New this year! #NAISPoCC On Demand

Audio-synced slideshows of 30 PoCC workshops will be available for you to purchase for future use. Bring these dynamic, inspiring, and educational sessions back to your school in one of two ways:

12-month Online Access to All On-Demand Sessions
Access the sessions online for one year. 
NAIS Members: $149
Nonmembers: $199
 
USB of All On-Demand Sessions
Take home a USB of the sessions and access the recordings for an unlimited amount of time. 
NAIS Members: $199
Nonmembers: $249

Browse the listings below to see which workshops are part of this package!

Title Block Time Summary Track
Instituting Reflective Practice Groups to Maximize Inclusivity at Independent Schools On Demand A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: The Reflective Practice Group (RPG) model will be presented as a method to bring the SEED voluntary participation method to scale by making it a professional requirement for all staff, thus actively honoring the importance of training for all teachers on equity and inclusion. The presenter originated the RPG model in a public elementary school setting and then adapted it to his independent elementary school. Through sharing how the model was proposed to school administration, developed, explained to staff, and implemented, this workshop will give participants a step-by-step understanding of how such a model can be realized in their own settings. Facilitation principles and techniques, surveys used, actual lesson plans, and participant feedback will be provided.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 211
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is the value of reflective practice discussion groups for teachers and other school staff at independent schools?
    • How can my independent school develop a reflective practice group program?
    • What are the best practice facilitation skills and session content for reflective practice groups?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Carlos Hoyt, Belmont Day School (MA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Disrupting the System From Within On Demand A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: What’s the impact when we whitewash history? Hear how a few “progressive” educators got tired of kind, well-meaning teachers bringing racism into the classroom by perpetuating the oppressive pedagogy that continues to marginalize people of color. The story begins with Dr. Seuss and ends with rosé.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is a model you can use with colleagues to explore oppressive systems at your school both on an individual and institutional level?
    • How can a professional learning community (PLC) disrupt racist classroom practices and curriculum at your school?
    • How can teachers join forces to explore ideas behind race and its impact on the classroom?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Vanessa Gutierrez, Jenifer Moore, and Nina Austin, The Key School (MD)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
We Wear the Mask: Stories of the Black Girl Experience in Predominantly White Independent Schools On Demand A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Using the theories of critical race, black identity, and black feminism as a conceptual framework, this research explored the role of race/class/gender and parental support as contributing factors to the racial consciousness development of black girls in middle school. An analysis of the narratives of black girls revealed important factors that contributed to the development of a racial consciousness such as the absence of a black faculty advocate, the burden of microaggressions, and the tension to define what it means to be black. Additional findings showed that the participants’ mothers emphasized nurturing black identity and friendships to help guide their daughters through critical racial experiences. Findings led to important recommendations to improve the educational experiences of black girls in predominantly white spaces.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 204
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What issues and themes emerge when Black girls describe their experiences at predominantly white, elite independent schools?
    • What do Black girls identify as positive experiences within this context and what do they believe should change in order to enhance their experience?
    • How do mothers of Black girls in predominantly white, elite independent schools perceive the experiences of their children?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Tina Evans, Brentwood School (CA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Administrators of Color Matter: How to Strengthen Your Candidacy in Pursuit of Leadership Positions On Demand A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Leadership opportunities for people of color in independent schools are increasing, but the overall number of people of color in administrative roles continues to trail far behind our white colleagues. This workshop will explore how you can advance your career in independent schools. We will discuss professional development opportunities that broaden your skill set in order to promote your candidacy, what search committees look for in candidates for leadership positions, and how to navigate the interview process. The workshop will also provide advice on identifying and confronting barriers in your school community that may prohibit your professional growth. We will share best practices for conducting your search as well as anecdotes from the perspectives of both candidates and search committees.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 201
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do you advance your career in independent schools?
    • When is the right time to pursue leadership positions?
