Workshops

Below you will find a listing of all general conference workshops and Equity Seminars. With your conference registration, you have access to ALL general conference workshops. They do not require additional registration. On Demand workshops are asynchronous and can be taken at any time; all other general conference workshops have a specific time.

Please note that Equity Seminars, offered only on Monday, November 29, and Tuesday, November 30, require pre-registration and an extra fee to attend.

All times Eastern

Click or tap on a workshop to get expanded details, including the workshop summary, presenters, and more. You can search and sort this list to find what you're looking for.

Title Block Time Summary Track
Small Activists, Big Impact: Cultivating Anti-Racists and Activists in Kindergarten On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: In the current climate, it is especially important and necessary to delve into social justice with some of the smallest learners. This workshop aims to expose, offer, and create a new lens for teaching social justice to kindergarten students. Learn how to begin teaching social justice in your classroom, incorporate books and vocabulary into lessons, and discuss the "-isms" with your students. Expect to leave with examples of practical lessons to use in the classroom as well as long-term projects to culminate at the end of the year. Get a roadmap to take your anti-bias and anti-racist teaching to the next level.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Traci Allen, The Wesley School (CA)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, and Activism
From Minor Feelings to Major Lessons: Takeaways from a Teacher-Developed, Student-Centered, and Pandemic-Era AAPI Course On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Learn about our experiences designing and teaching a new interdisciplinary course on Asian American history and literature in winter 2021 at Phillips Exeter Academy. Through extensive interviews we conducted, the experiences and reflections of our students foreground the presentation to highlight effective pedagogical methods and curricular choices. Get practical strategies for developing a culturally responsive curriculum and create a community of practice to learn with and from each other. Find out how we supported our students’ socio-emotional well-being through a tumultuous term.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Hannah Lim, Iolani School (HI); Wei-Ling Woo
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, and Activism
Leveraging Student Voices in Curriculum Implementation and Design On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: BIPOC students can inadvertently end up receiving outward messages about inclusivity without actually experiencing racially inclusive practices in their daily lives. Hear about one school’s research-based initiative that attempted to bridge this gap: the formation of a student-centered anti-racist curriculum development group. This process is messy and requires flexibility and revisions. Learn initial perspectives on preparing the ground for this work, such as garnering community buy-in, creating group norms, and creating a unifying mission statement. Get an outline of key practices of the group’s activities, such as goal setting, translating goals into actionable steps, and setting parameters to ensure the sustainability of student engagement. Come prepared to learn, share perspectives, and brainstorm on initial thoughts for your school.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: David Hernandez, Mychal Johnson, and Asako Kurosaka-Jost, Brentwood School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
Toward a Comprehensive and Identity-Based Wellness Program On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Examine the case study of developing a comprehensive and culturally responsive wellness program centering identity development at Lakeside School in Seattle. Explore how the Personal Development & Wellness department was formed for grades 5-12, including professional development for faculty/staff and programming for families. Dive deeply into how the department structures curriculum through the lens of identity, both explicitly and implicitly. Explore sample lessons from grades 5-9 that center diversity, equity, inclusion, belonging, and justice. Discuss how the program has connected to other DEI-focused school programs, including our Parents and Guardians Association and our Student Support Teams. Finally, hear about future directions for growth, such as student leadership and curriculum co-creation, and program assessment.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Julie Lutton and Felicia Wilks, Lakeside School (WA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
Inclusion Dashboarding: Steps and Guidance for Measuring Inclusion On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Join us for a guide to inclusion dashboarding for schools that wish to quantitatively collect and review data regarding students' sense of inclusion to drive institutional change. Shifting school culture away from relying solely on anecdotes to understand inclusion is important if we want to measure how the institution is improving in this area—or not. The process of inclusion dashboarding involves creating student surveys, administering them, reviewing the data, identifying themes and patterns, and sharing results visually. It's a heavy undertaking, but one worth exploring.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Dot Kowal, Sonoma Academy (CA); Kalyan Balaven, Dunn School (CA); Nasif Iskandar, University High School (CA); Nancy Nagramada, The San Francisco School (CA); Rochelle Reodica, Rochelle Reodica Consulting
Data Use in Activism: Evidence-based Equity Practice, Research and Evaluation
Let Me Tell My Story: Supporting Students of Color to Research/Document Their Lived Experiences On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: As students of color navigate life in independent schools, they find themselves experiencing biases, inequities, lack of representation, and injustice regardless of how much inclusivity (or lack thereof) the school claims to have. Explore different qualitative approaches to support student-led research that documents students’ lived experiences in white-dominant spaces. Get introduced to the systematic investigation of social phenomena, aiming at describing, understanding, and interpreting your stories. Walk away with a practical guide to adapt and facilitate student-led research that will push schools to be accountable for systemic racism and marginalization, and that will be a catalyst for changes to reverse those actions that continue to destroy the lives of Black, brown, indigenous, Asian, and other children of color.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Yerko Sepulveda-Larraguibel and Rennie Greenfield, Hawken School (OH)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Habari Gani Menta (What’s Happening)? Black Male School Leaders and Mentorship On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: According to African customs and traditions, the raising and education of a child was a shared village responsibility. One person, not a family member, was assigned the responsibility to ask questions and listen carefully to the younger child. In Swahili, this questioning person was called, habari gani menta, which in English means “the person [mentor] who asks what’s happening”. Explore culturally sensitive paradigms of mentoring to support Black male school leaders and heads of school in their role in protecting cultural legacies and traditions and in the training and supporting of others. Take this opportunity to create and build a supportive community circle. Engage collectively in an affirming conversation, asking questions and carefully listening to each other.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Phillip A. Smith, Teachers College at Columbia University; Bartley Jeannoute, Abington Friends School (PA)
Leadership & Management for Equity, Inclusion, Anti-racism, and Social Justice
Using a DEIJ Lens to Make School-wide Decisions On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Explore how big decisions can be made at schools in an inclusive and equitable way at the board and senior leadership level through the consistent use of a DEIJ lens. How can developing and using a set of questions in meetings or decision-making processes help us ensure we are uncovering blind spots and recognizing who may be missing from the conversation? How we may be limiting access unintentionally? Use common scenarios developed by this group's lived educational experience alongside already developed DEIJ questions from other independent schools to see what using a DEIJ lens may look and feel like in school decisions. Share your feedback and thoughts as to how to develop a similar process at your own institution.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Gulliver LaValle, Hillbrook School (CA)
Leadership & Management for Equity, Inclusion, Anti-racism, and Social Justice
First-Generation DEI Practitioners: How to Survive and Grow in Independent Schools On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Examine evidenced-based lessons learned from practitioners of color with over 20 years of experience in independent schools, including PoCC/SDLC co-founder, Randolph Carter, and others. Hear a veteran panel present a systems approach to the DEI practitioner’s role that holds schools accountable for their partnership in the recruitment, retention, growth, and empowerment of its BIPOC community. Get an introduction to data-driven processes to guide your work as well as networking opportunities to support their personal self-care. Learn how the skills, knowledge, and attitudes acquired in the practitioner’s role can transfer into a school leadership position or possible entrepreneurial career path.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Steven Davis, The Institute for Human Relations (DE); Randolph Carter, East Ed. (DC); Johnnie Foreman, Gilman School (MD)
Leadership & Management for Equity, Inclusion, Anti-racism, and Social Justice
Help the Unseen: Why Students of Color Need Visible Communities of Care On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Do you feel untrained or apprehensive to adequately express the complexity of the race, gender, culture, and ethnicity that impacts students' performance? BIPOC students feel unseen, academically and emotionally unprepared, and overwhelmed, and struggle with microaggressions and racism. Yet, they show up to school, endure more stress and anxiety, cover essential parts of their best selves, and stay stuck in unprocessed grief. Can you adjust your lens and expand your perspective to promote a climate of awareness and support within their peer groups and communities of care? Learn tools that empower students, lessen loads, stimulate conversations, reduce stigma, and strengthen interpersonal relationships. Help them reflect and improve their mental health. Let's identify and understand how to transform our lives as individuals, parents, and educators by our daily choices.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Susan Toler Carr, Justin Carr Wants World Peace Foundation; Dahlia Ashford, Shenandoah University
Leadership & Management for Equity, Inclusion, Anti-racism, and Social Justice
Building an Equitable and Liberating Mindset On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Join us to address the five prevailing mindsets in education that harm children of color. Engage in the rewarding process of creating a personal, equity-driven vision statement as a tool to confront inequitable mindsets in your own practice or school community. Explore the history of marginalization of communities of color and how it has led to an inequity of resources and a profound loss of civil and human rights for people of color. Address education's most prevailing inequitable mindsets of color blindness, cultural conflicts, the opportunity myth, low expectations, and context neutral mindset that harm children. Create an equity-driven professional vision statement as a tool and guiding principle to confront inequities in the education of children of color.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Richard Ledgister, The Center for Urban Education and Advocacy; Jennifer Porter-Smith, Nap Ford Community Schools, Legends Academy (FL)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
I Can't Pretend They Didn't Hire Me for This: Performing Identity Labor in Schools On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Teachers of color in predominantly white schools are constantly called on to do extra work because they are people of color. The work of involuntarily managing the emotions of others and educating peers is exhausting and leads to predictable burnout. Identity labor is the special type of emotional labor performed by persons with a marginalized identity when they are in culturally dominant environments. Delve into findings from a study that investigates the experiences of teachers of color who are performing identity la
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Stephanie Bramlett, Phillips Exeter Academy (NH)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Emotional Intelligence, Embodiment, and Mindfulness: Strategies for Combatting Racial Battle Fatigue On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Learn how to practice, apply, and grow through emotional intelligence, embodiment, and mindfulness (meditation). Recent research has acknowledged and confirmed the racial exhaustion and emotional energy spent to counter microaggressions. Also, there is empirical evidence that being "the only one" in the room correlates with stress and fatigue, unique to the BIPOC experience. While a portion of the workshop will focus on offering background and data, the main focus is to center this experience of empowerment through guided embodiment and mindfulness meditations. We will also build self-efficacy for facing the daily challenges of predominantly white institutions through activities of reflection and respite. The overarching goal is to provide support strategies for your wellness and overall mental health.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Amber Gravely, S.O.S. Student Opportunities for Success
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit, and Soul
Women of Color on the Way Up: Strategic Steps to Advance Our Leadership Journeys Together On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Join this affinity space for women of color who have an eye on senior leadership or wish to pivot into different leadership roles. At your school, you may find yourself as the "only one" or "one of few." Connecting with other women who wish to grow professionally outside of their current roles and leverage opportunities to be viewed as leaders in their respective school communities is key. Creating authentic relationships rather than blanket networking is necessary to gain confidence and perspective. Get details on specific action steps and to-do's to undertake if you wish to solidify your progress toward leadership and discover how to make the most of your connections to other women of color so we can all move up together.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Dot Kowal, Sonoma Academy (CA); Joy Prince, The Agnes Irwin School (PA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit, and Soul
SKY Wellness for School Leaders (I Can Breathe: Healing, Health, and Wellness from the Sky) On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Working toward equity requires us to have clarity of mind, compassion of heart, and intention in our actions. The trauma of systemic racism often blocks these qualities as we hold the stress of it in our bodies, impacting all aspects of our life including health, relationships, learning, and identity. SKY Schools’ evidence-based social-emotional learning programming uses the breath, our most accessible tool, to relieve trauma, energize, empower, and restore. Join us to experience our culturally responsive, research-based workshop with social-emotional learning activities and breath work for school communities. It is a space to share, heal, and build community as we reckon with the impact of racial disparity. Meet us in a space to rediscover the power that lies within when we practice self-care.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Ambrose Wilson-Brown and Susan Ramsundarsingh, SKY Schools (DC)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit, and Soul
The Black-Jew Dialogues: A Cross Cultural-Comedy On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: The Black-Jew Dialogues is a provocative two-actor comedy that explores the absurdity of prejudice and racism. This show teaches audience members how to engage in cross-generational and cross-cultural dialogue. It combines fast-paced sketches, puppets, a game show, and a post-show discussion to give the audience a historic perspective on history and the growing need for intersectional social justice activism. We use the African American and Jewish experience in America to show that the biases and "isms" that all nondominant groups deal with have to be attacked with unity. Also, the energy of youth must be supported by the experience of age. The 21st century has only intensified many of the long-standing social issues: This is the time to transform advocacy.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Ronald Jones and Zach Bellus, Dialogues on Diversity
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
The Leadership Institute for People of Color (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Gain powerful strategies to advance to the next level of leadership while building your network of fellow leaders, mentors, and sponsors in this unique seminar tailored for BIPOC educators. The Leadership Institute for People of Color offers state-of-the-art leadership development tools, strategies, and resources including understanding how cognitive preferences influence leadership through The Herrmann Brain Dominance Instrument (HBDI) Inventory. The institute format includes in-the-moment coaching, peer exchange, and post-institute follow-up, all in an encouraging atmosphere designed to nurture and propel a compelling vision for fulfilling your career goals. Participants gain an inside view into critical moves for long-term professional and personal growth and success. Through facilitated dialogue with top leaders of color, participants access wisdom to help tackle issues including working effectively with mentors and sponsors, evaluating your advocate in the search process, and critical skills leaders wish they had before assuming their positions. Attend this institute to build a cohort of colleagues, mentors, champions and sponsors to walk alongside you in your leadership journey.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Leadership Institute
  • Presenters: Nicole A. DuFauchard, The Advent School (MA); James Calleroz White, The Galloway School (GA); Felicia McCrary, The Galloway School (GA)
The Leadership Institute for People of Color
