrian Easterling, La Jolla Country Day School (CA)
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      TrackRacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
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    • The New Face of African-American Literature: Teaching a Post-Blackness Curriculum


      B401

      In a world where schools increasingly face discussions of race relations and #BlackLivesMatter, our students — both white and black — need the tools to understand and discuss the experience of being black in America. This workshop will look at strategies for making an African American literature curriculum feel more immediately relevant, using literature as a springboard to looking at blackness from a sociological standpoint. Come prepared to discuss what your school’s current curriculum looks like and learn about tools for upper school educators to implement partial or whole curricular change. One central focus of this workshop is how to safely move students from thinking to feeling.
      Presented By Malikah Goss, Lakeside School (WA)
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      TrackRacial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
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  • Self-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
    • Moving Up: Career Advancement for Educators of Color


      B402

      Discover a process to create your own path to a fulfilling career and make intentional decisions about growth in your current job. This session will guide you in identifying the right people to provide support, feedback, and inspiration for your development. Through role plays and scenario simulations, you will practice navigating conversations about augmenting your current job. Most important, you’ll gain a better understanding of when it’s time to move on from your current role or school. You will leave the session with a personal career map to guide you in important career decisions.
      Presented ByPearl Rock Kane, The Klingenstein Center; Mark Reed, Charlotte Country Day School (NC)
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      TrackSelf-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
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    • Technicolor: Sharing Our Experiences of Transitioning into Technology and Innovation


      A315

      Are you involved in technology in independent schools? Would you like to pursue career options related to technology? Come listen to a panel of people of color who currently work in this empowering field. We will explain what we do in our schools, share our unique stories, and offer advice and insights for others considering doing something technology-related in their schools. Most important, we will talk about the potential impact we have on the lives of our students as people of color in this critical educational field.
      Presented By E. David Miller, Lakeside School - Middle School Campus (WA); Gina Marcel, The School At Columbia University (NY); Tye Campbell, Far Hills Country Day School (NJ); Camilla Calkins, Lakeside School (WA)
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      TrackSelf-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
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    • Women of Color in Independent Schools: Living Being Mary Jane Post-It Lives


      B409

      ​When Being Mary Jane debuted on BET in the summer of 2013, women viewers all over the country either fell in love with the lead character, Mary Jane, or wondered, “What is wrong with her?” For women of color in particular, the complexities of race, class, gender, and sexuality offered more varied and nuanced perspectives on the storylines that play out from week to week. The hallmarks of every episode of Being Mary Jane were the affirmations (and cautionary warnings) she wrote to herself on sticky notes as reminders of the life she wanted to live. Join us as we delve into our Post-It lives.
      Presented By​Veda Robinson, Edmund Burke School (DC); Stephanie Carrillo, Campbell Hall (CA); Danica Tisdale Fisher, Phillips Academy (MA)
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      TrackSelf-Efficacy and Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
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      Related Documents