    • How do you identify and confront barriers that prohibit the advancement of your career in your school community?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Justin Brandon, Francis W. Parker School (IL); Priscilla Morales, The Park School of Baltimore (MD)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Strategic Design for Equity and Inclusion On Demand A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Leading efforts toward more equitable and inclusive school communities can sometimes feel like pushing a boulder up a steep hill. With challenges that are very complex and often abstract, it can be difficult to design changes in culture and curriculum that will have meaningful and lasting impact. How do you break the boulder into smaller, more liftable rocks? How do you design initiatives that will solve pressing challenges and leverage opportunities for change? This active session will use frameworks from the NAIS Strategy Lab workshops to guide participants through a design process focused on equity and inclusion initiatives at the school. Applying these frameworks to your work can help you design innovations that are purpose-driven, insightful, and actionable.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do I unpack some of our DEI challenges and opportunities to get to the root issue?
    • How can I use a systems thinking approach to design and enhance DEI prototypes and initiatives?
    • What roles should our team members play as we work to design and implement DEI work in our school?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Mark Mitchell and Tim Fish, NAIS
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Colorism in the Latinx Community On Demand B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: “Colorism” is a term commonly used among people of color, but what does this look like in the Latinx community? In this workshop, we will discuss different instances of colorism from varying Latinx lenses. Attendees will explore their own experiences, look at case studies, and walk away with strategies for addressing colorism when they witness it. By changing the narrative in their personal lives and in their schools, participants will be able to spread awareness and create a more equitable and inclusive environment for both educators and students.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 211
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is colorism and how has it affected your identity or that of others in the Latinx community?
    • What strategies can we use to address colorism?
    • How can we spread awareness about colorism in the Latinx community in order create a more equitable environment for educators and students in our school?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Gabmara Alvarez-Spychalski, The Baldwin School (PA); Kerry Kettering-Goens, The Haverford School (PA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
I Woke Up Like This: Teaching and Practicing Authenticity in Predominately White Spaces On Demand B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: As an educator of color, how do we become culturally authentic in predominantly white spaces? In this workshop, we will define cultural authenticity and evaluate whether we as educators are being true to our identities. Attendees will define cultural authenticity for themselves and unpack hindrances that may prevent this from occurring within the institutions they serve. Beyoncé’s artistry serves as an exemplar to provide a framework for the ways in which we navigate mainstream white institutions in an authentic and unapologetic manner. Attendees will walk away with a toolkit to transform their own practice, inspire other educators of color, and teach students of color how to unapologetically express their own intersectional identities in authentic ways within institutions.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 201
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do we as educators use culturally authentic role models, such as Beyonce, to influence and provide a framework in how we navigate predominately white institutions?
    • How do we as educators teach resilience and cultural authenticity to our students of color in predominantly white institutions?
    • How do we ourselves as educators seek to remain authentic to our intersectional identities, push back against spaces that uphold stereotypes, preconceived notions, and underlying white supremacist ideology, and excel within those transformed spaces?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Rashaad Phillips, The Dalton School (NY); Ayesha Numan, Woodside Priory (CA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
DEI Strategic Partnership Gets Results On Demand B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Diversity, equity, and inclusion work is impossible to do alone. It requires an articulated institutional commitment, clear expectations, and a competent team of doers. In this workshop, participants will learn how to design an integrated approach to DEI work, build a diverse and effective team, and strategize communication to highlight the value of this important work.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do I communicate that DEI work is everyone's work?
    • How do I get my school to prioritize DEI work?
    • Who should be on my equity and inclusion team?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Stephanie Bramlett and Sami Atif, Phillips Exeter Academy (NH)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
The Power of BEING in Life and Diversity, Equity, Inclusion Work On Demand B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: It is so easy to get lost in the necessary doing that is associated with diversity, equity, and inclusion work and, more significantly, everyday life. However, the importance of our being in this work and in life is quite powerful in itself. In this workshop, we will explore the power that comes from just showing up as our unique selves every day and how we make a difference not only through what we do but through who we are.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 204
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is my way of BEING?