ESF01. Auditing DEI: So Much More Than a Survey (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: “DEI work is never done.” True, but we should still be accountable for progress. How is DEI going at your school? How do you know? Maybe you administer a survey, collect some demographic information, and even have an inclusion dashboard. Explore how to connect those individual elements of assessment within a rigorous, robust, and impactful DEI auditing framework. Join us to deepen your understanding of DEI auditing—what it is, why it’s vital, and how to design an audit that demonstrates diversity, equity, and inclusion. Workshop fundamental audit questions about what your priorities are and how can you objectively assess “inclusion” and “belonging.” Learn to situate auditing within an ongoing, formative, strategic-growth process and take stock of your institution’s auditing foundation and growth edges.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Alison Park, Blink Consulting; Stacey Kertsman, Blink Consulting
Data Use in Activism: Evidence-based Equity Practice, Research and Evaluation
ESF02. The Art of Giving and Receiving the Gift of Racial Feedback: Building Joyful Cross-Racial Allyship (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: How can direct racial feedback lead to meaningful cross-racial collaboration and programmatic change? While we understand that moving through racial ruptures to genuine repair nurtures interpersonal connection, individual transformation, and institutional equity, we lack stories, models, and strategies for giving and receiving racial feedback, developing robust cross-racial allyship, and fostering true equity and inclusion. We first crossed paths at the 2019 CATDC Women + Leadership Conference, in the midst of a public racial miscue. Join this interactive workshop to share the concrete, actionable strategies that allowed us (a Black woman offering racial feedback and white woman receiving it) to move through a fraught moment to enduring cross-racial collaboration and programmatic change. Bring your thoughts, hopes, wishes, and worries. Get time for discussion and application.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Nikkia Young, Head-Royce School (CA); Lisa Haney, California Teacher Development Collaborative
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
ESF04. Cultural Value Leadership: A Leadership Model for DEI (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Join us to learn about cultural value leadership (CVL), a researched-based leadership model. This recently published leadership style provides measurable ways to evaluate the cultural value in a situation, activity, or an individual’s participation. In CVL, culture is considered the intellectual capital in the application of culture philanthropy leadership strategies for individuals, entrepreneurs, influencers, public organizations, educational institutions, and corporations (Herrera, 2021). The advantage of CVL over traditional leadership models (transactional, servant, transformational, etc.) is the opportunity for leaders to make an impact through positive cultural conduct in situations or in the lives of others, through shared ethical values. We will officially unveil resources from the Cultural Value Institute during this seminar.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Veronica Herrera, The McCallie School (TN)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
ESF05. Do You See What I Mean? Facilitating Courageous Conversations Visually (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: As educators and activists leading the work around diversity, equity, and inclusion in our schools, we are often called on to facilitate courageous conversations across identity, power, and difference. Though there are many dialogue models and tools, visuals can help set the stage, support thinking, and catalyze breakthroughs. Engage with veteran facilitators to learn common facilitation models, avoid pitfalls, and manage polarity. Learn visual facilitation from experts to help people see issues and perspectives more clearly. Join us for an opportunity to unpack practical strategies on facilitating courageous conversations, practice facilitating, and leave with a visual toolset to deepen your practice.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Kawai Lai, Kawai Lai Persons; Tamisha Williams, Tamisha Williams Consulting, LLC
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
ESF06. Educational Justice for Black Girls: A Call for Radical, Transformational Pedagogy (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: All Black girls are beautiful and brilliant, representing diverse cultural backgrounds and social identities. As brilliant and gifted as Black girls are, we know they are not thriving to their full potential in K–12 schools as a result of oppressive systemic and institutional barriers. Our guiding text, Teaching Beautiful, Brilliant Black Girls, calls for a radical, transformational pedagogy that centers the lived experiences of all Black girls. It is time for the American education system to do right by—and with—Black girls, by providing them equitable access to a Pan-African, culturally engaging, relevant, and responsive education. Join us to explore critical strategies for transforming your classroom to create spaces where Black girls thrive!
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Shemariah Arki, The Kent State University Press; Omobolade Delano-Oriaran, St Norbert College; Marguerite Pennick, University of Wisconsin; Orinthia Swindell, Live Oak School (CA); Eddie Moore, Jr., The Privilege Institute
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
ESF07. From Trauma to Fatigue to Reintegration (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: What is culturally responsive teaching and why does it matter even more following the death of George Floyd? What is Black and white fatigue and how does it show up in our schools? We know that all educators, regardless of race, need to hold their students to high academic and behavior expectations, while building trust and rapport with them. This requires teachers to be aware of Black fatigue and how it surfaces in their students. Teachers must do the “inside-out” work, “developing the right mindset, engaging in self-reflection, checking for implicit biases, and practicing social-emotional awareness.” In other words, to move toward just intent, we, as educators, have to reach our students, understand the fatigue, and examine its impact.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Roslyn Benjamin, The Children's School (GA); Paula Farmer, The Berkeley School (CA); Yvonne Hendricks, Live oak School (CA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
ESF08. Leading Culture Change in Schools: Belonging, Equity, Inclusion, and Beyond (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Inequity is a deeply rooted and structured system, historically seeded and locally and globally cultivated. Yet when we engage in equity, inclusion, and belonging change work in our schools, we tend to approach the problem as an interpersonal issue rather than a cultural and systems one. In order to tend to the work of culture shifting for school change, join us to learn ways of thinking about and approaching culture change. While the strategies and tools you engage with here are transferable to all kinds of change-making work, we will focus on equity, inclusion, and belonging.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Rebecca Stilwell, Columbia University Teachers College; Nicole Furlonge, Columbia University Teachers College
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
ESF09. Master Class in Place-Based Education: A Context for Indigenous People in All Learning and Every School (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Current social tensions felt in the U.S. are playing out on Indigenous lands. We can learn lessons from Indigenous people on how to leverage place, land, and community to build inclusive, anti-bias education—yet the voices of Indigenous people play all too small a part in building a just and equitable world. Join us to examine Makawalu, a native Hawaiian term that embodies the concept of multiple perspectives, to unpack the principles of place-based learning and design a unit for your students or school. Participants will: (1) Learn about Makawalu, leveraging this native Hawaiian philosophy to understand place-based learning, (2) Learn about the 10 principles of place-based learning, and (3) Apply the 10 principles to build a place-based unit.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Kapono Ciotti, Wai'alae Elementary Public Charter School (HI)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
ESF10. ProEquity: A "Perspectives Consciousness" and Civics-Based Approach to Antiracist Education (For Seventh-12th Grade Social Studies Educators) (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: The ProEquity approach uses Hess and McAvoy’s “empirical vs. policy” framework to distinguish empirical questions such as “Does structural racism exist?” from policy questions such as “What should government do about structural racism?” (e.g., affirmative action). Treating structural racism as fact precludes racist comments that blame racial disparities on African Americans rather than on structural racism and allows educators to safely welcome conservative viewpoints. ProEquity uses “perspectives consciousness” strategies to increase psychological flexibility and foster a shared identity as a “we” society. It also uses “value tensions” to frame ideological policy positions as different prioritizations of values on a continuum rather than as “right or wrong.” This fosters political tolerance and encourages a “critical yet empowered” view of racism.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Ayo Heinegg Magwood, Uprooting Inequity LLC; Brigid Moriarty-Guerrero, Longview Education
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, and Activism
ESF11. SKY Breathwork and SEL for Educators (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: SKY Breathing Meditation offers tools to heal the pains, trauma, and stress of systemic racism and oppressive systems by bringing together people of color and allies in a space of healing and self-care. The cornerstone of this interactive, reflective workshop is the SKY Breathing practice, which utilizes specific rhythms of the breath to quickly and easily eliminate stress, revitalize the nervous system, and bring greater clarity and focus to the mind. It does this by taking advantage of the natural connection that already exists among the body, the breath, and the mind. Designed for educators, this seminar equips teachers, administrators, and youth advocates with evidence-based tools to manage your own stress and emotions, providing deep healing and transforming school cultures—allowing students to thrive.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Susan Ramsundarsingh, SKY Schools(Toronto, CA), SKY Schools, Ambrose Wilson-Brown, SKY Schools(WI), Deirdre Jackson, SKY School (CA), Elan Gepner-Dales, SKY Schools(GA)
ESF12. Systemic Racial Equity, Not Rhetoric: Strategies for—and Real Consequences of—Hiring with Cultural Competence (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: The goal of this seminar is for leaders to decide whether they are ready to restructure hiring processes in ways that actually build anti-racist equity and strengthen a climate to retain and reward those working for social justice within the school community. In a world shaped by COVID-19 and the continued sanctioned murder of people of color, this work is urgent. Any façade of “diversity” rhetoric must give way to effective systemic change for racial equity; to do otherwise is to reinforce a racist climate. Join us for opportunities to identify practices for attracting, hiring, and supporting the best culturally competent candidates for all positions, reminding members of the school community that racial equity is both an ongoing institutional imperative and a collective responsibility.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Cris Cullinan, Eugene; Amani Reed, The School at Columbia University (NY); Kalyan Balaven, The Dunn School (CA); Emma Coddington, Willamette University; Ruth Jurgensen, Prep for Prep
Leadership & Management for Equity, Inclusion, Anti-racism, and Social Justice
ESF13. Taking AIM to the Next Level: What to Do with Your AIM Survey Results (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Taking the step to engage your school community with the NAIS Assessment for Inclusivity and Multiculturalism (AIM) Survey provides schools with rich and robust data. Organizing and processing qualitative and quantitative data can be overwhelming, yet it is an important step in understanding survey results on your school’s climate, providing transparency within your community, and setting focused goals with tangible outcomes. After designing this process and ironing out the wrinkles along the way, our team is ready to share the details of our journey to help guide and support those looking to launch the AIM survey or coordinate next steps after receiving results.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Jennifer Turner, La Jolla Country Day School (CA); Marsha Poh, La Jolla Country Day School (CA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
ESF14. They Said What They Said! Leveraging BIPOC Student Voice to Enhance DEIJ Work in Schools (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Developing student leaders is essential to the mission of all schools. Yet, when Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) students demonstrate leadership skills by advocating for what they need, schools often do not listen. Join us to reflect on what it means to love, empower, and be accountable to BIPOC students by centering their needs and critically examining the extent to which the institution fulfills its mission for them. Using youth-led social movements as a model, discuss how institutions can respond to students’ experiences and work with students to co-create equitable school cultures and just learning communities moving forward.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Kalea Selmon, The Wells Collective; Shari Berga, The Wells Collective; Akailah Jenkins McItyre, The Wells Collective; Jennifer Moore, The Wells Collective; Talia Busby Titus, The Wells Collective
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
ESH01. BIPOC Empowerment and White Accountability: Addressing the Hidden Burden of Racial Interactions Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Join us to focus on evidence-based strategies to address the unconscious phenomenon of racial anxiety, which is the stress that Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) and white people may experience in cross-racial interactions. Link this body of work to understanding why racial microaggressions happen, even among colleagues or within institutions committed to equity. The cross-racial pair of facilitators draw on theoretical frameworks, research, and their collective repertoire of prior workshop experiences to support BIPOC participants in applying inner strengths to move through the impact of racialized encounters and hold white participants accountable in minimizing the burden of racial navigation for BIPOC.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Sandra Chapman, Chap Equity; Jessica MacFarlane, Independent Consultant
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit, and Soul
ESH02. Break Free from “Pet to Threat” and Authentically Sponsor Leaders of Color Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Sponsorship is one strategy that could help accelerate the career mobility of people of color to senior executive positions. Join us to unearth and demystify sponsorship, which is a strategy that could help aspiring school leaders combat racism. Explore groundbreaking research on the influence of sponsorship on the advancement of independent school heads and examine the experiences of people of color when they are perceived as “pets” and “threats” by gatekeepers and during senior-level searches. Gain strategies to position yourself to be successfully sponsored by people in positions of power or to be an effective sponsor of aspiring leaders of color.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Thu-Nga Morris, The Pingry School - Lower School (NJ); Sherry Coleman, Storbeck Search and Coleman Strategic Consulting; Staci Williams Seeley, Storbeck Search
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
ESH03. Cultivating Courage to Confront Complicated Legacies in Independent Schools: The Oneness Lab Experience at McCallie School Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Almost all independent schools have complicated legacies when it comes to race. The McCallie School (TN) is no exception. In 2021, the school embarked on a learning journey with Oneness Lab, a consultancy co-founded by a Black McCallie graduate. According to senior McCallie staff, the experience “…opened a way for us to talk truthfully, to think openly, and to act anew” reckoning with their complicated history and committed to changing their trajectory for DEIJ. Join us to explore the impactful journey and lasting commitments made by the McCallie School and get an introduction to the process staff experienced. Examine specific tools and exercises used to unlock the skill sets needed to go deeper than diversity and inspire courageous, informed, and strategic action.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Eric Dozier, The Oneness Lab; Homa Tavangar, The Oneness Lab; Sumner McCallie, McCallie School (TN)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
ESH05. Equity Begins with EQ Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: We want equity embedded into the fabric of our schools, but how do we get there? According to the National Equity Project, we must: “(1) reduce the predictability of who succeeds and who fails, (2) interrupt reproductive practices that negatively impact vulnerable and marginalized students, and (3) cultivate the unique gifts and talents of every student.” Join us to break down Elleithee’s Equity Taxonomy as a guide to navigate the road ahead. Designed to help educators clarify where they are on their own equity journey, the taxonomy outlines the empowered steps necessary to take our policies, programs, and people where our students need them to be. It also intertwines cultural proficiency with emotional intelligence (EQ) and can be used to address inequities across social identities.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Mona Elleithee, Renewed Harmony (SC)
Leadership & Management for Equity, Inclusion, Anti-racism, and Social Justice
ESH06. Practicing Together: Navigating Conversations About Anti-Racism with Students and Adults Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Educators, school administrators, and parents engaged in social justice conversations with young people, join us for a social justice toolkit, an experience through film, and the invaluable wisdom that comes through the experiential practice of vulnerability in difficult conversations. As author Brené Brown reflects, we must be brave, awkward, and kind. Take this opportunity to be brave, awkward, kind, and more. Gain new insights into talking about race with children and adults, strategies to use in any challenging conversation, and an electronic publication with resources to use back at school.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Carol Swanson, San Francisco Schoolhouse (CA); Jen Cort, Jen Cort Consulting