    • How is my Being related to my work in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion? How do I show up in my everyday life?
    • What are the possibilities if I leverage my Being to impact my life and school community in a more POWERFUL way?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Lisa Pryor, The Orchard School (IN)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
This Wasn't My Plan: Leveraging Unexpected Leadership Paths for People of Color in Independent Schools On Demand B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Many school leaders often say that it was not their intention to pursue leadership in their schools. Further, as people of color we aren’t always tapped when opportunities arise or told where and when to look. While we don’t often know what puts us on the path, taking a step back and studying the various journeys we have taken can offer key takeaways for others considering leadership opportunities. Through examining personal leadership journeys and reflections, this workshop will assist participants in identifying the necessary steps in their pursuit of leadership. Rather than identifying “the” path to leadership, this session will help participants gain insight into the questions to ask and the experiences to consider.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can I identify my leadership path?
    • How do I prepare for my leadership journey?
    • Who can help me in my pursuit of leadership?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Eric Osorio, The Calhoun School (NY); Noni Thomas Lopez, Gordon School (RI); Alewa Cooper, Greens Farms Academy (CT); William Gilyard, Kingswood Oxford School (CT); Erica Corbin, Chapin School (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
“Come get your people”: Activating Asian Americans to Dismantle Anti-Blackness On Demand C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: When children cannot find themselves reflected in the books they read, or when the images they see are distorted, negative, or laughable, they learn a powerful lesson about how they are devalued in the society of which they are a part.—Rudine Sims Bishop, Mirrors, Windows, and Sliding Glass Doors Many Asian Americans have failed to see mirrors, windows, and sliding-glass doors of Asian American activism. This absence and distorted narrative have contributed to our quest to be proximate to whiteness and, as a result, anti-blackness. Join us for a critical workshop on why this inquiry matters as educators and to our work in solidarity with the black community as we interrogate our own issues of identity and race and uplift the common struggle.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 201
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What does Asian anti-Blackness mean and how can we trace its origins?
    • What is the community impact of seeing windows, mirrors, and sliding glass doors for Asian Americans engaged in deep activist work?
    • What steps do we need to take to “come get our people” and align our purpose of cross-racial solidarity?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Liza Talusan, LT Coaching and Consulting, LLC
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Building Institutional Capacity for Sustained Conversation About Race On Demand C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: We are living in an increasingly complex world where the job of school leaders to build community grounded in respectful dialogue has never been more important. Living our missions for inclusion must be structured and deliberate work. In this workshop, school leaders will engage in conversation through case studies and a sharing of ideas for building capacity for sustained discourse about race in our communities. Participants will practice methods for seeding and leading conversation, and they will share ideas for making systemic change.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Affinity group work - What is the impact of our personal identifiers on leading anti-racism efforts?
    • How do we work on strategies, plans for conflict resolution, and practice with leading conversations about race?
    • What are some of the structures we can employ for systemic antiracism in our school?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Eric Temple, Lick-Wilmerding High School (CA); Martha Haakmat, Haakmat Consulting
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Our Histories, Our Selves: Using PoC Stories to Liberate, Co-Create, and Thrive in Humanities Classrooms On Demand C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: When teachers of color bring their full and authentic selves to campus and the classroom, powerful things happen. This includes sharing our personal stories and other empowering narratives about people of color to help students explore past and current events. From enslavement to protest movements to immigration, we will model story-sharing and encourage teachers to push students closer to issues of historical and modern significance while building stronger relationships. This workshop will provide specific examples from the middle school classroom, including literature resources, lesson plans, and templates for creating future curriculum. Participants will have the opportunity to share their personal histories and think about how those stories might engage, inform, and inspire students.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 211
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can we present empowering narratives to and about students of color?
    • How can teachers use their personal histories to inform students about past and current events?
    • What role does identity play in the humanities classroom?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Lesley Younge, Whittle School and Studios (DC); Thu Nguyen, Sidwell Friends School (DC)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Deep From the Heart of Texas: Reimagining the Head of School/Chief Diversity Officer Partnership On Demand C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Let’s face it; times have changed. Independent schools are being battered by today’s tumultuous socio-political/cultural climate. As our students struggle to construct meaning from all the mixed messages, particularly those that challenge our schools’ intent to raise responsible, respectful citizens, we must be steadfast in our commitment to equity and justice work. And key to the success of this work is the relationship between the head of school and the diversity practitioner. This workshop will examine the rationality, positionality, and sustainability of the head-chief diversity officer relationship in building inclusive and equitable school communities at three Texas independent schools.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 204
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are new and different approaches to relationship-building between the Head of School and Chief Diversity Officer?
    • How do you sustain that relationship between the Head and Chief Diversity Officer?
    • What are some of the critical relational and positional power dynamics between the Head of School and Chief Diversity Officer necessary to effectively build community?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Yvonne Adams and Chris Gunnin, St. Stephen's Episcopal School (TX); Gene Batiste and Mark Desjardins, St. John's School (TX); Lee Hark and Karen Bradberry, Greenhill School (TX)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Getting in Sync: Governance and Leadership for Changing Times On Demand C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Exceptional boards are very intentional about structuring themselves and operating in a way that best supports the school in the context in which it exists. Today, that context includes increasing racial and ethnic diversity, and the need to attract, cultivate, and leverage these and other differences to help ensure excellence, relevance, and institutional strength. The result of concerted action on these fronts is leadership and governance working together like the software driving the complex systems and machinery of our lives. Does your board comprise all the people, codes, and networks it needs for a 21st century performance? In this session we’ll outline the changing nature of nonprofit governance today, discuss principles and practices that drive great boards, and share proven strategies for increasing racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity in our governing bodies.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Donna Orem and Caroline Blackwell, NAIS
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
What About the “Mixed” Kid? Multiracial Representation in Children’s Literature On Demand D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: This session features a presentation and discussion on the representation of mixed-race characters in books for children in early childhood and elementary education and why it is important. Research and data address the developmental affects/effects of providing multiracial students with “mirrors” through books. The workshop includes a brief narrative about the presenter’s journey to build a library for her classroom that ensures that every student can find ownership within the books. Participants will take away a cache of resources to find diverse literature for the classroom.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 204
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Why is it important to have visual representation of diverse groups in your curriculum?
    • Is there research that proves diverse books are beneficial?
    • How do I start building my library?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Theresa Fox, Winchester Thurston School (PA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Black Girl Magic: Working With White Women On Demand D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Since over 75% of educators are black and white women, it is important that we work together to support all of our students. Given the dynamics between races, this relationship can be tricky at times. This workshop will examine ways that the magical powers of black women can work with white women in order to co-create a space in our schools aimed at dismantling white supremacy and creating a more just society for all. Presenters will explore strategies that focus on navigating the tough social dynamics between white and black women that can bring about joy in our hallways, classrooms, and boardrooms. Participants will examine real-world issues and share stories of successful working relationships and the steps that it takes to get there.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 201
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do we work alongside white women in our institutions to shift their role from passive ally to active practitioner in order to create equitable schools?
    • How do we embrace the tension between black and white women in education?
    • What are ways we can work together to dismantle white supremacy and affirm our students ability to thrive?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Toni Williamson, Friends Select School (PA); Yvonne Adams, St. Stephen's Episcopal School (TX)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
De Aqui y De Alla: Essential Latinx Topics for Humanities Curriculum On Demand D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: The history and literature of Latino/a/xs from all across the Latin diaspora is something that all too often students have to look for in specific places: Spanish classes, history and English electives, and, of course, self-study. This workshop’s focus will be on exposing middle and upper school humanities teachers to topics that should be part of foundational courses that all students take, particularly as they relate to American history. We will also focus on the inclusion of short stories in English classes to allow students to hear from as many different and diverse voices across the spectrum of Latinx identities as possible. We will look at ways to incorporate current events that deeply affect Latinx people into general History and English classes.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are essential topics in Latinx history that should be taught to all middle and upper school students?