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
ESF15. Facilitating Affinity Groups and Navigating Other Difficult Conversations About Racism and Oppression (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: In our current social climate, people are increasingly responsible for facilitating uncomfortable conversations to challenge white supremacy and oppression and promote understanding, respect, and connection. This interactive seminar is for people engaged in formally or informally facilitating social justice interactions, affinity groups, and other difficult conversations. Together we will build our comfort in clearly defining, explaining, and discussing the construction of oppression to individuals at varying levels of experience. Participants will learn how to hold courageous conversations and establish safe(r) spaces to enable groups to lean into discomfort; practice facilitation tools and methodologies for leading effective 1:1, large, and small intergroup conversation in a variety of scenarios; and learn how to effectively address disengagement, arguments, and divisiveness. We will also examine our own identities and identity-based socialization and how they impact our interactions, as well as how we are impacted personally.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Natalie J. Thoreson, inVision Consulting
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
ESF16. Building Safe, Brave, and Affirming Schools for LGBTQ Youth of Color (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 29,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Schools are often unsafe, hostile environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning students, teachers, and families. Painful legacies of discrimination, harassment, ridicule, and assault haunt the promise of safety for LGBTQ people within school communities, especially LGBTQ youth, which translates to poor student achievement, poor health outcomes, and a decreased sense of belonging. Schools are purposefully missing opportunities to celebrate the liberation, bravery, and beauty found within the LGBTQ community, and starving youth of key lessons about how gender and sexuality shape our perception of ourselves and society. The conversation about safe and welcoming schools for LGBTQ youth has shifted particularly in the past 5-10 years, with a focus on transgender and gender nonconforming youth. Teachers and school leaders rarely have the knowledge, tools, institutional support, or willingness to address these issues. Participants will deep-dive into the needs and experiences of LGBTQ students, with a focus on LGBTQ youth. Attendees will take away new information, skills, and practices to better prepare them to implement data-driven and youth-led strategies for safe, brave, and affirming schools.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 29, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Jabari Lyles, Jabari Lyles Consulting (MD)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
The Leadership Institute for People of Color (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Gain powerful strategies to advance to the next level of leadership while building your network of fellow leaders, mentors, and sponsors in this unique seminar tailored for BIPOC educators. The Leadership Institute for People of Color offers state-of-the-art leadership development tools, strategies, and resources including understanding how cognitive preferences influence leadership through The Herrmann Brain Dominance Instrument (HBDI) Inventory. The institute format includes in-the-moment coaching, peer exchange, and post-institute follow-up, all in an encouraging atmosphere designed to nurture and propel a compelling vision for fulfilling your career goals. Participants gain an inside view into critical moves for long-term professional and personal growth and success. Through facilitated dialogue with top leaders of color, participants access wisdom to help tackle issues including working effectively with mentors and sponsors, evaluating your advocate in the search process, and critical skills leaders wish they had before assuming their positions. Attend this institute to build a cohort of colleagues, mentors, champions and sponsors to walk alongside you in your leadership journey.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Leadership Institute
  • Presenters: Nicole A. DuFauchard, The Advent School (MA); James Calleroz White, The Galloway School (GA); Felicia McCrary, The Galloway School (GA)
The Leadership Institute for People of Color
ESF01. Auditing DEI: So Much More Than a Survey (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: “DEI work is never done.” True, but we should still be accountable for progress. How is DEI going at your school? How do you know? Maybe you administer a survey, collect some demographic information, and even have an inclusion dashboard. Explore how to connect those individual elements of assessment within a rigorous, robust, and impactful DEI auditing framework. Join us to deepen your understanding of DEI auditing—what it is, why it’s vital, and how to design an audit that demonstrates diversity, equity, and inclusion. Workshop fundamental audit questions about what your priorities are and how can you objectively assess “inclusion” and “belonging.” Learn to situate auditing within an ongoing, formative, strategic-growth process and take stock of your institution’s auditing foundation and growth edges.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Alison Park, Blink Consulting; Stacey Kertsman, Blink Consulting
Data Use in Activism: Evidence-based Equity Practice, Research and Evaluation
ESF02. The Art of Giving and Receiving the Gift of Racial Feedback: Building Joyful Cross-Racial Allyship (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: How can direct racial feedback lead to meaningful cross-racial collaboration and programmatic change? While we understand that moving through racial ruptures to genuine repair nurtures interpersonal connection, individual transformation, and institutional equity, we lack stories, models, and strategies for giving and receiving racial feedback, developing robust cross-racial allyship, and fostering true equity and inclusion. We first crossed paths at the 2019 CATDC Women + Leadership Conference, in the midst of a public racial miscue. Join this interactive workshop to share the concrete, actionable strategies that allowed us (a Black woman offering racial feedback and white woman receiving it) to move through a fraught moment to enduring cross-racial collaboration and programmatic change. Bring your thoughts, hopes, wishes, and worries. Get time for discussion and application.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Nikkia Young, Head-Royce School (CA); Lisa Haney, California Teacher Development Collaborative
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
ESF04. Cultural Value Leadership: A Leadership Model for DEI (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Join us to learn about cultural value leadership (CVL), a researched-based leadership model. This recently published leadership style provides measurable ways to evaluate the cultural value in a situation, activity, or an individual’s participation. In CVL, culture is considered the intellectual capital in the application of culture philanthropy leadership strategies for individuals, entrepreneurs, influencers, public organizations, educational institutions, and corporations (Herrera, 2021). The advantage of CVL over traditional leadership models (transactional, servant, transformational, etc.) is the opportunity for leaders to make an impact through positive cultural conduct in situations or in the lives of others, through shared ethical values. We will officially unveil resources from the Cultural Value Institute during this seminar.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Veronica Herrera, The McCallie School (TN)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
ESF05. Do You See What I Mean? Facilitating Courageous Conversations Visually (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: As educators and activists leading the work around diversity, equity, and inclusion in our schools, we are often called on to facilitate courageous conversations across identity, power, and difference. Though there are many dialogue models and tools, visuals can help set the stage, support thinking, and catalyze breakthroughs. Engage with veteran facilitators to learn common facilitation models, avoid pitfalls, and manage polarity. Learn visual facilitation from experts to help people see issues and perspectives more clearly. Join us for an opportunity to unpack practical strategies on facilitating courageous conversations, practice facilitating, and leave with a visual toolset to deepen your practice.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Kawai Lai, Kawai Lai Persons; Tamisha Williams, Tamisha Williams Consulting, LLC
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
ESF06. Educational Justice for Black Girls: A Call for Radical, Transformational Pedagogy (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: All Black girls are beautiful and brilliant, representing diverse cultural backgrounds and social identities. As brilliant and gifted as Black girls are, we know they are not thriving to their full potential in K–12 schools as a result of oppressive systemic and institutional barriers. Our guiding text, Teaching Beautiful, Brilliant Black Girls, calls for a radical, transformational pedagogy that centers the lived experiences of all Black girls. It is time for the American education system to do right by—and with—Black girls, by providing them equitable access to a Pan-African, culturally engaging, relevant, and responsive education. Join us to explore critical strategies for transforming your classroom to create spaces where Black girls thrive!
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Shemariah Arki, The Kent State University Press; Omobolade Delano-Oriaran, St Norbert College; Marguerite Pennick, University of Wisconsin; Orinthia Swindell, Live Oak School (CA); Eddie Moore, Jr., The Privilege Institute
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
ESF07. From Trauma to Fatigue to Reintegration (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: What is culturally responsive teaching and why does it matter even more following the death of George Floyd? What is Black and white fatigue and how does it show up in our schools? We know that all educators, regardless of race, need to hold their students to high academic and behavior expectations, while building trust and rapport with them. This requires teachers to be aware of Black fatigue and how it surfaces in their students. Teachers must do the “inside-out” work, “developing the right mindset, engaging in self-reflection, checking for implicit biases, and practicing social-emotional awareness.” In other words, to move toward just intent, we, as educators, have to reach our students, understand the fatigue, and examine its impact.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Roslyn Benjamin, The Children's School (GA); Paula Farmer, The Berkeley School (CA); Yvonne Hendricks, Live oak School (CA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
ESF08. Leading Culture Change in Schools: Belonging, Equity, Inclusion, and Beyond (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Inequity is a deeply rooted and structured system, historically seeded and locally and globally cultivated. Yet when we engage in equity, inclusion, and belonging change work in our schools, we tend to approach the problem as an interpersonal issue rather than a cultural and systems one. In order to tend to the work of culture shifting for school change, join us to learn ways of thinking about and approaching culture change. While the strategies and tools you engage with here are transferable to all kinds of change-making work, we will focus on equity, inclusion, and belonging.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Rebecca Stilwell, Columbia University Teachers College; Nicole Furlonge, Columbia University Teachers College
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
ESF09. Master Class in Place-Based Education: A Context for Indigenous People in All Learning and Every School (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Current social tensions felt in the U.S. are playing out on Indigenous lands. We can learn lessons from Indigenous people on how to leverage place, land, and community to build inclusive, anti-bias education—yet the voices of Indigenous people play all too small a part in building a just and equitable world. Join us to examine Makawalu, a native Hawaiian term that embodies the concept of multiple perspectives, to unpack the principles of place-based learning and design a unit for your students or school. Participants will: (1) Learn about Makawalu, leveraging this native Hawaiian philosophy to understand place-based learning, (2) Learn about the 10 principles of place-based learning, and (3) Apply the 10 principles to build a place-based unit.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Kapono Ciotti, Wai'alae Elementary Public Charter School (HI)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
ESF10. ProEquity: A "Perspectives Consciousness" and Civics-Based Approach to Antiracist Education (For Seventh-12th Grade Social Studies Educators) (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: The ProEquity approach uses Hess and McAvoy’s “empirical vs. policy” framework to distinguish empirical questions such as “Does structural racism exist?” from policy questions such as “What should government do about structural racism?” (e.g., affirmative action). Treating structural racism as fact precludes racist comments that blame racial disparities on African Americans rather than on structural racism and allows educators to safely welcome conservative viewpoints. ProEquity uses “perspectives consciousness” strategies to increase psychological flexibility and foster a shared identity as a “we” society. It also uses “value tensions” to frame ideological policy positions as different prioritizations of values on a continuum rather than as “right or wrong.” This fosters political tolerance and encourages a “critical yet empowered” view of racism.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Ayo Heinegg Magwood, Uprooting Inequity LLC; Brigid Moriarty-Guerrero, Longview Education
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, and Activism
ESF11. SKY Breathwork and SEL for Educators (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: SKY Breathing Meditation offers tools to heal the pains, trauma, and stress of systemic racism and oppressive systems by bringing together people of color and allies in a space of healing and self-care. The cornerstone of this interactive, reflective workshop is the SKY Breathing practice, which utilizes specific rhythms of the breath to quickly and easily eliminate stress, revitalize the nervous system, and bring greater clarity and focus to the mind. It does this by taking advantage of the natural connection that already exists among the body, the breath, and the mind. Designed for educators, this seminar equips teachers, administrators, and youth advocates with evidence-based tools to manage your own stress and emotions, providing deep healing and transforming school cultures—allowing students to thrive.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Susan Ramsundarsingh, SKY Schools(Toronto, CA), SKY Schools, Ambrose Wilson-Brown, SKY Schools(WI), Deirdre Jackson, SKY School (CA), Elan Gepner-Dales, SKY Schools(GA)
ESF12. Systemic Racial Equity, Not Rhetoric: Strategies for—and Real Consequences of—Hiring with Cultural Competence (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: The goal of this seminar is for leaders to decide whether they are ready to restructure hiring processes in ways that actually build anti-racist equity and strengthen a climate to retain and reward those working for social justice within the school community. In a world shaped by COVID-19 and the continued sanctioned murder of people of color, this work is urgent. Any façade of “diversity” rhetoric must give way to effective systemic change for racial equity; to do otherwise is to reinforce a racist climate. Join us for opportunities to identify practices for attracting, hiring, and supporting the best culturally competent candidates for all positions, reminding members of the school community that racial equity is both an ongoing institutional imperative and a collective responsibility.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Cris Cullinan, Eugene; Amani Reed, The School at Columbia University (NY); Kalyan Balaven, The Dunn School (CA); Emma Coddington, Willamette University; Ruth Jurgensen, Prep for Prep
Leadership & Management for Equity, Inclusion, Anti-racism, and Social Justice
ESF13. Taking AIM to the Next Level: What to Do with Your AIM Survey Results (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Taking the step to engage your school community with the NAIS Assessment for Inclusivity and Multiculturalism (AIM) Survey provides schools with rich and robust data. Organizing and processing qualitative and quantitative data can be overwhelming, yet it is an important step in understanding survey results on your school’s climate, providing transparency within your community, and setting focused goals with tangible outcomes. After designing this process and ironing out the wrinkles along the way, our team is ready to share the details of our journey to help guide and support those looking to launch the AIM survey or coordinate next steps after receiving results.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Jennifer Turner, La Jolla Country Day School (CA); Marsha Poh, La Jolla Country Day School (CA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
ESF14. They Said What They Said! Leveraging BIPOC Student Voice to Enhance DEIJ Work in Schools (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Developing student leaders is essential to the mission of all schools. Yet, when Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) students demonstrate leadership skills by advocating for what they need, schools often do not listen. Join us to reflect on what it means to love, empower, and be accountable to BIPOC students by centering their needs and critically examining the extent to which the institution fulfills its mission for them. Using youth-led social movements as a model, discuss how institutions can respond to students’ experiences and work with students to co-create equitable school cultures and just learning communities moving forward.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Kalea Selmon, The Wells Collective; Shari Berga, The Wells Collective; Akailah Jenkins McItyre, The Wells Collective; Jennifer Moore, The Wells Collective; Talia Busby Titus, The Wells Collective