    • How can English teachers add literature by Latinx authors to their curriculum, particularly by using short stories to tell a wide range of narratives about Latinx experiences?
    • How can teachers incorporate current events surrounding migration and other Latinx issues into their curriculum, regardless of whether or not the course specifically centers Latinx people?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Miguel Correa, The Berkeley Carroll School (NY); Priscilla Morales, The Park School (MD)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Islam in Context: Understanding the Diversity and Needs Within Muslim Student Populations On Demand D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Islam is often presented and perceived as a monolithic religion. However, only a quick examination is needed to see that the religion is diverse and fluid. A better understanding of Islam and the diversity within the religion can help us understand the diversity within our Muslim populations at school. As the Muslim student population increases and Ramadan moves through the school year for the next decade, it is important that we know how to meet the needs of these students. This workshop will tackle some basic history and fundamentals as well as explore the success of established cultural competency training for faculty and staff, along with the challenges of establishing and maintaining a Muslim student association.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 211
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can we best support our Muslim student population?
    • What role does race, culture, nationality and ethnicity play into how Islam is practiced?
    • How can we create more inclusive lessons and programs that allow our Muslim students to be their authentic selves?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Changa Bey, MICDS - Mary Institute and St. Louis Country Day School (MO)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Moving the Work Forward: Scaffolding Equity and Inclusion Fundamentals for Community Buy-In On Demand D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: This workshop will aid those who work in service of DEI&SJ progression on their campuses. It will provide maps and materials to create robust pedagogical and emotional support for student-driven initiatives, including models of dialogues and exercises with faculty of all identities. The goal is for participants to create pathways for all constituents—students, parents, faculty, staff, admins—to engage fully and openly in student-led initiatives. In order to affect positive change and embrace the dissonance that comes with real work and advancement, understanding the fundamentals of the language of equity and the necessity of whole community participation is primary. Facility with the culture (language, norms, expectations) of DEI&SJ creates communities willing to examine themselves and participate in the work in pedagogically sound ways.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What models work in scaffolding DEI&SJ work for diverse faculty and parent communities?
    • How does the use of these models seed and strengthen constituent support?
    • How do we front-load community prep to allow for more significant student ownership and success?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Stephanie Barnes, Vistamar School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Why AIM? An Invitation to Affirm and Discover New Opportunities in Advancing an Inclusive School Culture On Demand E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Seeking a more inclusive school culture? Join NAIS staff and peers from independent schools to learn about AIM, a multi-faceted process designed to engage your school community in a process of self-renewal and increasing inclusivity.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Introduction to framework of Appreciative Inquiry
    • Overview of the Components of AIM
    • Identify core members of the AIM Steering Committee members
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Tony Hernandez and Hilary LaMonte, NAIS
Data Use in Activism: Evidence-based Equity and Justice Programming, Research and Evaluation
Growing Young Voices: Understanding Black Lives Matter for Teachers On Demand E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: This presentation is designed to immerse a racially diverse population of students and educators in social justice education. By asking students “Do black lives matter or do all lives matter?” we will expose them to the fallacies that exist in both media and cultural understanding, make connections between today’s Black Lives Matter Movement and the Civil Rights Movement, and engage in social-emotional learning to support their development as young adults. We will help educators navigate the intricacies of teaching social justice issues to students of all ages. Using artwork, articles, and social media postings, we will demonstrate how to support the learning of students as we explore issues like unjust killings by police officers, discrimination, racism, and disenfranchisement.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 201
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do we teach Black Lives Matter to elementary students in a way that is developmentally appropriate and sensitive to a classroom of diverse learners?
    • Why is understanding Black Lives Matter essential to understanding modern American History?
    • How can we use Black Lives Matter as a core social studies curriculum to teach essential skills like critical thinking and literary analysis in an Upper Elementary classroom?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Carl Farrington and Michelle Holmes, The University of Chicago Laboratory Schools (IL)
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Heads of Color Sponsoring and Mentoring Others to Become Heads of Color On Demand E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: This workshop will explore how and why it is important for female heads of color not only to mentor but also to sponsor other women of color to join them at the head’s table. Heads of school will learn how sharing the story of their own leadership journeys will inspire an aspiring leader to grow into headship. Participants seeking mentorship/sponsorship will learn the difference between the two, how to seek out a mentor, and how to stop doubting their own leadership potential. Join two newly appointed heads of school and their mentor/sponsor as they share their own stories and answer questions about why their choice to mentor/sponsor or be mentored/sponsored led them to their current headships.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How will having a mentor/sponsor help me grow professionally?
    • How should I choose that mentor/sponsor?
    • Why should I become a mentor/sponsor?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Veronica Codrington-Cazeau, The Evergreen School (WA); Crissy Caceres, Brooklyn Friends School (NY); Jasmine Harris, St Phillips School (FL)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Equity in STEAM Education and Makerspaces On Demand E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Attendees will learn the importance of creating environments that create equity in STEAM education and makerspaces. This workshop uses hands-on techniques and creates engaging lessons for students. This setting helps build capacity for skills on equity and inclusion. PoC have the lowest participation rate in STEAM in school and the workforce. From a social justice standpoint, teachers have the opportunity to change this injustice. Participants will use their hands to create an engaging lesson. Attendees will walk away with a project they made in this interactive course. Maker-centered learning engages students of all races and ethnicities. We’ll conclude with a thinking routine to give participants a voice to discuss their goals for incorporating their ideas into their existing work environments.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 204
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How is STEAM Education & Makerspaces essential in correcting the equation of participation for POCC in the sciences, technology and math?
    • What are possible ideas teachers and administrators can bring back to their classrooms to implement immediately to begin empowering students to engage in STEAM?
    • Why are POCC the lowest percentages of participants in STEAM education?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Diana Lockwood and Naimah Oladuwa-Frame, The Paideia School (GA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Making a Way Out of No Way: Creating a Professional Sisterhood On Demand E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: How do women of color who work in predominantly white independent schools do more than survive at the intersection of race, gender, and class? What is a professional sisterhood, and how can it provide the keys to a genuine sense of belonging in workspaces where marginalization and isolation are par for the course? Join several administrators as they discuss the challenges of navigating PWIs as women of color and the joy they have discovered through the creation of their own professional sisterhood. This interactive workshop will include strategies for identifying or creating professional sisterhoods that address the challenges of time and distance constraints and provide specific ideas on how to maintain authenticity and value in these networks.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 211
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are the components of a professional sisterhood, and how do I identify and establish a network that fits my needs, particularly as a woman of color?
    • Given the realities, for many women, of today’s personal and professional responsibilities, how can the members of the group maintain a reciprocal and equitable network of support through their professional sisterhood?
    • How can the individuals within the group successfully navigate unpredictable challenging group dynamics that may arise?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Anika Walker-Johnson, Germantown Academy (PA); Johara Tucker, Head-Royce School (CA); Lauren Lewis, Foxcroft School (VA); Therese Collins, Northfield Mount Hermon School (MA); LeRhonda Greats, Viewpoint School (CA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Token Hire or a Voice at the Table? #youngnumbandwoke On Demand F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: You are at the start of your career and at the beginning of developing your identity in an independent school: Who do you need to know, what do you need to know, and why do you need to know it? In this workshop, we will share our experiences as young teachers of color and reflect on what it means to be an authentic educator and emerging leader in a not-so-brown school. We invite you to explore where you are on your journey and what the path ahead may look like as you work toward your professional and personal goals.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 201
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Finding Your “People”: How can I build my internal and external network?
    • How do you advocate for your needs professionally and personally?