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
ESH07. From Inquiry to Action: Using Middle School Life Science to Counter and Transform Racist Thinking Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Get (re)introduced to the five dimensions of multicultural education from the work of Dr. James Banks. Using the model of a traditional middle school science curriculum, learn how these dimensions can transform students’ learning experiences by strengthening their capacity to develop discipline-specific and cross-cutting skills that result in social action. Explore and apply a powerful assessment and planning tool to more effectively “help students identify, examine, and clarify their values; consider value alternatives; and make reflective value choices they can defend within a society in which human dignity is a shared value.” Begin to transform your existing units and leave with ready-to-use materials. Please bring your current units and a laptop.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Angela Flynn, The Gordon School (RI)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
ESH08. Ideas to Action! Strategic Planning for DEIJ Work Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Goal setting and strategic planning are the keys to effective equity and justice work. Unless intentional planning time is set aside, many schools find it challenging to balance the time demands of programming, student support, and long-term institutional equity goals within the hustle of the academic year. Join this highly interactive workshop for equity and justice leaders who want to galvanize their teams to move from talk to action. Take advantage of the time away from school to focus on planning and strategy. Leave the workshop with a vision statement, prioritized strategic goals, and ideas for how to best communicate with various stakeholders.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Stephanie Bramlett, Phillips Exeter Academy (NH)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
ESH09. Our Liberation Is Connected: Moving Beyond Intent to Strategize for Action Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Schools have radically changed to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, but have we responded to the racial pandemic that continues to terrorize communities of color? When our liberties are under assault, our sense of safety is jeopardized, and we are reckoning with the impacts of poly-pandemics, it becomes difficult to work collectively toward social justice. Changing institutions requires more than individual reflection and just intent. Uniting communities of color against white supremacy in the pursuit of racial justice can begin by dismantling anti-Black, anti-immigrant, and anti-Asian ideologies. Join us to get the tools to catalyze individual growth into organizational shifts. Utilize organizational change frameworks to build solidarity across communities of color and leverage our power to effect radical institutional change.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Rochelle Reodica, Marin Horizon School (CA); Tinia Merriweather, Ethical Culture Fieldston School (NY); Jacqueline Kurzer, Cathedral School for Boys (CA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
ESH10. Systems Thinking for Community Health and Well-Being: Visualizing Complexity and Consequences of Actions Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Community health and well-being in our schools is a multifaceted topic. With so many variables impacting the students and adults in our care, it's overwhelming to know which levers to pull to create lasting, sustainable, and positive change in this area. NAIS and Cauzality have partnered to bring a systems-thinking approach and easy-to-use software platform to schools to visualize the interdependencies among these variables and build conceptual understanding of causal feedback loops within a school's ecosystem. Join us for a highly interactive and school-specific session. Use the Cauzality systems mapping software to draw connections between the forces acting on your school's community health and well-being and identify the most promising leverage points to take action for the future.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Jacqueline Wolking, NAIS; Jeff Hell, Cauzality; Darylle Smoot, NAIS; Antonio Hernandez, NAIS
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
ESH11. What Are Anti-Racist Schools? Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Police brutality during the COVID-19 lockdown caused civil unrest that engulfed the country. Many school leaders quickly mandated anti-racism training but not the social capital and personal work needed to breathe life into anti-racist practices. It is never too late to begin again. Join us for the opportunity to re-center our personal and collective journey toward anti-racist education. Together we will reimagine anti-racism by interrogating our own social identities in the school system, learning about the role of restorative practices and social and emotional learning in anti-racist work, analyzing brave spaces as a framework for community building, and developing a plan of action for supporting community transformation using social problem-solving. Leave ready to build bridges and imagine the possibilities for your learning communities.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Tawanna Jones Morrison, we REIGN Inc
Leadership & Management for Equity, Inclusion, Anti-racism, and Social Justice
ESF15. Facilitating Affinity Groups and Navigating Other Difficult Conversations About Racism and Oppression (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: In our current social climate, people are increasingly responsible for facilitating uncomfortable conversations to challenge white supremacy and oppression and promote understanding, respect, and connection. This interactive seminar is for people engaged in formally or informally facilitating social justice interactions, affinity groups, and other difficult conversations. Together we will build our comfort in clearly defining, explaining, and discussing the construction of oppression to individuals at varying levels of experience. Participants will learn how to hold courageous conversations and establish safe(r) spaces to enable groups to lean into discomfort; practice facilitation tools and methodologies for leading effective 1:1, large, and small intergroup conversation in a variety of scenarios; and learn how to effectively address disengagement, arguments, and divisiveness. We will also examine our own identities and identity-based socialization and how they impact our interactions, as well as how we are impacted personally.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Natalie J. Thoreson, inVision Consulting
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
ESF16. Building Safe, Brave, and Affirming Schools for LGBTQ Youth of Color (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, November 30,
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Schools are often unsafe, hostile environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning students, teachers, and families. Painful legacies of discrimination, harassment, ridicule, and assault haunt the promise of safety for LGBTQ people within school communities, especially LGBTQ youth, which translates to poor student achievement, poor health outcomes, and a decreased sense of belonging. Schools are purposefully missing opportunities to celebrate the liberation, bravery, and beauty found within the LGBTQ community, and starving youth of key lessons about how gender and sexuality shape our perception of ourselves and society. The conversation about safe and welcoming schools for LGBTQ youth has shifted particularly in the past 5-10 years, with a focus on transgender and gender nonconforming youth. Teachers and school leaders rarely have the knowledge, tools, institutional support, or willingness to address these issues. Participants will deep-dive into the needs and experiences of LGBTQ students, with a focus on LGBTQ youth. Attendees will take away new information, skills, and practices to better prepare them to implement data-driven and youth-led strategies for safe, brave, and affirming schools.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, November 30, 12:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full Day Seminar
  • Presenters: Jabari Lyles, Jabari Lyles Consulting (MD)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Expanding Our Radical Imaginations: Teaching Afrofuturism in the Classroom A Wednesday, December 1,
11:30 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Much has been said about the need to teach not only stories of sorrow and struggle but also of joy and resilience. Black artists have reimagined the past while envisioning a more just future for over a century. Explore this long history and gain strategies for incorporating Afrofuturism into your curriculum. Examine how the Afrofuturist framework helps us understand the legacies of colonialism and slavery and Black liberation movements, while celebrating Black joy and future envisioning. We believe teaching Afrofuturism gives students an opportunity to exercise their radical imaginations and study texts about the Black experience that extend beyond slavery. Learn how doing so can be transformative for all students, enabling them to envision the world we want to create.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 1, 11:30 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Alegria Barclay and Matthew Oakland, The Nueva School (CA)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, and Activism
PAN: A Safe Space for Liberated Healing and Storytelling A Wednesday, December 1,
11:30 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Contemplate and discuss the power of storytelling to inform practices that impact both BIPOC and white independent school students and alumni. Considering the significance of student identity formation, the intersections of racial identity, and social change through social movements and resistance, explore how institutions can best serve their BIPOC students through targeted engagement and the facilitation of meaningful mentorships with BIPOC alumni.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 1, 11:30 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Shannon Laribo-McGuinn and Tiffany Dayemo, PQV Action Network (PAN)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
Partnerships with Parents for a Stronger Community A Wednesday, December 1,
11:30 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: As many schools face a reckoning with the exclusionary experience of their students of color, we see examples of families pushing back against their communities' efforts to become more equitable and inclusive schools. Learn our strategies for partnering with our families to strengthen the community. Explore our strategic plan and the role of our parents in building awareness and creating opportunities for growth in our community. Hear leaders of our Parents and Guardians Association share their projects, contributions, and partnerships with different groups to involve families as we progress in our DEI efforts. Get concrete, tangible steps you can take to open dialogue, deepen learning, and build relationships with families.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 1, 11:30 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Debbie Bensadon and Winston Yeung, Lakeside School (WA); April Paris-Joseph, Parents and Guardians Association of Lakeside School (WA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Assessing the Academic and Social Experience of Black Boys A Wednesday, December 1,
11:30 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Examine the adjustment of Black boy students at the Gordon School in Providence, RI. Keith Hinderlie used a unique and engaging approach to assess students that yielded valuable data. Gordon School combined this information with survey data to develop a comprehensive understanding of the Black boy experiences at the school. Assistant Head of School Lynn Bowman led a task force to examine the experience of Black boys at Gordon. The assessment and recommendations led to more in-depth examination that ultimately yielded actionable steps and accountability measures to ensure continued support and success for the boys, faculty, and parent community. The results of this approach will guide future professional development along with practice and program adjustments.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 1, 11:30 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Keith Hinderlie, Hinderlie and Associates; Lynn Bowman, Lynn Bowman Executive Leadership Coaching and Consulting, LLC
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
What—Still No Diversity Director at Your PWI?! Advancing Collaborative Teacher Leadership as an Alternative A Wednesday, December 1,
11:30 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: At a small progressive PS-12 school lacking a diversity director and a Social Justice Committee for more than a year, we, a growing cadre of BIPOC and allied educators together, are strategically collaborating to reconcile harms created by ill-informed narratives generated by adults denying acknowledgement of student and teacher voices at our predominantly white institution (PW. Discuss how we have progressed together as critical colleagues and teacher leaders, employing alternative solutions not only to support each other, our students, staff, and parents but also to effect change in an institution that is trying—but has yet to create an equitable, inclusive, and just culture. The theme that permeates and drives our work: Why should a student of color attend our school?
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 1, 11:30 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Susan Hendricks, Bennel Thompkins, Leo Glaze, Paul Nam, and Grace Hess-Quimbita, The Waverly School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
Progressive Discipline: Centering Humanity in Racialized Conflicts A Wednesday, December 1,
11:30 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: As we face the 2021-2022 school year, adolescents are under increased stress as a result of the double pandemic of repeated, racialized violence and COVID-19. In normal circumstances, we would expect middle-school-aged students to make mistakes as they test out different ways of being in the world. In this current context, however, mistakes around race and identity can have even more dire consequences. Focus on using the lens of restorative practices to give middle school children the language to talk about conflicts rooted in identity. Begin with a framework of restorative practices, then examine case studies showing how to us these tools to address middle school conflicts involving race, gender, sexuality, and other aspects of identity.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 1, 11:30 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Saara Mahjouri, Bank Street School for Children (NY); Coy Dailey, The Brearley School (NY); Javaid Khan, Horace Mann School (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
It's Cultural Authenticity for Me! How TikTok Provides the Blueprint for Modeling Cultural Authenticity A Wednesday, December 1,
11:30 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: As educators of color, how can we model and teach cultural authenticity in predominantly white spaces for our BIPOC students? Join us to define cultural authenticity for yourself and unpack different ways you can promote cultural authenticity with your students. Use the popular app TikTok as an example to create a framework and blueprint for the ways we can teach both our students and ourselves to be culturally authentic in the white institutions that we attend and work within, in an authentic and unapologetic manner. Ultimately, create a tool kit to transform your own practice and advise students of color on how to unapologetically express their own intersectional identities in authentic ways within institutions.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 1, 11:30 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Ayesha Numan, Head-Royce School (CA); Rashaad Phillips, Lab School of Washington (DC)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Dismantling White Supremacy in Fundraising (This Is Going to Take More Than an Hour.) A Wednesday, December 1,
11:30 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Like everything else our schools do, fundraising is an opportunity and responsibility for DEI. Examine how the culture and practices of fundraising perpetuate white supremacy and how we can begin to dismantle “the way we do.” Explore ways to interrupt white supremacy in fundraising now: using DEI commitments to change the old “pay to play” expectations; rejecting racist assumptions about generosity; and empowering giving in your approach to asking. In addition to “try tomorrow tools” (Pollock), identify what requires strategy and sustained effort. Ultimately, we need to review and redesign our systems and culture of philanthropy, including what’s working well. We aren’t going to rebuild advancement in an hour, but we can make progress.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 1, 11:30 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Alison Park, Blink Consulting; Tesha Poe, Joy-Raising
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
White-Presenting People of Color A Wednesday, December 1,
11:30 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Being a white-presenting person of color is a complicated and nuanced experience. What experiences are common among white-presenting people of color? How do white-presenting people of color grapple with white skin privileges and honor their experience as people of color? Join our thought-provoking conversation where individuals who identify with, teach, or are the parents of white-presenting POC can gain insight and awareness about these experiences and deepen our understanding of the complexity of racial identity as a result.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 1, 11:30 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Sara “Momii” Roberts, Little Red School House and Elisabeth Irwin High School (NY); Lizette Ortega Dolan, JUST Dragonfly
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Journeys of Belonging: Empowering Educators Through Identity-Based Reflections A Wednesday, December 1,
11:30 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Explore your self-identity by practicing deep listening and sharing personal narratives. Engage with case studies from Courageous Dialogue with Chinese Educators (CDCE) through small-group discussion to find commonalities, shared experiences, and realistic solutions to combat microaggression and racism in the workplace. Learn to advocate for yourself, students and your community leveraging activism in various forms (curriculum, cross-content collaboration, affinity space within school community, community-based groups, nonprofits, and grassroots organizations).
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 1, 11:30 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Bonnie Wang, Durham Academy (NC); Vicky Wang, The St. Paul’s Schools (MD)
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Blessing in the Storm: Three African American Women Heads Share Reckonings Learned from the Pandemic A Wednesday, December 1,
11:30 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: At the 2016 NAIS People of Color Conference, we shared our stories as candidates in the head search process as women of color, juxtaposing research on the search process for women and people of color with our personal experiences. Now heads of school who have led through dual pandemics of COVID-19 and racial violence, seeing increased attrition of heads of school, we discuss the impact of increased openings on future leaders of color, share realities as women heads of color, and combine the most recent research on headship for women and people of color with advice for navigating the current landscape with intent and accountability. Join us for tips for activating change in your life and the landscape of headship.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 1, 11:30 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Donna Lindner, Lowell School (DC); Brenda Crawley, Plymouth Meeting Friends School (PA); Kim Ridley, Fayerweather Street School (MA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit, and Soul
“You Don’t Live There:” Strategies for Educators of Color to Set and Maintain Healthy Boundaries A Wednesday, December 1,
11:30 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Toni Morrison recalls her father's advice about her first job: “Listen. You don’t live there. You live here. With your people. Go to work. Get your money. And come on home.” Many educators of color struggle to set clear and consistent boundaries with their personal and school life. Beyond the 24/7 nature of school life, educators of color may be held to higher standards than our white peers, our jobs are more precarious, and we may be burdened with additional, often uncompensated, roles. In addition, we tend to hold ourselves to high standards of excellence, which adds to the mounting and ultimately unmanageable pressure. Join us to learn how to set and maintain boundaries to protect and prioritize your mental and emotional health.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 1, 11:30 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Jessy Molina, Molina Consulting
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit, and Soul
How Our Grading Undermines Equity and What We Can Do About It B Wednesday, December 1,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: Despite our deepest commitment to equity and anti-racist teaching, many of our current grading practices are artifacts of the Industrial Revolution and actually undermine teaching and perpetuate disparities. Analyze current grading practices and see how they support racist beliefs. Then get a sampling of more accurate, bias-resistant, and motivational grading practices. Integrate research, stories, and history as you seize the opportunity to engage with colleagues and ask questions of the presenters. Deepen your understanding, commitment, and confidence to make grading more equitable in your classroom and school.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 1, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Mark Boswell and Joe Feldman, Crescendo Education Group
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Traversing the Long and Thorny Road Toward Equity in Our Schools B Wednesday, December 1,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: Join us to use the metaphor of a journey to examine the nuanced and complex work toward racial equity in independent schools. Explore detours and pitfalls that commonly derail our intentions for racial equity and justice and gain strategies to address them. Case studies, reflection, and a hands-on activity will fill your "backpack" with the essential tools to traverse this long and thorny road. Leave knowing how to recognize, label, and counteract the detours that lead us astray on the path to equity. Focus on self-care and the lifting of others as essential tools for the journey to our collective liberation.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 1, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Mahtab Mahmoodzadeh, The Overlake School (WA); Danae Howe, Seattle Academy (WA); Mollie Page, Eastside Catholic School (WA)
Leadership & Management for Equity, Inclusion, Anti-racism, and Social Justice
The Dangerous Meaning of Gratitude and Silence of Under-Resourced Families and Students B Wednesday, December 1,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: Join us to address the dangerous power that independent schools have to purposefully or unintentionally demand gratitude and/or silence from their under-resourced students and families. The draw of the scholarship can be a shiny trap and allows PWI to start the relationship with supremacy and paternalism. Institutions, students, and families must change our minds to realize the student is the gift, not the institution. Discuss encouraging advocacy and confidence in under-resourced families to make sure our institutions are doing right by those families and helping them thrive rather than just survive.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 1, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Jackee Bruno, Pinewood School (CA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Colorism in the Latine Community B Wednesday, December 1,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: Colorism is a term commonly used among people of color, but what does this look like in the Latine community? Discuss different instances of colorism from varying Latine lenses. Explore your own experiences, review case studies, and walk away with strategies and language for addressing colorism when you witness it. By changing the narrative in your personal life and in your school, you can spread awareness and create a more equitable and inclusive environment for both educators and students.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 1, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Gabmara Alvarez-Spychalski, The Baldwin School (PA); Kerry Kettering-Goens, The Haverford School (PA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
The Vessel of Activism Within Science Education B Wednesday, December 1,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: See how disciplines such as science and STEAM can integrate racial and social justice activism into the curriculum and discuss how to include this activism in the science classroom for elementary-aged students. Science education typically leads young people to discoveries through observations, inferences, hypotheses, and communication skills. While scientific skills spark curiosity, the focus on such can also limit student awareness regarding racial and social justice activism in science. Learn how to incorporate the notion of change-makers in science and discuss how to implement curriculum with the lens of windows and mirrors within multiple disciplines. Examine a variety of frameworks.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 1, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Lisa McDonald and Mary Ellen Reinhard, Avenues: The World School (NY)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, and Activism
"You Can't Do It Alone:” Building Equity Teams for Sustainable Change B Wednesday, December 1,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: In the wake of constant racial crises, schools are increasingly turning to DEI directors to take the lead. Often this lone person of color is seen as both the face of diversity and the person responsible for responding to each event. Dismantling racism and other oppressions in schools needs to be the work of every person. Schools that establish robust equity teams provide ongoing opportunities for all members of the community to learn, grow, and provide their perspective. Examine how equity teams form, the opportunities that exist for assessing your current practices and structures, and the use of equity improvement cycles and equity instructional rounds as part of your institutional practice that can drive sustainable change.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 1, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Mary Antón, Learning, Leading, Becoming Equity Leadership Consulting; Tamisha Williams, Tamisha Williams Consulting, LLC
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
Serving the Intersection of Being BIPOC with a Learning Difference: One’s School Journey B Wednesday, December 1,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: In conversations about the intersection of race and school, one’s racial identity provides privileges or creates barriers to academic success and sense of belonging. Although an important conversation, for students living with a learning difference (LD) this does not capture all of their identities. At Delaware Valley Friends School, we recognize the importance of using the intersectional lens of race and learning differences throughout our school, starting with the admissions process. Explore data and best practices for serving BIPOC students who live with an LD, share our school’s journey and lessons learned in developing our intersectional lens, and engage in a conversation with other independent schools about what it looks like to holistically support BIPOC students with LDs.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 1, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Ryan Harrison and Mary Ellen Trent, Delaware Valley Friends School (PA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
Disrupt and Design: Online Learning Strategies for Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging B Wednesday, December 1,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: Designing and utilizing online spaces will continue to be an essential part of schools going forward. How might we design and utilize online spaces to deepen our equity work and better support our students? Online learning presents unique opportunities that should not replicate the systems and structures of our brick-and-mortar schools. Hear from members of the Global Online Academy team as they focus on some core principles and strategies for online learning that can support inclusion, belonging, and equitable learning experiences in any environment. Get examples of how these principles have been applied within our programs as well as concrete steps to translate and transfer these principles to your own specific context.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 1, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Deepjyot Sidhu, Global Online Academy (NC); Eric Hudson, Global Online Academy (MA); Amanda Burch, Global Online Academy (CO); Sara Tahir, Global Online Academy (TX); Ellen Min Hartman, Global Online Academy (PA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
What Do You Need to Say? Collaborating with High School Leaders of Color B Wednesday, December 1,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: How can student-facing administrators, faculty members, and affinity group advisors help students of color find, speak, and act on their truths? At the Urban School of San Francisco, this effort is most visible within the Multiculti Leadership Team, a group of 45+ students partnering with adults on school-wide inclusion initiatives. Join a dean of equity and inclusion and two recent graduates involved in Multiculti as they draw on oral history and personal experience as women of color and discuss the strengths and tensions of sharing power and effort between students and adults of color. Learn about this unique program, reflect on the nuances of student-adult collaboration, and leave with a template for examining your personal and institutional practices. Attend with a team if possible.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 1, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Aku Ammah-Tagoe, The Urban School of San Francisco (CA); Cassie Eng, Princeton University student (NJ); Mikayla Woods, Occidental College student (CA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Reimagining School: BIPOC School Founder Panel B Wednesday, December 1,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: People of color often say that independent schools weren’t made for us. What if they were? What does it look like to reimagine a school from the beginning? What have you already dreamed education could look like? Come hear about the experiences of educators of color who founded independent schools that primarily serve students of color. We represent different school models and stages in school founding. Each founder will speak about their school and its journey, then answer questions from the audience in a panel format.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 1, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Susan Yao, Friends Academy (MA); Tiffany Blessingame, Ferguson School (GA); Sanidia Oliver-Stone, Morgan Oliver School (GA); Chanel Malik and Danean Harris, Feed the Soul (DC)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
The Precarity of Asian Americanness: Overcoming Whiteness and Asian Pacific American Identity B Wednesday, December 1,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: Beginning with the origins of the term “Yellow Peril,” this presentation argues that anti-Asian racism is a structural element of American society ebbing and flowing throughout our history. Historical spotlights include the vilification of Japanese/Japanese-Americans during WWII, the postwar acclimation of Asian Pacific Americans (APA) (i.e., myth of the model minority), the resuscitation of Japan bashing in the 1980s leading to Chinese-American Vincent Chin’s murder, culminating in our all too contemporary and numerous manifestations of anti-Asian hate. The second half of the workshop is more exploratory, focusing on recent scholarship that shifts the production of APA identity from the standard of whiteness (e.g., model minority or perpetual foreigner). An APA identity decentering whiteness is formed in relation and dialogue with another otherness: namely Blackness.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 1, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Paul Nam, The Waverly School (CA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Who Are My Sister’s Keepers? Advocacy, Activism, and Organizing Using a Black Girls' Lens B Wednesday, December 1,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: Black girls are often overlooked in social justice movements and discussions about sexism, racism, and classism. Siloed community discourse and limited policy development maintain gender-based disparities that impact the lives of Black girls. Lack of political and civic education in schools keeps them disconnected from the political process and decision-making tables. Engage in deep discussion about how to confront systemic oppression and white supremacy in culturally responsive ways. Explore popular education for supporting Black girls in developing leadership, advocacy, activism, and organizing skills. Leave with a framework that will assist you in becoming the accomplice Black girls need.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 1, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Tawanna Jones, we REIGN Inc.
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Letters to a New DEI Practitioner B Wednesday, December 1,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: Beginning with an honest look back, we share our skill set, lived experience, and level of cultural competency when we began our roles as diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) directors. Hear us reflect on what we didn't know at that time, how mentors helped us grow and stretch professionally, and the importance of building a support network. Get timely, insightful, and inspiring advice about experiences as DEI practitioners. Discuss and reflect on your own experiences. Ultimately, we seek to inspire colleagues to consider the field, share how to sustain the work, discuss prioritizing self-care, and understand the importance of recognizing the pitfalls, detours, and accidents that are part of a DEI practitioner's journey.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 1, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Zara-Marie Spooner, Pingree School (MA); Walidah Justice, Kent Place School (NJ)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit, and Soul
Creating Listening Hives for Equitable and Inclusive Schools B Wednesday, December 1,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: Imagine having space, time, and an effective approach to use in school to connect with others in a sustainable, generative way to learn about each other’s interests, hopes, and fears, and to uncover new possibilities for equitable and inclusive teaching, learning, and flourishing? Focus on ways to create change, one listening opportunity at a time. Learn about and practice listening in listening hives: small professional learning pods that build listening capacity toward more inclusive school cultures and communities. Practice protocols that allow you to create listening hives in your own school that can help pollinate equity, inclusion, and belonging for all people in your community.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 1, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Nicole Furlonge, Klingenstein Center, Teachers College Columbia University
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
The Multiracial Student Identity Experience at Independent Schools B Wednesday, December 1,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: Multiracial students (or those with two or more racial identities) will only become an increasing population of students of color in our schools in the future. It is essential for independent school leaders to understand this historically "othered" population in our communities and how to support them academically, socially, and personally. Come to this session to learn about Sophie Howard's graduate research looking at multiracial high-school student identity experience at predominantly white and progressive independent schools and come away with knowledge about how to support these students through their careers at your school.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 1, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Sophie Howard, Maret School (DC)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
From Pawns to Controlling the Board: Seeing BIPOC Students as Power Players in Student Programming C Wednesday, December 1,
2:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: BIPOC students in independent schools are often treated like pawns on a chess board moved around to support the diversity strategy of the school without having their voices heard or needs met. Centering BIPOC students, Maryvale Preparatory School, a Catholic independent school located near Baltimore, designed a series of programs providing space for BIPOC students to show up authentically and established community. As a result, we have seen a decrease in BIPOC student apathy and a willingness from them to partner with the school to further the DEI work. Learn about student programs started at Maryvale, get strategies to deal with push back from the opposition, and brainstorm programming you can adopt to fit your school culture.
  • Block: C (Wednesday, December 1, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Victor Shin and Kalea Selmon, Maryvale Preparatory School (MD)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Doing the Work Without Burning Out: Tips for Anti-Racism Committee Members C Wednesday, December 1,
2:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: In 2020, many institutions declared themselves "anti-racist" and as a result many of us have found ourselves on committees, task forces, and working groups all charged with the enormous task of translating these goals into action. Hear about my experience as the chair of my department's anti-racism committee and advice about how to do this work without exhausting yourself and throwing up your hands. Get tips for prioritizing initiatives, working with colleagues, addressing student demands for immediate change, and dealing with institutional resistance. With humor and a deep respect for all who take this work on, find out how to do this work in a way that feels energizing, not demoralizing.
  • Block: C (Wednesday, December 1, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Courtney Marshall, Phillips Exeter Academy (NH)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Savage Return to Kalayaan, Hustisya, Kapayapaan: Re-Indigenizing, Decolonizing, and Humanizing Pilipinx Narratives C Wednesday, December 1,
2:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Explore what it means to decolonize and re-indigenize funds of knowledge and ways of thinking. Pilipinx educators center kalayaan (freedom), hustisya (justice), kapayapaan (peace) journey to restore indigenous cultural orientations to modern consciousness by merging current and indigenous socio-cultural orientations, learning lessons from ancestral wisdom (Jocano 1998), and their lived experiences. How do educators born into histories of colonization—as “savages” to indoctrinate—collectively disrupt the throughlines of pedagogical imperialism? Engage in a critical consciousness framework that amplifies indigenous epistemologies to prime reflective practices toward liberation from the cognitive cage of the oppressor, the just return of power to oppressed people, and the restoration of peace as the inner wholeness of selves.
  • Block: C (Wednesday, December 1, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Maria Graciela Alcid, Buckingham Browne & Nichols School (MA); Reanne Young, The Roeper School (MI); Emilia Bautista King, Sidwell Friends School (DC); Rochelle Reodica, Rochelle Reodica Consulting; Melissa Lawlor, Milton Academy (MA); Justine Ang Fonte, JAF Kalusugan, LLC; Maria Paz Alegre, The Allen-Stevenson School (NY)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
The Black Woman's Self-Care Playbook: Interrupting and Addressing Intersectional Identity-Based Discrimination in the Workplace C Wednesday, December 1,
2:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Battling marginalization and oppression is specifically stressful for Black women due to the various forms of discrimination they encounter as as result of their intersectional social identities. Designed for Black women, this workshop provides you the opportunity to embody this year's theme "Reckoning with Impacts, Rolling with Just Intent" in your personal and professional lives. Engage in large group discussions, case studies, and self-discovery exercises to equip you with the knowledge, skills, and evidence-based practices you can use immediately to interrupt the intersectional identity-based discrimination that Black women face using self-care that fortifies your health and wellness. Dive into applicable theoretical frameworks and scholarly research that align with the focus on self-efficacy and empowerment.
  • Block: C (Wednesday, December 1, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Shanta Smith, Radical Self-Care 4 Educators, LLC
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit, and Soul
Truth-Telling: A Strategy for Teaching Counternarratives C Wednesday, December 1,
2:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: One way education can move us forward and through racism is by intentionally teaching about racism. Truth-telling is part of the purpose of teaching and requires students to develop counternarratives (Delgado, et al 1995). Due to the long-standing biased curriculum in U.S. schools, along with biased media and other sources, we have developed a racialized imagination gap (Thomas 2019). Education and educators can do better once we know better. Learn about designing lessons (in any subject) to explicitly teach counternarratives and move students into anti-bias and anti-racist learning. We should fight for the future we want to see; we can do it through our classrooms.
  • Block: C (Wednesday, December 1, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Roberto German and Lorena German, Multicultural Classroom (FL)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, and Activism
Coming to Work the Next Day: Managing Your Classrooms (K-12) Following Tragedy, Disaster, and Trauma C Wednesday, December 1,
2:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: From the kindergartener asking, "Who is Derek Chauvin?" to the sixth grader asserting, "But Asian people should just be less passive," to the 12th grader musing, "...but he did try to run away, so...," coming to work the day after national tragedies can be emotional and daunting. There is no single right answer for navigating our classrooms when we are grappling with unsettling public events that are rooted in oppression. Join this interactive workshop to consider equity-focused pedagogical best practices for responding to students' needs, while also balancing self-care and colleague support
  • Block: C (Wednesday, December 1, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Lora McManus, The Blake School (MN)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
Getting Ready for Prime Time: A Tool Kit for Pursuing a Senior School Leadership Role C Wednesday, December 1,
2:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Advancing one’s career in independent schools should be done with purpose and planning. Hear two heads of school present the complexities of the journey to senior administration. Securing a senior leadership position requires not only knowledge, skills, and experience but also a level of preparation and professional development often overlooked by job applicants. Discuss savvy approaches to the position search, interview, and hiring processes. Explore the importance of setting an intention, avoiding self-sabotage, seeking guidance from sponsors, and relying on mentors. Receive strategies for ascertaining your personal and professional alignment with the mission, philosophy, and culture of a school; preparing for stages of the interview process; and maintaining professionalism during the post-interview and hiring processes.
  • Block: C (Wednesday, December 1, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Brenda Crawley, Plymouth Meeting Friends School (PA); Angela Garcia, Friends Community School (MD)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
Creating Space: Applying Psychological Safety Framing to Interpret African American Leadership in Predominantly White Educational Institutions C Wednesday, December 1,
2:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Using the Psychological Safety Framework, this workshop emphasizes the importance of BIPOC educational leaders in predominantly white educational institutions. Learn how psychological safety within school settings can create intentional cultures associated with innovation, risk-taking, and disruption. Explore how educational leaders can create the requisite spaces for BIPOC and coconspirator faculties to promote change within educational institutions. Dive into effective strategies for leveraging BIPOC leadership toward disruptive growth for more inclusive learning communities. Take the opportunity to pose questions, get onboard with strategies via proven leadership in independent schools, and engage in academically informed discussions that account for your school’s context.
  • Block: C (Wednesday, December 1, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Kama Bruce, St. Andrew's Episcopal School (TX); Joshua Childs and Terrance Green, University of Texas at Austin College of Education; Khadija Fredericks, Saint Andrew's Episcopal School (CA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Time for Change: 2021 Research on the Impact of DEI Practitioners on Independent School Campuses C Wednesday, December 1,
2:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: In an increasingly diverse nation, establishing representative, equitable, and inclusive work environments has become a prominent discussion for many organizations. For NAIS, this journey toward a more diverse and inclusive institution began over 40 years ago with strategies to integrate independent schools and expand DEI practices across its vast partnership of 1,600 schools nationwide. In this study, the researchers explored how the presence of a DEI practitioner on an independent school campus affects staff culture and DEI professional development offerings.
  • Block: C (Wednesday, December 1, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Mike Brown, Researcher; Seth Swihart, Vanderbilt University
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
In Spite of the Numbers: Lower School Multiracial Affinity Groups in Predominantly White Spaces C Wednesday, December 1,
2:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Particularly in the shadow of recent events and attacks on verifiable history, it is imperative for historically marginalized students who find themselves in predominantly white spaces in independent schools to have a sense of belonging. With approximately 30% students of color (Black, Brown, Indigenious, Asian) in our lower school, we initiated developmentally age-appropriate multiracial groups from K-5th grade as an alternative to traditional racially based affinity groups because of low numbers. Hear from students, faculty, and administrators reflecting on the promising impacts of these groups and get introduced to strategies, tools, and ideas by grade level. Take away frameworks and resources to guide your own initiation and vertical alignment of heterogeneous affinity groups.
  • Block: C (Wednesday, December 1, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Kamisha Morrison, Michelle Mullins-Means, Emma Ferek, and Jelani Watkins, Hawken School (OH)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Do I Belong Here? Navigating the Complexities of Puerto Rican Identities in a PWI C Wednesday, December 1,
2:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Join us to use storytelling techniques to unpack, analyze, and make sense of the complexities of working as educators of color in a predominantly white institution (PWI). Listen as presenters share their personal journeys of diverse Puerto Rican ethnic identity exploration and some strategies they’ve implemented for creating meaningful spaces for validation and advocacy at their school. Implement storytelling techniques to share your own narrative of identity exploration and allyship co-creation. The conceptual distinction between inclusion and belonging serves as a central theme, emphasizing the co-creation of intentional practices of allyship in our educational environments. Cultural artifacts provide a medium for connection and meaningful analysis of our shared identities.
  • Block: C (Wednesday, December 1, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Kyra Mihalski and Nabila Irizarry, Hawken School (OH)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
A Love Letter to Women of Color C Wednesday, December 1,
2:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: “Awakening to love can only happen as we let go of our obsession with power and domination.” —bell hooks. As women of color, what does our awakening to love look, feel, and sound like? As women of color associated with independent schools and education, where do we make space for our love of self and others to flourish? We invite all our sisters of color to contemplate these questions in abundance and generosity. Beyond the individualized rhetoric of self-care, we want to articulate and harvest the richness found in forms of togetherness that nourish and boost us. Join us to create a space that is for us, by us, which centers women of color and love.
  • Block: C (Wednesday, December 1, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Sherri Spelic, American International School Vienna (Austria); Minjung Pai, JONES
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit, and Soul
Shut Up and Dribble? Interrogating Academic Expectations and Outcomes for Black Students in Independent Schools C Wednesday, December 1,
2:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Discuss the ideas of athlete privilege, whether independent schools confer the same academic benefits upon Black athletes as they do to the general student body, and how schools can guard against overreliance on sports for attracting/developing Black students. Examine a theoretical framework for bolstering academic results for Black students (both athletes and non-athletes) and explore important research questions to pose at your independent school.
  • Block: C (Wednesday, December 1, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Kamal James, James Education LLC; Lawrence Alexander, Carney Sandoe & Associates (MA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Wanting to Belong: Native Hawaiian Teachers Sense of Belonging at an Independent School D Thursday, December 2,
1:00 PM-2:00 PM
  • Summary: Examine native Hawaiian teachers' sense of belonging at a school founded by missionaries in Honolulu. Explore spaces where they feel they belong and where they do not. We invite educational stakeholders to consider BIPOC teachers’ sense of belonging at their institution, ask you to consider the educational culture/history that hinders BIPOC teachers from feeling like they belong at a school and what can schools do to increase a greater sense of belonging for their teachers. Share moʻolelo (stories) of the challenges of belonging to a school. See how the perspectives of Hawaiian teachers may increase BIPOC awareness and solutions for your school.
  • Block: D (Thursday, December 2, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Ka'eokulani Vasconcellos, Punahou School (HI)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
Radical Harmony: The Transformative Relationship Between Music Therapy and Restorative Justice D Thursday, December 2,
1:00 PM-2:00 PM
  • Summary: When a student's stress response is activated, it is impossible for them to learn. At Esperanza Academy, we use music therapy and restorative justice practices in conjunction to provide holistic and transformative techniques that address the negative effects of adverse childhood experiences (ACES) and create a happier, healthier, and justice-centered school community. Music therapy grounded in restorative justice has improved the healing process specifically for students exposed to complex trauma. Through collaboration between these departments, students practice relationship building and developing trust while they build valuable conflict resolution skills. Learn about the benefits of these two practices to meet the social and emotional needs of students and community, as well as experience a community-building circle centering music!
  • Block: D (Thursday, December 2, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Kristina Dolce and Cynthia Pimentel Koskela, Esperanza Academy (MA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Afro-Latinx: Exploring Cultural Complexities in the Latinx Community D Thursday, December 2,
1:00 PM-2:00 PM
  • Summary: Afro-Latinx is used by individuals who acknowledge their African ancestry within the context of their Latinx identity. The usage of Afro-Latinx has given visibility to the nuanced experiences of individuals who frequently confront racism within and outside of the Latinx community. The term has been used to combat anti-Blackness and bring attention to the history of colonialism and white supremacy within the Latinx community. Explore the anti-Black messaging and cultural challenges experienced by Afro-Latinx students. Delve into issues of colorism, transnationalism, and intersectionality to better understand Afro-Latinx student identity development. Discuss programming and curricular design that affirms and engages Afro-Latinx students.
  • Block: D (Thursday, December 2, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Tibisay Hernandez, Grand River Solutions
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Empathy Walks and Equity Audits: Tapping into the Inner Work of Racial Justice D Thursday, December 2,
1:00 PM-2:00 PM
  • Summary: In the process of racial reckoning, many schools and organizations dedicate substantial resources and take precious time to conduct analysis by outside experts, which often reinforces what BIPOC, LGBTQIA students, and other community members could have told them before complex studies are written. This session is not intended to deny data, but to amplify lived experiences. Stories from community members can serve as data. Alternative literacies can inform. And we each hold solutions with and within ourselves. Share some approaches for conducting equity audits and empathy walks using non-Western analytical tools, tapping into stories, making empathy visible and actionable, and looking at the power of “inner work” for lasting change.
  • Block: D (Thursday, December 2, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Eric Dozier and Homa Tavangar, The Oneness Lab; Mahtab Mahmoodzadeh, The Overlake School (WA); Sumner McCallie, McCallie School (TN)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit, and Soul
Breaking the White-Centered Cycle D Thursday, December 2,
1:00 PM-2:00 PM
  • Summary: Do you need to break the cycle of centering whiteness in your curriculum? Do you want to learn how to use perspective-taking as an entry point to teaching elementary-aged students hard history? How can you intentionally include equally weighted perspectives in your curriculum? How do you align your lesson content with calls for accountability from stakeholders such as students, parents, and the subjects of your curriculum content? How do you train students to critically examine who is telling the story and whose perspective is missing? Using an early American colonial settlement as a case study, go through the process of reexamining curriculum with a focus on multiple perspectives.
  • Block: D (Thursday, December 2, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Rachel Levin, Shannon Thomas, and Erica Thompson, St. Patrick's Episcopal Day School (DC)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
Decolonizing Our Minds: Amplifying Teachers’ and Students’ BIPOC Cultures to Inspire Responsible Action D Thursday, December 2,
1:00 PM-2:00 PM
  • Summary: Rooting out systems of white supremacy is key to transforming our students’ experiences. Explore the importance of decolonizing our minds as teachers to break down white supremacist culture in the classroom. As antiracist educators, including those of us who are BIPOC, we must face the truth that our minds have been colonized if we participated in Western education systems. Whiteness permeates mainstream culture along with school culture around acceptable behavior and learning goals. Get highlights of how we used our BIPOC cultures, especially Hawaiian culture as led by Jazelle, as an underpinning of our second grade curriculum to inspire responsible action toward creating more equitable, safer, and stronger communities at school and in the greater community.
  • Block: D (Thursday, December 2, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Marcelle Valladares and Jazelle Trubiani, Catlin Gabel School (OR)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, and Activism
Moving from Awareness to Action: Talking Doesn't Cook Rice D Thursday, December 2,
1:00 PM-2:00 PM
  • Summary: Many of the sessions at PoCC raise your awareness about diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging. But moving from awareness to action requires an understanding of the problem you are trying to solve, an analysis of the problem's cause and effect, and viable next steps. Join us to focus on tools to enhance your ability to effect a change with your newfound awareness. Get introduced to the root causes of an issue, develop a theory of action, and identify change ideas. Receive tools and easy-to-interpret graphics to describe them, why you use them, and how to use them. Get help understanding how a process of continuous improvement helps move teams to address inequities and exclusion within our schools.
  • Block: D (Thursday, December 2, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Susan Nattrass and Alphana Hobbs, Pacific Ridge School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
Coaching BIPOC for Leadership Development and Career Advancement D Thursday, December 2,
1:00 PM-2:00 PM
  • Summary: Executive coaching is emerging as a game changer that levels the playing field for aspiring, new, and experienced leaders. Discuss what distinguishes leadership coaching from mentoring, life coaching, and other forms of consultation and support. Hear why schools should support executive coaching for people of color in leadership, how coaching can foster self-awareness and growth, and how to assess your readiness for this career and life-changing journey. Explore the critical topic of why people of color in particular can benefit from coaching and look at how specific leadership challenges can be addressed through coaching, to help you achieve your goals and fulfill your potential.
  • Block: D (Thursday, December 2, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Cathy Shelburne, California Association of Independent Schools, Irvenia Waters, Waters Leadership Coaching; Lucinda Lee Katz, Carney Sandoe & Associates
Leadership & Management for Equity, Inclusion, Anti-racism, and Social Justice
From Brave Spaces to Systemic Institutional Change D Thursday, December 2,
1:00 PM-2:00 PM
  • Summary: Many diversity practitioners who are just starting out in this work often jump to the "what can I do to change this racist institution" before setting the necessary foundation for implementing institutional change. This includes things like mission and head of school alignment with diversity initiatives, conversations with the board of trustees, brave conversations with leadership teams, tending to the belonging needs of current families of color, challenging our own biases as adults, etc. Building this foundation can take years and we need co-collaborators and accomplices to collectively push the initiatives forward. Join us for an interactive discussion about how to set the building blocks and have the brave conversations needed for systemic institutional change. Walk away with a sample DEI implementation plan.
  • Block: D (Thursday, December 2, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Lily Medina, Seattle Country Day School (WA); Chiara Di Lello, Village Community School (NY)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Asian Spaces for Asian Faces: The Power of Regional Conferences D Thursday, December 2,
1:00 PM-2:00 PM
  • Summary: Launched in 2011, the Asian American Footsteps Conference (AAFC) aimed directly at centering the experiences and perspectives of Asian-identifying students attending independent, secondary schools in New England. Ten conferences later, students look forward to this series of empowering workshops, networking opportunities, and a keynote address. The bedrock of AAFC sits on these goals: Inspire youth to embrace their identity and culture; educate students through stimulating workshops and speakers; connect and foster a community within the independent school network to share ideas and experiences; affirm experiences of Asian, Asian American, and mixed-heritage Asian students. Come learn about our journey from panelists who have served as conference organizers and hosts and how you and your school can build regional connections for your Asian-identifying student community.
  • Block: D (Thursday, December 2, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Aya Murata, Phillips Academy (MA); Vivian WuWong, Milton Academy (MA); Szu-Hui Lee, Phillips Exeter Academy (NH); Pierre Yoo, Hotchkiss School (CT)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Racial Trauma and the Path Toward Healing D Thursday, December 2,
1:00 PM-2:00 PM
  • Summary: Well-intentioned educators and students may mean no harm, but the impact often hurts. These things happen, but how do we all move forward? Three educators of color (two school counselors and a school administrator) with 20 years of combined experience in PWIs in PK-12th grade school settings describe symptoms and impact of racial trauma and paths to resolve racial trauma. Explore real case scenarios and examples of courageous conversations, strategies, and skill-sets used toward building healthy pathways for the intrapersonal self, interpersonal relationships, and the school-wide dynamic. No more resorting to just Band-Aids; it's time we get equipped to work toward true healing.
  • Block: D (Thursday, December 2, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Christina Kim, Gilman School (MD); Porscha Henson and Malika DeLancey, The Park School of Baltimore (MD)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit, and Soul
Using Restorative Justice to Address Racially Violent Language: A Case Study Using Street Data D Thursday, December 2,
1:00 PM-2:00 PM
  • Summary: East Bay School for Boys is a single-sex school in Berkeley, California. Our mission is to empower and engage the courageous and justice-minded adults of tomorrow. We use restorative justice as the core of our accountability system. Two years ago racist graffiti started appearing weekly on the walls of our small school. Hear how our restorative practice transformed the student who wrote the graffiti, his family, his class, and our community. We hope to show you through this case how you can use street data, equitable classroom culture, and restorative practices even in the most harmful situations to rebuild community and address racism to transform our young people rather than contribute to the school to prison pipeline.
  • Block: D (Thursday, December 2, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Dana Rosenberg and Kamia Cuevas-Payne, East Bay School for Boys (CA); Jamila Dugan, Saffir Consulting
Advancing Resilience Among Students and Faculty of Color: Strategies for Supporting BIPOC Community Members E Friday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: Students and faculty of color have faced incredible pressure from multiple fronts: COVID-19, violence—both visible and invisible—against minorities, and a national reckoning with structural and systemic racism. As COVID-19 has disproportionately affected people of color, there has also been increased discrimination, xenophobia, and hate crimes targeting Black, Hispanic, and Asian people. In studying more than 30,000 students and 7,000 adults during COVID-19, Authentic Connections (AC) examined the impact of DEI initiatives and other school climate factors on levels of important mental health indicators—anxiety, depression, rule-breaking, and feelings of isolation. Hear AC describe which aspects of school life were most linked to well-being and share best practices that school administrators can use to support people of color in their community.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Suniya Luthar and Nina Kumar, Authentic Connections
Data Use in Activism: Evidence-based Equity Practice, Research and Evaluation
Anti-Racism Community Reading and Journal Groups: A Model Built Within the School House E Friday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: In order to create opportunities for all employees of our preschool-12 school to have meaningful, frequent conversations around anti-racism, diversity, and equity, members of our faculty and staff created the READ initiative (Read and Educate ourselves on Anti-Racism and Diversity). One day each month, with multiple time options per day, members of our faculty and staff discussed articles. As a Quaker school, our reading groups were modeled along the lines of a meeting for worship, where queries were crafted in advance to facilitate conversations. Delve into the background of how the program was developed and implemented, the success of our first year, and plans for the future. Finally, participate in the experience by engaging in a brief session.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Ken Aldridge and Erica Childs, Wilmington Friends School (DE)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
The Power of the Black Group Chat: Support and Solidarity for Black Faculty E Friday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: Following the [email protected] social media movement, it was evident that Black teachers needed space to unpack and process the impact of different events and the reality of what it means to be a Black faculty member at a PWI community during a racial reckoning. We uncovered a need to protect the Black students who remained at the school and process our collective racial trauma. Together, Black teachers created a network of support, including celebrating our survival of white supremacy. It was through this vehicle that we strategized and cared for each other, taking our Black affinity group to a deeper place of connection and healing, creating a model for the future, emblematic of the power of Black solidarity.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Ralinda Watts, RalindaSpeaks Consulting (CA); Cliff Mason, Sequoyah School (CA); Anthony Gaskins, Brentwood School (CA); Letreanna Jackson, Children's Community School (CA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Building Capacity Using a “Divide and Conquer” Approach to DEI E Friday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: School-wide DEI work cannot rest solely on the shoulders of one director. Learn how one school has taken the “divide and conquer” approach to building DEI capacities of various constituencies through parents’ groups, faculty task forces, and other avenues. Trace our pathway to increasing understanding and participation from community members. Discuss how we landed on a unique division of labor, led by our director of equity, curriculum, and instruction and community liaison for DEI, and how our leadership has galvanized students, parents, faculty, and staff in a mission to cultivate a sense of belonging for all. Hear from a panel of board members, faculty, parents, and students about their learning experiences as a result of this “divide and conquer” approach.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Janet Lee, Meera Ratnesar, and Earleen Kennedy, Curtis School (CA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Race in America: Creating an Anti-Racist Humanities Course That Directly Tackles Racialization E Friday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: Follow the inception and creation of a high school humanities class based entirely on race and racialization. Here how we got our course off the ground, what it took to do so at our institution, how the course went for our students, and the effects of having the course in the curriculum at large. Engage in discussion on how this process might help educators at other institutions and how you might be able to use our experience to build a similar course of your own
  • Block: E (Friday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Tim Poole and LaDarius Drew, The Frederick Gunn School (CT)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, and Activism
Let's Talk About It! Anti-Oppressive Unit and Lesson Plan Design E Friday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: The ongoing protests for racial justice have forced newly and well-established independent schools to critically assess and acknowledge how their curriculums perpetuate racist and oppressive systems. Humanities and STEM teachers alike are asking: How do I craft anti-oppressive unit and lesson plans that elevate marginalized voices? Attend this hands-on workshop to get a reflective, methodical approach to curriculum design. By fusing Understanding by Design, social-emotional learning, and critical race theory, we provide you with a comprehensive, anti-oppressive, practical-design approach that centers the experiences of traditionally marginalized students. By the end of the session, you will have engaged in self-reflection about the urgency of this work and with the skills to design inclusive lessons.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: MarQuis Chappell and Maureen Aguilar, Harpeth Hall School (TN)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
Feeding Yourself When You Are Fed Up: Connecting Resilience and DEI Work E Friday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: Learn how to empower educators to become mobilized activists who are equipped to disrupt racism using resilience. The Social Emotional Ethical (SEE) Learning Framework provides a foundation for developing a faculty of inclusive leaders through three domains. In the Personal Domain, the educator develops self-awareness in order to see, self-compassion so they can bear to see, and self-regulation in order to stay with what is seen. In the Social Domain, the educator focuses on interpersonal awareness so they can see what is needed, compassion so they want to try to meet the need, and relationship skills so that efforts are effective. In the Systems Domain, an activist develops a deep understanding of interdependence and common humanity, which leads to community engagement and activism.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Stephanie Stephens and Carri Carver, Woodward Academy (GA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
A Feminist Manifesto: Asian American Women Leaders Embodying Cuturally Responsive School Leadership E Friday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: Hear Lilia Cai-Hurteau discuss aspects of her dissertation that intersect Asian American feminism with culturally responsive school leadership. Grounded in intersectionality theory, her study describes characteristics of culturally responsive school leadership based on Khalifa’s (2019) framework, how epistemologies influence leadership practice, and how these Asian American women heads of schools negotiate the transactional nature of independent schools to harness the transformational power of educational leadership. Her findings challenge the prevalent neoliberal and representational politics to reveal that Asian American women, despite not being associated with leadership historically, can play a significant role in countering the continuing contexts of oppression embedded in the education system and reimagine schools into spaces of radical possibilities for the future.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Lilia Cai-Hurteau, Phillips Academy (MA)
Leadership & Management for Equity, Inclusion, Anti-racism, and Social Justice
Let’s Get It Right: A Collaborative Effort Ensuring Females and Students of Color Thrive Mathematically E Friday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: As educators our job is to support, encourage, and challenge all of our students. As mathematics educators we know that this is not happening for many of our female students and students of color as evidenced by their low presence in higher level math courses nationally. For several years, the GDS Math Task Force has worked in collaboration with area independent schools to develop strategies to support our underrepresented PK-12 students in mathematics. Hear about our process, the developments we have made thus far, and how we plan to make changes for our female students and students of color in mathematics. We hope to learn from participants in this space to share insights and experiences.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Luisa Myavec, Greenwich Country Day School (CT); Suzy Hamon and Bryan Williams, Georgetown Day School (DC)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Mirrors and Windows: Small Steps to Big Change in Traditional Organizations E Friday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: Not every school or organization will respond positively to DEI work, but we know the work must happen. But how do we engage communities that are "not ready" for the work, in the work? How do we work in contexts where certain areas of exclusion are still permitted (religious schools, international contexts, etc.)? One approach is to look for the doors everyone can walk through. Join us to get practical tools around identity development and cross-cultural communication that can be used in difficult contexts. Take home strategies with steps and resources to help your institutions that are still not genuinely working on DEI issues take real steps forward.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Kapono Ciotti, American International School in Egypt (Egypt)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Using Dr. King's "Steady, Loving, Confrontation" Strategy to Leverage Present-Day Youth Activism E Friday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: Lynda Blackmon Lowery, a civil rights activist who grew up in segregated Selma, Alabama, was just 13 when Dr. King spoke about getting the right to vote for Black Americans. Jailed nine times and brutally beaten on “Bloody Sunday,” Lynda celebrated her 15th birthday on the 54-mile Selma to Montgomery March. Talking with Lynda and using footage from the musical drama adapted from her award-winning memoir, learn about this unique story, which focuses on the role of young people in the movement and explores ways to apply lessons and address present-day voter rights issues, including voter suppression. Leave with open hearts and minds, empathy, insight, and inspiration to support youth at a critical moment in history.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Liz Fernández, Ethical Culture Fieldston School (NY); Lynda Blackmon Lowery, New Heritage Theatre Group / Loire Valley Theater Festival
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Integrating Healing-Centered Engagement into a DEIA School Program E Friday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: Learn how integrating healing-centered engagement into a DEIA program supports BIPOC students in healing the painful emotions of feeling ignored, invisible, minimized, and misunderstood within a PWI. Through the guidance of a caring and loving practitioner, students co-create a brave space to introspect on heart-expanding topics, which allows us to practice reflective conversation and vulnerability. Through the modeling of the practitioner, students witness compassionate communication techniques and equitable leadership. In this space, students feel affirmed and validated to know that "our bodies are not an apology” and that our existence matters. This equips us with the strength and self-assuredness to honor our needs and own our voices.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Samantha Hosein, The Brearley School (NY); Karmay Gorley, Gloetry Assembly
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit, and Soul
When Being the Work Is Doing the Work: Leadership Stories of Women of Color E Friday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: While there is data about women heads of schools, there are other leadership spaces. What is the dynamic tension of holding key decision-making roles in a school while simultaneously being the representation of “diversity” for a school community because of one’s gender and race/ethnicity? Often, women of color in decision-making/leadership roles contend with these questions as they carry out their daily responsibilities. When conflict arises, who does their school community see as the leader and who gets to decide these identities? Explore your own stories of leadership and discuss how the intersection of gender and race/ethnicity is both a statement of equity as well as a “lightning rod” role that attracts white supremacy and patriarchy.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Geetha Holdsworth and Leslie O'Hanlon, Bosque School (NM)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit, and Soul
Biracial Identity Formation in Adolescence F Friday, December 3,
1:30 PM-2:30 PM
  • Summary: When the 2000 Census in the United States and Canada was conducted, it included a mixed-race box. This marked a turning point for how mixed-race people were viewed. However, two decades later, there is still more to be learned. Through Critical Race Theory and the Biracial Identity Development Model, we begin to understand how viewing biracial youth through a monoracial lens creates a gap in identity for the young person. Join us to outline the varying factors that influence how a biracial person forms identity and how educators can encourage exploration by understanding implicit bias and allowing possibilities. The opportunity to freely decide one's racial identity increases self-esteem in young biracial folks while lowering anxiety. When the whole person is acknowledged, people thrive.
  • Block: F (Friday, December 3, 1:30 PM-2:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Charissa Whittingham, The Bishop Strachan School (Canada)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
Awesome ABS (Asian and Black Solidarity) Workout! F Friday, December 3,
1:30 PM-2:30 PM
  • Summary: Join us to discover the concrete and actionable building blocks we used to cultivate our capacity for active Afro-Asian racial allyship that has deepened our resilience. To help make it feel real, we’ll ground these building blocks in a series of down-to-earth and relatable examples that follow the arc of our capacity-building. Come with thoughts, questions, and an open heart and ready for discussion. After sharing resources, storytelling, visual facilitation, and open conversation, leave inspired, informed, and ready to implement your learning in your valued professional (and personal) relationships. This interactive workshop is designed for participants who want practical support to create relationships of collaboration, allyship, and solidarity across identity lines.
  • Block: F (Friday, December 3, 1:30 PM-2:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Yuka Hachiuma, Lick-Wilmerding High School (CA); Nikkia Young, Head Royce School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Social Justice
How Colorblind Racism Manifests in Independent Schools and What We Can Do to Combat It F Friday, December 3,
1:30 PM-2:30 PM
  • Summary: There's been a lot of focus on BIPOC student experiences at predominantly white independent schools (PWIS), but not a lot of specificity on PWIS practices that produce their marginalizing experiences. It’s time we stop asking BIPOC students to adjust to PWIS culture and instead ask PWIS to do better. Learn about Bonilla-Silva’s concept of “colorblind racism” as it applies to independent schools and how seemingly neutral “colorblindness” negatively affects both BIPOC and white individuals. Hear key findings from the presenter’s UCLA-based research study, guided by Pedro Noguera, that yielded strong indications of student encounters with colorblind racism at independent schools. Also examine key findings regarding effective culturally responsive practices, as well as alumni of color perspectives.
  • Block: F (Friday, December 3, 1:30 PM-2:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Asako Kurosaka-Jost and Brandon Lopez, Brentwood School (CA); Arapaie Black, The Center for Early Education (CA)
Data Use in Activism: Evidence-based Equity Practice, Research and Evaluation
Moving the Needle Toward Meaningful Institutional Change: The Journey of Oldfields School F Friday, December 3,
1:30 PM-2:30 PM
  • Summary: The journey to creating a just institution doesn't happen overnight. It requires a sustained commitment to critically assessing all institutional practices through an equity lens, administrative buy-in, and radical honesty. This school year, Oldfields School, a small girls’ school outside of Baltimore, started on the journey to equity and saw a significant cultural shift in their institution. In partnership with The Wells Collective, Oldfields engaged in critical reflection about their mission and values that allowed them to determine and implement changes. In addition to learning about Oldfields’ journey, join us to engage with strategies used at Oldfields to develop a DEI-aligned mission, build a team of committed change agents, and create a plan to make incremental change in their school.
  • Block: F (Friday, December 3, 1:30 PM-2:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Kalea Selmon and Akailah Jenkins McIntyre, The Wells Collective; David Perfield and Caroline Blaum, Oldfields School (MD)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Radical Joy: Healing Circle Live at PoCC F Friday, December 3,
1:30 PM-2:30 PM
  • Summary: Audre Lorde said, "Self-care is an act of political warfare." The past year has truly felt like warfare. From learning to teach remotely while in service, responding to growing social justice movements, acknowledging the experiences highlighted by [email protected], rising Anti- "Insert non-dominant persona," to the calls for banning anti-racism education, our very lives have felt like they were on trial. Join us in a space to begin personal healing from traumas we have endured, learn how to take care of our mental and emotional health in our home institutions, and find solace in the community. Engage in art/music therapy, small-group discussions, and mediation through the lens of people of color. Please bring a journal, paper, and drawing materials of your choice.
  • Block: F (Friday, December 3, 1:30 PM-2:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Michelle Holmes, University of Chicago Lab School (IL); Johara Tucker, Head Royce School (CA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit, and Soul
Belonging and Job Satisfaction of BIPOC Educators: Study Findings and Implications for Schools and Leaders F Friday, December 3,
1:30 PM-2:30 PM
  • Summary: Examine the findings and implications for practice on the comparative experiences of belonging, support, and job satisfaction of white and BIPOC educators in Los Angeles area independent schools, with a deeper exploration of the experiences of BIPOC educators in relation to institutional and leadership support and challenges of discrimination in and adaptation to predominantly white schools. While the population sample is based in the Los Angeles area, the findings could be generalized to other locations; school leaders are encouraged to attend. After a presentation of the findings and a discussion of implications for practice, engage in small- and whole-group facilitated discussions about the applicability of the findings to the schools of those in attendance, with a focus on developing institutional and leadership practices and policies that promote belonging for BIPOC educators.
  • Block: F (Friday, December 3, 1:30 PM-2:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Jason Kim-Seda, Education Researcher
Unsticking Stagnant Content: Pedagogical Approaches for Inclusion and Solidarity F Friday, December 3,
1:30 PM-2:30 PM
  • Summary: BIPOC educators and their allies started fighting for anti-racist education long before the murder of George Floyd. While some independent schools are making deep, systemic strides, performative calls for equity and justice have too often fallen short. These educators are acquainted with research-based best practices; they have been advocating and pushing for curricular changes over the last several months, years, or decades. Still, they receive pushback and excuses. This session aims to show educators inclusive, student-centered pedagogical approaches to anti-racism that do not require a curricular overhaul. Leave with practical, classroom-ready tools designed to move toward a student-centered classroom that promotes inclusion and solidarity, even if the majority of the content does not—yet.
  • Block: F (Friday, December 3, 1:30 PM-2:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Candace Crawford and Ella Taranto, St. Stephen's & St. Agnes School (VA)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, and Activism
The BIPOC Advancement Officer Survival Guide F Friday, December 3,
1:30 PM-2:30 PM
  • Summary: In the wake of the [email protected] movement and the subsequent backlash against “woke culture,” independent schools have found themselves ill-equipped to deal with the controversies that have come their way as they try to create more equitable institutions. Advancement departments, which deal daily with demanding donors, inquisitive volunteers, and angry alumni, have been on the front line in absorbing community members’ (and the conservative media’s) outrage at our anti-racist initiatives, as well as processing stories of pain and injustice from Black community members. The toll this takes on BIPOC advancement professionals' mental and physical health, and their relationships with co-workers and others in the school community, can be extreme.
  • Block: F (Friday, December 3, 1:30 PM-2:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Marjorie Jean-Paul, Buckley Country Day School (NY); Jan Abernathy, The Browning School (NY); Courtney Archer-Buckmire, Grace Church School (NY)
Leadership & Management for Equity, Inclusion, Anti-racism, and Social Justice
Building DEI from the Ground Up: One School's Journey F Friday, December 3,
1:30 PM-2:30 PM
  • Summary: Saint Andrew's Episcopal School located in California's Silicon Valley started the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Walk three years ago. Rooted in the Episcopal tradition of inclusion, service, and Christian formation, the school recently called out DEI as an intentional focus of the school. Learn how we began this work and galvanized the community around it. Hear about our successes and challenges and how the events of the past year solidified its importance and relevance.
  • Block: F (Friday, December 3, 1:30 PM-2:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Khadija Fredericks and Erin Stacey, Saint Andrew’s Episcopal School (CA); Christine Fairless, St. Paul's Episcopal School (CA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Post-PoCC Return to PWI Normal: Engaging and Mapping Complexity with a Cognitive Framework F Friday, December 3,
1:30 PM-2:30 PM
  • Summary: BIPOC students and faculty navigated a complex pandemic year in systems operationalizing white supremacy culture through protocols, practices, and pedagogies, while living and learning in the rhetoric of anti-racist frameworks and trauma-informed approaches. As institutions grappled with the mental health crisis during 2020-2021 in their classrooms and communities, how did schools support and care for BIPOC educators and administrators in service of their students through a lens of equity, accountability, and sustainability? Educators and practitioners with backgrounds in psychotherapy and cognition, thinking, and understanding team up to explore a cognitive framework to support a post-PoCC, post-pandemic return to school for BIPOC educators that focuses on the intersection of metacognition of identities, executive functioning skills, and strategic self-advocacy using decolonizing cognitive routines.
  • Block: F (Friday, December 3, 1:30 PM-2:30 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Maria Graciela Alcid, Buckingham Browne & Nichols School (MA); Reanne Young, The Roeper School (MI)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit, and Soul