    • Do I have a responsibility to instill diverse practices if I am a visible representation of diversity in my school?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Kate Thomas, The Meadowbrook School of Weston (MA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Mind the Gap: Exploring Asian American Identity in the Racial Narrative On Demand F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Throughout history, Asian Americans have long suffered through marginalization in the racial narrative. Caught in between the polarity of civil rights issues in America and overlooked in the ongoing work around diversity, equity, and inclusion, Asian American students and faculty often find themselves fighting for voice and relevance as they seek inclusion in our schools. This session will delve into the history of Asians in America, their evolution and progress as a society, and what the future holds for them. It will touch on the intersections of culture, modern cultural appropriation, and the issues of identity that Asian Americans grapple with today. Attendees will leave with a greater understanding of their students and faculty and an empowerment to support Asian American inclusion in schools.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 204
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What's it like to be an Asian American throughout history and today?
    • Who are the Asian American students and faculty in our schools today?
    • How can we engage with and be more inclusive of the Asian American perspective in schools?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: John Yen, Polytechnic School (CA)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Expanding Affinity Potential: Affinity Groups in Elementary, Middle, and Early Childhood Education On Demand F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Though affinity groups have existed for decades in some schools, they are still a controversial topic in others. Even in places where they have existed, there is still annual clarification on the need and purpose of these groups. Conversations can become especially charged when we discuss this work with our younger students and their families. In this workshop, we will explore the development of affinity groups in multiple pre-K-8 schools. Learn the vital function these groups play for students, faculty, and families—even in schools serving the earliest grades. DEI position holders, teachers, administrators, extended-day/afterschool staff, and other members of the schoolhouse will enjoy exploring different models of how affinity work is implemented in six different school settings.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 211
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are some of the challenges schools face in creating and sustaining affinity groups?
    • What do affinity groups look like at different developmentally appropriate stages?
    • How do initiate the process of starting affinity groups? With administration? Community?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: James Greenwood, St. Paul’s School (NH); Jaleesa Anselm, Atrium School (MA); Tina Fox and Connie Yepez, The Park School (MA); Kerryn Hinds, Fayerweather Street School (MA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
We’re Still Here: Facilitating Difficult Dialogues That Include First Nations/Indigenous/Native Folx On Demand F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Conversations around how to engage in difficult dialogues around issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion have been going on for years, yet they often center around the experiences of black and brown folx and leave out other marginalized identities, such as Indigenous and Native peoples. Additionally, they do not often address the life experiences and vulnerabilities we bring to the table as we do this work and how these affect our ability to engage effectively. This workshop is intended to be a space where Native folx doing this work feel seen, heard, and validated, and where they have the opportunity to acknowledge what within us we bring to this work and how best to face and process experiences that trigger parts of our identities.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are some triggers specific to First Nations/Native Folx that make this work challenging or harmful?
    • Why are these statements, interactions, or experiences so triggering?
    • How can we recognize and respond to these triggers in order to keep doing the work?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Lizz Albany, Charles River School (MA); Shanelle Henry, Greens Farms Academy (CT)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Racism in Children’s Music: Practical Steps for Liberating Music for the Black Child On Demand F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Children in the black community are being musically neglected and ignored. This is because there is no national children’s music programming in our community. Our children are forced to listen to inappropriate adult music, which has a negative impact on their social, cultural, and academic development. The presenter calls this “music adultification.” This workshop will explore the history of racism in children’s music, how popular nursery rhymes continue to be used to reinforce inferiority complexes in children, and the cultural appropriation of African music in popular children’s movies. It will highlight the award-winning teaching artists of color who are creating culturally relevant music for children. Participants will leave with practical solutions/resources to help parents, teachers, and guardians take back control of their children’s music-listening experience.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How to provide Black children with age and culturally appropriate children's music of different genres beyond the mainstream?
    • Are there nursery rhymes in which I should not be allowing my children to hear?
    • Are there any children’s music radio stations that cater to the Black community?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Devin Walker, The Uncle Devin Show LLC
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit