Workshops

Below you will find a listing of all general conference workshops and Equity Seminars. Please note that Equity Seminars, offered only on Monday, November 30, and Tuesday, December 1, require pre-registration and an extra fee to attend.

With your conference registration, you have access to ALL general conference workshops. They do not require additional registration. 

 

On Demand workshops are asynchronous and can be taken at any time; all other general conference workshops have a specific time. All times Eastern.

Click or tap on a workshop to get expanded details, including the workshop summary, presenters, and more. You can search and sort this list to find what you're looking for.

Title Block Time Summary Track
“But I Have So Many Feelings!”: Memes As a Language of Self-Realization for APIDA Students On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Feeling sad? There’s a meme for that. Feeling misunderstood? There’s a meme for that. This workshop will examine the new language that students are already quite fluent in: Memes. By constructing and deconstructing memes that, in fact, explore and express complex topics, students engage in critical thinking, work around building self-identity, and engage in “academic” discourse. How do we capitalize on this phenomenon? As a case study, we will examine how students of APIDA heritage use this new language as a way to access and develop self-identity. Together, we will deconstruct a few memes, discuss how this could be used as conversation starters in affinity settings, and give you a tool kit to use in various settings with students.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What’s in a meme, and how does this medium function as a tool inviting honest and novel discussion among today’s youth?
    • How do meme pages/virtual settings affect self-esteem and identity development, specifically in Asian American groups?
    • What opportunities might educators have to encourage openness and deeper thinking in affinity spaces using memes as a conversation starter?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Woojin Kim, Flint Hill School (VA); Yulie Lee, Moses Brown School (RI);
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
1620-2020: Decolonizing Learning and Moving Beyond Land Recognitions On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: In 1620, the Pilgrims arrived on Wampanoag homeland and were granted a 50-year peace treaty. In the 400 years that have followed, the Wampanoag people and indigenous people all over this continent have survived countless acts of systematic physical and spiritual violence. Today, Native Americans are often left out of school curriculum and programming (beyond a couple of fall holidays), a further act of systemic, psychological violence and erasure. The presenters of this workshop, Wampanoag tribal members with experience in creating affinity space, will discuss ways of acknowledging indigenous communities and cultures in school programming and of supporting Native American students on our campuses. Learn to shape "new destinies" for indigenous people and independent schools through large and small group discussion and idea exchange.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can indigenous stories (past and present) be celebrated in curriculum beyond Columbus and Thanksgiving?
    • How can schools acknowledge, celebrate, and give back to the indigenous communities whose lands they occupy?
    • How can educators provide support and affinity space for indigenous students (no matter how large the school's Native population)?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Stephanie Harris, Ethical Culture Fieldston School (NY); Jordan Clark, Cambridge School of Weston (MA);
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
A Dream Preferred: Educating a Generation of Compassionate Social Justice Advocates On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: How can educators in independent schools liberate young individuals through the pursuit of justice, equity, and opportunity? How can we create and sustain an intellectual habitat—driven by authentic diversity—that helps raise generations of powerfully compassionate advocates who ultimately disrupt systems that produce inequality and build a more just future? Join us and explore how New Roads School is actualizing the transformative potential of diversity to build and sustain an integrative and respectful culture that appreciates, embraces, and leverages the unique attributes, experiences, and backgrounds of each person in our community. Learn how your school can transform its educational climate and help students as well as adults learn about the rich complexity of the human experience, nourish their capacity for empathy, expand their perspectives, and serve the common good.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do you educate authentically diverse young people to reach their full human potential?
    • How do you leverage the academic and social benefits of diversity to prepare students with the skills they need for the future?
    • How do you deal with the messiness of managing an authentically diverse culture that embraces the full spectrum of humanity?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Luthern Williams, Mark Vickers-Willis, Mario Johonson, New Roads School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Been There, Done That, What's Next? Updating Your DEI Tool Kit! On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Well, you have done the speaker and small group discussion thing, you’ve done the send a couple of people to PoCC and tell us what they learned thing, and you’ve done the let’s-assess-the-community-and-see-what-that-tells-us thing, and you seem to be in the same place you were when you started this DEI thing. Been there, done that, what’s next? How do we move the needle on this work, so it is truly making an impact on our school community? Join this conversation to learn more about using cultural competency assessment (Intercultural Development Inventory) in conjunction with professional development—formulating equity and inclusion learning groups—to move your community toward intentional and meaningful DEI work for the faculty and staff that elevates the impact on students.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What does a cultural competency assessment look like in a school that has been doing DEI work?
    • What can evolving DEI practice look like?
    • How do I get more folks involved and connected to DEI work in my community?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Erica Moore, Brian Thomas, MICDS - Mary Institute and St. Louis Country Day School (MO);
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Beyond the Binary: Building Supportive School Environments for Gender Non-Conforming and Trans* Students On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: In the United States, more and more children are identifying under the trans* umbrella during their school years. Creating safe educational environments is imperative to their emotional, social, and academic development. How do we, as educators, best support our gender-nonconforming and trans students? In this workshop, our group of trans/non-binary identifying presenters will facilitate an honest discussion about gender: what we know, what we think, and what we question. We will dive into the implications of enforcing gender binary systems within our classrooms and professional spaces, and consider how gender affects our students and families within their cultural contexts. Participants will leave with ideas of how to make more intentional decisions about gender in their classrooms, schools, and communities.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Why is it important to consider the implications of gender in school settings?
    • How can you approach communications with families regarding gender?
    • How can you provide a supportive school environment for gender-nonconforming and trans* students?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Van Nguyen, Friends Community School (MD); Selina Policar, King School (CT); PB Gutierrez, Children's Day School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Dear White People at PoCC: The Hidden Curriculum On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: There exists a discourse at PoCC as to whether people who identify as white should be at the conference. While this is still unresolved, it is important for white people who are currently at the 2020 PoCC to understand how their whiteness shows up at PoCC and the impact of whiteness in sessions, in the hallways, in the community, and in discussion groups. This workshop approaches the understanding that white people who have not interrogated their whiteness will cause harm at PoCC. Join us for this interactive workshop that compassionately—and critically—engages with white participants who must intentionally engage with the hidden curriculum at PoCC in order to dismantle harm, oppression, and bias at PoCC and beyond.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How is the discourse of white people at PoCC historically situated?
    • How do some people of color experience the participation of white colleagues at PoCC?
    • How might white folks at PoCC contribute to a supportive environment at the conference?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Liza Talusan, LT Coaching and Consulting LLC;
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
If You Host It, Will They Come? Creating Your Own Diversity Career Fair On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Studies have shown that in order to bring a more diverse faculty into independent schools, it takes more intentional time and effort. After six (mostly) successful diversity career fairs hosted by a consortium of schools, we have learned through trial and error what works best, what we can control, and what we cannot. Many faculty of color aren’t familiar with independent schools or their hiring processes, so we include seminars during the fair for them to learn more about our schools as well as the recruiting process. Leave the workshop with practical planning steps for enacting new structures that ensure access and equity in the hiring system.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do we create a system for candidates from diverse backgrounds to gain equitable access to hiring in independent schools?
    • How do we create a recruitment system to consistently attract candidates from underrepresented groups who may not be aware of the opportunities at independent schools?
    • What are emergent practices for developing inclusive, bias-free hiring protocols?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Erica Coffey, Collegiate School (VA); Joel Sohn, University Prep (WA); Mia Burton, Flint Hill School (VA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Integrated Schools: Crossroads of Trauma and Healing On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: The scourge of racism in our country has resulted in deep and lasting division and trauma. Richard Rothstein traces housing, wealth distribution and the achievement gap back to the de jure discriminatory practices of our government. As microcosms of a greater racialized system, integrated schools have the potential to compound racial trauma for all members of these communities. This workshop addresses the sources of racial conflict and trauma in integrated schools and presents opportunities for creating healing and hope. Presenters will share important developments in the field of neuroscience as well as mindfulness protocols and other strategies that have proven successful. School administrators, teachers, social workers, and counselors will tap into new ways to facilitate racial advocacy and healing.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What does neuroscience teach us about generational effects of racial trauma?
    • What are the various causes/sources of racial trauma in integrated schools?
    • How can educators modify the spaces in their purview toward greater racial equity and healing?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Sandra Soto, New York City Department of Education; Tessa Garnes-Beausejour, Private Practice;
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
It Takes a Village: Creating and Cultivating Brilliance and Black Boy Joy in PWIs On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: “It takes a village to raise a child.” While we agree with this familiar saying, we also recognize that, at times, it is necessary to first create the village. In that spirit, we founded an affinity group for young boys who identify as Black/African American based on the Nguni Bantu term, Ubuntu, meaning “humanity” and “I am because we are.” Ubuntu's purpose is to establish a community of support and create a safe space for the boys to authentically connect. We discuss topics such as the meaning and importance of Ubuntu and develop vision statements for how we want to spend our time together. Ubuntu identifies, encourages, and celebrates the brilliance in Black boys and grants permission to engage in unapologetic black boy joy.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are the unique experiences of Black/African American boys who attend predominantly white institutions?
    • Why is there a need for affinity groups (safe spaces) specifically for Black/African American boys who attend Predominantly White Institutions?
    • What are the benefits of creating/having such a group (not only for those involved but also for the entire school community)?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Mikael Yisrael, Abington Friends School (PA); Norman Bayard, Friends Select School (PA);
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Kids Aren't Too Young: Starting the Conversation & Learning About Race/Racism in the Classroom. On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: This workshop challenges the excuse many hear when exploring conversations with kids about race—they're too young to learn about and understand it. Sharing content taught to middle school students that focused on the social construct of race, historical context, systemic injustices and current events, this workshop interrogates the misconception while providing educators of all grades with discussion guidelines, curated essays, articles, statistics, research and activities to help students gain critical knowledge about racism. Participants can use these materials to facilitate class discussions alongside their own racial education and/or experiences. Sharing student reflections, educators will appreciate their capacity for this work and understand why it’s important to get students learning and discussing race/racism now. Anti-racism work isn’t easy, but it’s rewarding and imperative.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How should we define race and racism?
    • Why is discussing race and racism with students critical?
    • What can we learn about ourselves, and our students, when we discuss race and racism?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Leo Glaze, The Waverly School (CA);
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Mitigating Stereotype Threat in PK-12 Students On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Stereotype threat negatively impacts student outcomes, ranging from academic to athletic performance. Moreover, stereotype threat induces deleterious behaviors, including task avoidance, defensiveness, and over-efforting. Since stereotype threat is common in minority populations, educators should consider this insidious psychological phenomenon when undertaking diversity, equity, and inclusion work in independent schools. In this transformative workshop, participants will learn how to select, customize, implement, and evaluate scientific interventions that mitigate stereotype threat and improve student outcomes. Moreover, participants will apply their learnings in order to improve at least one area of practice, such as designing school environments, giving instructions for assignments, facilitating class discussions, or providing feedback on student work. This workshop will conclude with a distribution of valuable electronic resources that will help further the work.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How does stereotype threat impact student outcomes?
    • What environmental, social, and demographical cues activate stereotype threat?
    • What scientific interventions mitigate stereotype threat and improve student outcomes?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Julian McNeil, Teachers College, Columbia University (NY);
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Real Talk: Contextualizing Injustice With Students On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Talking with students about injustice can, at times, prove to be difficult; but these conversations must happen if students are to better understand themselves and the world around them. This workshop focuses on the facilitation of classroom discussions about injustices highlighted in curriculum, including historical events, literature, and current events. This workshop is intentionally interactive with participants engaging in pre-developed activities while also developing their own.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Where are the moments of injustice in the participants’ curriculum?
    • How do you develop lesson plans that intentionally address injustice highlighted in the curriculum and/or in current events?
    • How do you design activities that help to facilitate classroom discussion about injustice?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Stephanie Tellis, St. Andrew's Episcopal School (MD);
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Reflections on How to Be an Anti-Racist: Understanding and Practicing Kendi in Independent Schools On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: The opposite of “racist” isn’t “not racist." It is “anti-racist." What’s the difference? Ibram X. Kendi attempts to address this question in his thought-provoking book How to be an Anti-Racist. In this workshop, we will explore a summary of Kendi’s main and subsidiary points, and then discuss strategies for implementing them within an independent school context. Through presentation and discussion, we will share the structure of a professional development series using this book and guide participants in a discussion of how educators might apply these ideas to their lives at school and beyond.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What aspects of Kendi’s work are particularly insightful or under-appreciated in the diversity and inclusion community?
    • How can we better shape our school practices and policies to be actively anti-racist?
    • How can educators use Kendi's book, How to be an Anti-Racist, to guide professional development opportunities at their institutions?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: James Greenwood, Western Reserve Academy (OH); Scott Styles, St. Paul's School (NH);
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Running the (R.A.C.E.)2: Engaging White Colleagues in DEI Work to Transform an Independent School On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Maryvale Preparatory School is a predominantly white girls independent school located near Baltimore, Maryland. For years, the diversity work was too limited in scope and practice, causing traumatic experiences for many People of Color in the community. As the two sole Administrators of Color, we were left with the question, “How do we engage our white colleagues in DEI work?” We sought to elevate equity by putting race at the center of the conversation. Using the (R.A.C.E.)2 framework, we have established a multi-tiered approach to keeping the DEI initiative developing at our school. Participants will be exposed to strategies and possible pitfalls to shift school culture through the engagement of white colleagues.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do you move beyond random acts of equity to more substantial diversity work?
    • What institutional changes and programs need to be developed to support a functioning diversity program?
    • Why is DEI work not the sole responsibility of the people of color in the school?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Victor Shin, Kalea Selmon, Maryvale Preparatory School (MD);
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Say It Forward: Social Justice Storytelling and Oral History in the Classroom On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Voice of Witness (VOW) is a nonprofit organization that advances human rights by amplifying the voices of those most impacted by injustice. Our workshop explores the methodology of conducting oral history in classrooms and communities, a process that puts students’ experiences and identities at the center of curriculum, as well as reading and experiencing the narratives of others. Oral history projects create more equitable models for teaching and learning and make space for students to see themselves and their communities as participants in history. In this hands-on workshop, teachers and community leaders will explore VOW's ethics-driven methodology: creating a brave space for sharing stories, using listening as a powerful tool for empathy, and developing communication and critical thinking skills.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do we amplify unheard voices in our classrooms and communities?
    • How do we ethically collect stories from each other and our communities?
    • How does oral history develop empathy within the classroom?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Erin Vong, Voice of Witness;
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
The Life Navigator Middle School Program to Promote Social and Economic Mobility On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Recent research indicates developing executive functioning skills is a more reliable predictor of success in academics and in life than IQ, test scores, or socio-economic status. Middle school is a critical time for building executive functioning skills. Over the past year, the Life Navigator Middle School Program launched in two socio-economically diverse middle schools in Charlotte, North Carolina. Weekly advisory sessions, coupled with school-wide faculty/staff training and family engagement, empower students to develop essential executive functioning skills and life management tools, including setting goals, thinking flexibly, regulating emotions, understanding different points of view, staying focused and completing tasks, and developing a diverse peer network. When COVID-19 resulted in a pivot to remote learning, we continued programming through the Life Navigator Family Packet and virtual educational opportunities.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is the link between executive functioning and social and economic mobility?
    • How do we create school enviroments that support the skill-building needed for success beyond the classroom?
    • How do we effectively promote social capital development for students of color in independent schools?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Ana Homayoun, Luminaria Learning Solutions; Latoya Pousa, Charlotte Latin School (CA);
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
The Mission of Asians: “Quiet Observers.” Where Is My Voice? On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: In the United States, DEI work is based on white-Black history and dynamics. Recently, brown and indigenous people have begun finding their voices in relation to this established basis. Asians are typically expected to be “quiet observers.” They are often marginalized, as if they did not really exist, and their voices are not even counted as viable. What is their role in participating in diversity, equity, and inclusion work? What is needed for an Asian to be relevant within this firmly established, racially prejudiced dynamic? This workshop will help participants to articulate a mission, as outsiders, in the racial dynamics in this country. It will further suggest a path to finding their voices within private school environments.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is my role, as an Asian, within the dynamic of white, Black, brown, and indigeneous people in the US?
    • Why am I not understood by other races?
    • How can I strengthen the gift of being Asian?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Chiaki Uchiyama, Cedarwood Waldorf School (OR);
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
The Reading Quilt: Quality Multicultural Literature and the Classroom On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: American schools are experiencing a surge in ethnic and racial diversity. A tapestry of cultures, the classroom is fertile ground for multicultural materials that can decrease racism, increase cultural competency, and promote racial harmony to move toward a “multi-culturally literate” mindset. The group members will receive a peer-reviewed rubric that helps teachers and administrators distinguish quality multicultural literature from literature that may be biased. Using the idea of "universal themes," Dr. Rachel Slaughter shows teachers, librarians, and administrators how to substitute potentially biased books with quality literature that endorses the same themes. In the session, participants will receive a host of multicultural book titles as well as ideas on how to use multicultural literature to celebrate diversity and create relationships with students.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Using the peer-reviewed rubric, how can one find quality multicultural literature that is free of stereotypes and bias?
    • What are the reasons multicultural literature is not abundant in schools?
    • How can administrators, teachers, and librarians enhance the curriculum with literature that promotes multicultural education?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Rachel Slaughter, Literacy University (PA);
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Understanding the Racial Experience of International Students in the United States On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: It is important to keep in mind that every international student has their own unique journey and story, even when students come from the same countries or similar backgrounds. In the United States, there are socially constructed classifications to identify people by race and ethnicity. I have worked with many international students in different schools, and once they arrive to school, they are often viewed through the prism of American classifications. Students often come to the United States with certain standards, and after living in the United States for a long time, and being labeled, the experience can become jarring and alienating. We will analyze how to help the students understand how diversity, equity, and inclusion can help them improve their experience.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is the expectation of some of the international students when studying in America?
    • Why is it hard for the students to undertand diversity, equity, and inclusion?
    • How can we be more inclusive with the international students?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Katia Vargas, Kimberly Hogan, Connelly School of the Holy Child (MD);
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
What… No Diversity Director At Your PWI?! How To Build Collective Leadership As An Alternative On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: At a small progressive PS - 12 school lacking a Director of Diversity, we a small cadre of BIPOC educators are strategically disrupting the status quo of our predominantly white institution. In this workshop, we will discuss how we have come together as a “cabal” employing alternative solutions to not only support each other, our students, staff, and parents, but to effect change in an institution that has yet to create an equitable, inclusive, and just culture. The theme that permeates and drives our work is: why should a student of color attend our school?
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do we direct [introduce and executive] our initiatives as a BIPOC "cabal" when in committee work with the larger faculty?
    • How can BIPOC educators navigate white fragility as they attempt to bring greater diversity, equity, and inclusion to PWI?
    • Lacking designated leadership for DEI, how can a group of dedicated faculty and staff effect change in a PWI?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Susan Hendricks, Bennel Thompkins, Leo Glazé, Paul Nam; The Waverly School (CA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Who Is a Changemaker: Drama As a Vehicle for Diversity Education in Early Childhood On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Developing and implementing diversity curriculum can be challenging for young children. In early childhood, drama may be an ideal vehicle for diversity curriculum. It not only is a way to celebrate traditions, but it often shapes student perspectives of the world, and it offers an opportunity and platform for students to share their unique truths. Classroom and school performances, sometimes driven by school "traditions," may not reflect the lived experiences of its changing student body. The drama curriculum can be an opportunity to engage teachers in meaningful collaboration and develop and execute diversity-centered curriculum. This session examines one school's use of drama to both re-shape long-standing traditions and elevate student voices around equity and social justice for children in preschool through sixth grade.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do you engage children in equity and inclusion curriculum in the early years?
    • How do you address long-standing school traditions that may not reflect the lived experiences of its students in the curriculum?
    • How do we create a classroom environment where children feel encouraged to explore issues of diversity, equity, and social justice through play and the arts?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Jonelle Harris, Alissa Rowan, Community School (MO);
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Why Aren’t Our Black Students Going Abroad?: Navigating Anti-Blackness Far From Home On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: Study abroad opportunities are increasingly important for our students both academically and professionally, ranging from foreign-language acquisition to the development of cultural competency. However, a mere 6 percent of U.S. students who study abroad are Black. This begs the question: Why aren’t our Black students going abroad, and does fear of anti-Blackness play a role in their decision? Using China as a case study, this workshop will draw from personal accounts, surveys, and interviews documenting a myriad of black experiences abroad, exploring the challenges of navigating one’s racialized identity out of the country and how to best prepare for the experience. Furthermore, in light of COVID-19, we will discuss how the pandemic may impact Black students' decision and ability to study abroad in the near future.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How have historical differences around immigration and forced migration in China and the U.S. resulted in different manifestations of race, otherness, and anti-Blackness in the two countries?
    • What tools can we provide our Black students to help them better navigate anti-Blackness abroad?
    • How do we anticipate COVID-19 will affect study abroad decisions for our Black students, and how will this impact their ability and desire to go in the near future?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Amani Core, Kelicia Jessie, Phillips Academy (MA);
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Woke Is Not a Destination…How to Continue Ceing an Anti-Racist From Your Home! On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: "Woke is not a destination" is a saying that encompasses the idea that the journey of self-discovery that leads to awareness is one that never ends. It may take you two steps forward and one step back, but never under any circumstances are you to give up. In the era of COVID-19 and civil unrest, it is more imperative than ever that we continue on our journey. Folks will leave this workshop with skills on how to be an active anti-racist from home, skills on how to have difficult conversations about race, skills on how to take care of themselves during a national emergency, and skills on how to share these techniques and ideas with students.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is woke?
    • Why is it a journey and not a destination?
    • How do I continue on my journey during these uncertain times?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Micyelia Sanders, Michelle Holmes, Naadia Owens, Sharon Williams, The University of Chicago Laboratory Schools (IL)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Worldwide Imperative: Embracing, Cultivating, Promoting and Placing Women and People of Color Leaders On Demand On Demand -
  • Summary: In the midst of tumultuous and unprecedented times, independent school leadership and administrative searches continue worldwide. Join a quartet of veteran and successful former heads of color who seek to advance women and leaders of color for headship and leadership positions throughout the country and world. The four will offer a glimpse into their own struggles of leadership, offer what school leadership looks like today, outline current research and statistics, describe new protocols and practices for searches, and personalize discussion with examples of recent and successful searches using these new constructs. In a frank discussion, the presenters will also offer timely suggestions for an interactive experience with search committees and trustees; will outline essential candidate skills, qualifications and attributes; and welcome questions from attendees.
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What does effective leadership look like in independent schools?
    • What are the new protocols and practices used in successful head and administrative searches?
    • What do school leader candidates need to know and practice in these unprecedented times?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Tony Featherston, Doreen Nakahara Oleson, Jim Scott, Coreen Ruiz Hester, Resource Group 175
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Design the Impossible—Using Liberatory Design to Transform Systems of Power (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 30,
1:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: This seminar will introduce liberatory design as a means to create transformational change. Many core issues of inequity are about access to power—where you live, where you learn, whom you love, and the color of your skin all inform how much access you have to power. Participants will begin to develop “power literacy” by using systems thinking to better understand how power functions in our society. Through brainstorming and hands-on practice, we will utilize liberatory design practices and mindsets to consider how to redesign systems to redistribute power in schools, communities, and the nation. Our work will be fundamentally grounded in a mindset of joy, optimism, and liberation as we firmly believe that we must embody the world we seek to create.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 30, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full-Day Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Alegria Barclay and Angi Chau, The Nueva School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Do You See What I Mean? Facilitating Courageous Conversations Visually (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 30,
1:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: As educators and activists leading the work around diversity, equity, and inclusion in our schools, we are often called on to facilitate courageous conversations across identity, power, and difference. Though there are many dialogue models and tools, visuals can help set the stage, support thinking, and catalyze breakthroughs. Engage with veteran facilitators to learn common facilitation models, avoid pitfalls, and manage polarity. Learn visual facilitation strategies [O1] from experts to help people see issues and perspectives more clearly. This workshop will give participants an opportunity to unpack practical strategies for facilitating courageous conversations, practice facilitating, and leave with a visual toolset to deepen practice.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 30, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full-Day Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Kawai Lai, VizLit (CA); Rosetta Lee, Seattle Girls School (WA); Tamisha Williams, The Potomac School (VA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Resilience+Healing / Awareness+Accountability: A deep dive into implicit bias, racial anxiety, racial identity & microaggressions (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 30,
1:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: What could you do if you could see what’s not there? How much more powerfully could you engage oppressive forces and barriers to inclusion if you could recognize the seemingly “invisible” obstacles to equity and belonging in our schools and organizations? In this seminar, we will challenge ourselves by first examining the racial lens through which we experience the world. The facilitator will draw on cognitive science and real-life examples to demonstrate how unconscious phenomena linked to race—such as implicit bias and racial anxiety—impact us and influence the ways we change educational systems. We will then connect these phenomena to racial microaggressions that students and adults may experience, and we will practice responses that promote wellness for all community members. Participants will build concrete skills to navigate racialized experiences and strengthen their personal and institutional commitment to equity in policies and practices.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 30, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full-Day Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Sandra "Chap" Chapman and Jessica MacFarlane, Perception Institute
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Leadership Committed to Racial Equity, Not Rhetoric: Culturally Competence, Recruitment, Hiring, Retention and Accountability (Part 1) Equity Seminar Monday, November 30,
1:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: In this seminar, school leaders will explore ways their schools can build cultural competence and practice racial equity, community-building, and solidarity for social justice. In a real world shaped by COVID-19 and the continued sanctioned murder of people of color, this work in education is urgent. Any façade of “diversity” rhetoric must give way to effective practices and transformational change. This session will provide opportunities to identify, discuss, and adapt practices and methods for attracting and hiring the best culturally competent candidates, building meaningful inclusion in policy evolution, mentoring and retention, and moving the entire school in the direction of greater cultural competence and racial equity for all members of the school community.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 30, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full-Day Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Cristine Clifford Cullinan, ALiVE: Actual Leadership in Vital Equity; Amani Reed, The School at Columbia (NY); Emma Coddington, Willamette University (OR); Ruth Jurgensen, Prep for Prep (NY): Kalyan Balaven, The Athenian School (CA)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Grading for Equity: What It Is, Why It Matters, and How It Can Transform Schools Equity Seminar Monday, November 30,
1:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Despite our deepest commitment to equity and anti-racist teaching, many of our current grading practices are artifacts of the Industrial Revolution and actually undermine effective teaching and perpetuate achievement disparities. This interactive seminar will provide an overview of three aspects of grading: (1) the genesis of U.S. grading practices and the conflict with our beliefs about teaching, learning, and equity; (2) grading practices that are more accurate, bias-resistant, and motivational; (3) the quantitative and qualitative data describing how more equitable grading reduces achievement disparities, strengthens teacher-student relationships, motivates and empowers students, reduces stress, and aligns our grading practices with our social justice and educational purposes. Participants will learn how schools can develop a multistage and multipronged approach to implementing consistent and more equitable grading practices schoolwide.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 30, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Joe Feldman, Crescendo Education Group; Mark Boswell, Marin Country Day School (CA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Shaping Social Justice Champions: Designing A DEI-Focused Curriculum that Cultivates Activism and Community Leadership Equity Seminar Monday, November 30,
1:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: This seminar will guide participants through the development of a multidisciplinary, project-based curriculum that challenges students to apply skills they learn in the classroom to advocating for those oppressed by racism. First, we will explore how a school can collaborate with community stakeholders to identify a system that racially oppresses a group of people. We will then employ an academic and activist approach to deconstruct the social, educational, economic, and civic elements of the oppression and advocate for the oppressed. The seminar will approach the development of the curriculum from the perspectives of the administrator, specialized staff member, teacher, student, parent, and community stakeholder. Participants will complete this seminar with a plan for their school and community.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 30, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Mason West, Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School (GA)
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Designing Iterative, Interactive and Data-Informed Professional Development Experiences for Your School Equity Seminar Monday, November 30,
1:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: What happens when the experiences of students of color who are attending predominantly white independent schools lead to an interactive learning tool? Using their stories to direct skill development, participants will engage in an interactive, dynamic (Cards on Race) tool designed to help people of all levels examine race in a thoughtful, structured, and engaging way. Using this tool, participants will develop and strengthen racial literacy, empathy, and the healthy racial coping strategies needed to navigate our everyday world and our most challenging conversations about race. In addition, participants will be provided with professional development models to easily integrate into their school communities. This interactive tool can be used to enhance community-focused, data-informed professional development programming at the advisory, classroom, divisional, and institutional levels.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 30, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Liz Fernández, Ethical Culture Fieldston School (NY); Jackson Collins, Prep for Prep (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
FACTUALITY | An Interactive Crash Course on Structural Inequality, Intersectionality, & Empathy Equity Seminar Monday, November 30,
1:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: What if the opportunity to discuss inequality in America, with a focus on racism, was presented via an equally unconventional yet interactive and engaging platform? During this session, participants will be engaged in a facilitated dialogue, crash course, and interactive experience that simulates the experiences of diverse identities, by adhering to the following steps. Step 1. assume the identity of a character that differs from how you identify, which creates opportunities to empathize with differences Step 2. immerse yourself in a highly interactive simulation that explores advantages and limitations based on the intersection of your character's race, gender, sexual orientation, faith, class, age, and ability.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Monday, November 30, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Natalie Gillard, Factuality
Data Use in Activism: Evidence-based Equity and Justice Programming, Research and Evaluation
Design the Impossible—Using Liberatory Design to Transform Systems of Power (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, December 1,
1:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: This seminar will introduce liberatory design as a means to create transformational change. Many core issues of inequity are about access to power—where you live, where you learn, whom you love, and the color of your skin all inform how much access you have to power. Participants will begin to develop “power literacy” by using systems thinking to better understand how power functions in our society. Through brainstorming and hands-on practice, we will utilize liberatory design practices and mindsets to consider how to redesign systems to redistribute power in schools, communities, and the nation. Our work will be fundamentally grounded in a mindset of joy, optimism, and liberation as we firmly believe that we must embody the world we seek to create.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, December 1, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full-Day Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Alegria Barclay and Angi Chau, The Nueva School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Do You See What I Mean? Facilitating Courageous Conversations Visually (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, December 1,
1:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: As educators and activists leading the work around diversity, equity, and inclusion in our schools, we are often called on to facilitate courageous conversations across identity, power, and difference. Though there are many dialogue models and tools, visuals can help set the stage, support thinking, and catalyze breakthroughs. Engage with veteran facilitators to learn common facilitation models, avoid pitfalls, and manage polarity. Learn visual facilitation strategies [O1] from experts to help people see issues and perspectives more clearly. This workshop will give participants an opportunity to unpack practical strategies for facilitating courageous conversations, practice facilitating, and leave with a visual toolset to deepen practice.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, December 1, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full-Day Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Kawai Lai, VizLit (CA); Rosetta Lee, Seattle Girls School (WA); Tamisha Williams, The Potomac School (VA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Resilience+Healing / Awareness+Accountability: A deep dive into implicit bias, racial anxiety, racial identity & microaggressions (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, December 1,
1:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: What could you do if you could see what’s not there? How much more powerfully could you engage oppressive forces and barriers to inclusion if you could recognize the seemingly “invisible” obstacles to equity and belonging in our schools and organizations? In this seminar, we will challenge ourselves by first examining the racial lens through which we experience the world. The facilitator will draw on cognitive science and real-life examples to demonstrate how unconscious phenomena linked to race—such as implicit bias and racial anxiety—impact us and influence the ways we change educational systems. We will then connect these phenomena to racial microaggressions that students and adults may experience, and we will practice responses that promote wellness for all community members. Participants will build concrete skills to navigate racialized experiences and strengthen their personal and institutional commitment to equity in policies and practices.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, December 1, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full-Day Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Sandra "Chap" Chapman and Jessica MacFarlane, Perception Institute
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Leadership Committed to Racial Equity, Not Rhetoric: Culturally Competence, Recruitment, Hiring, Retention and Accountability (Part 2) Equity Seminar Tuesday, December 1,
1:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: In this seminar, school leaders will explore ways their schools can build cultural competence and practice racial equity, community-building, and solidarity for social justice. In a real world shaped by COVID-19 and the continued sanctioned murder of people of color, this work in education is urgent. Any façade of “diversity” rhetoric must give way to effective practices and transformational change. This session will provide opportunities to identify, discuss, and adapt practices and methods for attracting and hiring the best culturally competent candidates, building meaningful inclusion in policy evolution, mentoring and retention, and moving the entire school in the direction of greater cultural competence and racial equity for all members of the school community.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, December 1, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Full-Day Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Cristine Clifford Cullinan, ALiVE: Actual Leadership in Vital Equity; Amani Reed, The School at Columbia (NY); Emma Coddington, Willamette University (OR); Ruth Jurgensen, Prep for Prep (NY): Kalyan Balaven, The Athenian School (CA)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Challenging Cultures of Power to Choose Justice: A Hands-on Protocol Equity Seminar Tuesday, December 1,
1:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: In this seminar, participants will use a hands-on protocol based on Stuart Hall’s 1993 encoding/decoding theory and his definition of hegemonic viewpoints, in addition to the Maker-Centered Learning Framework (developed in 2016 by Clapp, Ross, Ryan, and Tishman) to nurture a more inclusive, equitable, just, and empowering classroom. Participants will use systems thinking to look critically at curricular content, explore its complexities, and find opportunities to enact change while bringing students’ perspectives and representation to the center of the learning process. Participants will walk away with a practical guide to adapt and facilitate the protocol in the classroom, teacher-training workshops, and other anti-racist teaching initiatives. The goal of the protocol is to facilitate learning that chooses justice.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, December 1, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Yerko Sepulveda-Larraguibel, Hawken School (OH)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Using Listening Circles to Amplify Marginalized Voices in Response to Racial Injustice Equity Seminar Tuesday, December 1,
1:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Building a healthy school climate and culture requires an effective set of practices and processes that immediately address racism when it occurs within a school-based community. In fact, being urgent, explicit, and intentional is essential to repairing harm and creating a safe learning and work environment. Listening Circles are an effective first step when an incident occurs that impacts the community-at-large. During this half-day seminar designed for educators, counselors, and administrators, participants will learn the history, rationale, structure, application, and facilitation of restorative Listening Circles. Learners will participate firsthand in examples of Listening Circles and walk away with a potent tool that can be applied immediately with faculty, staff, or students—virtually or in person—when the need arises.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, December 1, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Keith Hickman and Beth Smull, International Institute for Restorative Practices; Coy Dailey and Saara Mahjouri, Bank Street School for Children (NY); Javaid Khan, Horace Mann School (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Latinx Anti-Racist Action: Getting Aligned Equity Seminar Tuesday, December 1,
1:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: The Latinx community is a complex one. We embody a spectrum of racial phenotypes, and we originate from distinct histories, culture, and knowledge sets about race. For many, understanding American categories for race feels impossible. No matter our differences, many Latinx educators are opposed to racism, but many of us fall short in our capacity to challenge racism in our schools because of the gaps in our understanding about race, racism, and white supremacy. These gaps undermine our ability to serve the goal of PoC solidarity as colleagues and to upend racism in our schools. This Latinx affinity workshop will offer key intellectual takeaways for understanding white supremacy and its impact on community. Participants will develop skills to more effectively challenge racism and build greater solidarity in our schools.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, December 1, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Ramón Javier, Trinity School (NY); Eva Vega-Olds, The Town School (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Reconnect: Self Care as a Practice of Freedom Equity Seminar Tuesday, December 1,
1:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Every time a flight prepares to depart, the flight attendants complete their safety demonstration and remind us to “Place the oxygen mask on yourself first before assisting others in need.” This seminar is for the educator of color who gave her oxygen mask away and is now finding it hard to breathe. It is for the educator of color who is tired, scared, and feels alone yet continues to fight. This session is a reminder that there is no caring for them unless you are caring for yourself and no support for them unless there is support for yourself. Wondering if this seminar is for you? Ask yourself the question that Mary Oliver so beautifully posed, “Are you breathing just a little and calling it a life?”
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, December 1, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Tamara Pearson, Practice Freedom Project
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Despite Polarization, Skillfully Navigate Difference to Build Relationships, Shift Systems, and Lead for Justice Equity Seminar Tuesday, December 1,
1:00 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Independent schools are not sheltered from the polarization that divides the country and supports assimilation as opposed to justice and liberation. How, then, do diversity practitioners and school leaders intentionally leverage their communities’ diversity to live to, rather than aspire to, their school missions? How do they stay at the table with stated school values and include and engage the diversity of folks in their community—people with similar values but likely different translations of them, unique intersectional identities, different life experiences, and various political ideologies? How do they navigate effectively across cultural differences and varying levels of intercultural competence? Facilitators will use the Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity[O1] , somatic practices, and an adaptation of the Theatre of the Oppressed to help participants strategically address these questions.
  • Block: Equity Seminar (Tuesday, December 1, 1:00 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Category: Half-Day Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Marie Michael, The Blake School, Northrop Campus (Upper School) (MN); Scott Flemming, Global Academy (MN); Aamera Siddiqui, Exposed Brick Theater
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
“I’m NOT Too Young to Read This” - Literature: A Vehicle for Anti-Racism A Wednesday, December 2,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: Challenge your students to create new destinies through an interdisciplinary reading project we call Books Beyond Borders. Our supplementary activity, designed to enhance already full curriculums, builds community and fosters allies on campus. Learn how middle school English and history teachers and their librarian, using concepts of “windows, mirrors, and sliding doors,” collaborated to create brave spaces for critical dialogues about race, religion, gender/sexuality, etc. Build a rich learning environment to raise cultural awareness, broaden your students’ reading experiences, encourage majority students to open windows into the lives of people different from themselves, and provide students of color opportunities to delve deeply into positive representations of their identity and culture. Attendees will leave with resources to institute this project and suggestions for moving forward.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 2, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How to use literature to promote anti-racism and allyship?
    • How do we broaden students’ reading experiences?
    • How do we build collaborative professional relationships to expose students to new ideas and cultures?
  • Presenters: Lizzbeth Melendez, Viewpoint School (CA); Sonja Hayes, Greenhill School (TX); Monica Bullock, Charlotte Latin (NC);
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
#IAmNotAVirus: The Cost and “Benefit” of Assimilation for Asian Americans in the Age of Coronavirus A Wednesday, December 2,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: In addition to bringing economic instability, social isolation and political division, the novel coronavirus served as the impetus to an uptick in overt racism toward Asians/Asian Americans. While the experience of microaggressions is not foreign to these groups, the fear of violent macroaggressions has led to reflection and societal reevaluation for Asian Americans. Inspired by the presenters' own introspective experiences in this time, this workshop will lead participants through exercises and discussions that consider one of the reasons why the transition from micro- to macroaggressions is so jarring: assimilation. We will unpack the notion of assimilation in predominantly white institutions, documenting and considering personal experiences to move to a strategic mindset in the workplace. Participants can expect to engage in self-reflection and develop tangible strategies.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 2, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How has the coronavirus exposed the cost of the social survival tactic of assimilation for Asian Americans in and out of the classroom?
    • As educators of color, what role do our own personal identities play in disrupting hegemony within academic spaces?
    • By naming and exploring the process of assimilation as Asians in predominantly white spaces, how might we use our identities as “model minorities”/“well-assimilated” people of color to change/disrupt systems from within?
  • Presenters: Leela Woody, Mercersburg Academy (PA); Jenn Welch, Thayer Academy (MA); Peter Boskey, Concord Academy (MA);
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Colorism in the Latinx Community A Wednesday, December 2,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: Colorism is a term commonly used amongst people of color. But what does this look like in the Latinx community? In this workshop, we will discuss different instances of colorism from varying Latinx lenses. Attendees will explore their own experiences, look at case studies and walk away with strategies for addressing colorism when they witness it. By changing the narrative in their personal lives and in their schools, participants will be able to spread awareness and create a more equitable and inclusive environment for both educators and students.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 2, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is colorism, and how has it affected your identity or that of others in the Latinx community?
    • What strategies can we use to address colorism?
    • How can we spread awareness about colorism in the Latinx community in order to create a more equitable environment for educators and students in our school?
  • Presenters: Gabmara Álvarez-Spychalski, The Baldwin School (PA); Kerry Kettering-Goens, The Haverford School (PA);
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Data for Social Justice: Doing the Work Within Before Doing the Work A Wednesday, December 2,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: Data offers a powerful framework to expand our evidence-based understanding of policy choices and best practices in education. Widely considered as neutral and universal, there is a trust inherited in data, resulting in the popular adage, "the numbers don't lie." However, without a social justice lens, data can mask inequities, and often to the detriment of students of Color, as historical and current trends have shown. This workshop will introduce participants on how to engage data with that lens. In the end, this workshop will demystify the role of data in education and position it as a powerful tool to supporting our students succeed and uplift our communities.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 2, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What role can data play in promoting social justice in education?
    • How can educators develop an equity lens using data?
    • To what extent can we avoid perpetrating inequities despite best intentions?
  • Presenters: Juan G. Berumen, Lick-Wilmerding High School (CA);
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Real Talk: Sista to Sista A Wednesday, December 2,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: Oftentimes, Black women working in independent schools feel like they are in a hostile environment. Our daily realities can leave us stuck between a rock (microaggressions) and a hard place (gaslighting). This workshop holds space for you and other Black women who are facing these challenges head on to come together as a collective to support and uplift one another. We will unapologetically speak our truths, authentically connect with one another, and expand and cultivate healthy self-care practices.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 2, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What supports do Black women need in order to stay in independent schools?
    • What does a safe space for Black women in independent schools look like?
    • How can participants utilize this experience to help cultivate an organic network that supports the recruitment and, most importantly. the retention of Black women in independent schools?
  • Presenters: Stephanie Tellis, St. Andrew's Episcopal School (MD);
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Leading While Black and Male: Exploring the Lived Experiences of Black Male Heads of School A Wednesday, December 2,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: This workshop provides an opportunity for participants to explore the ways in which the racial identities and lived experiences of Black male heads of school inform their professional lives, leadership preparation, and leadership development. Through our collective exploration in the workshop, we will consider the range of strategies that these leaders develop to enable them to navigate the multi-dimensional aspects of their racial identity within a dominant white racialized education system. Additionally, the ways in which their articulation of action-oriented social justice leadership is influenced by their personal and professional lived experiences, leadership philosophies and values, commitment to students, and sense of community. We will strive to describe the essence of what it means to be a Black male school leader and head of school.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 2, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What does it mean to be a Black male school leader and head of school?
    • How do the politics of race, diversity, and social justice play out in the professional lives of Black male school leaders and heads of schools?
    • What are the key components in the creation of formal leadership development opportunities and networks to provide effective support and development for current and future Black leaders?
  • Presenters: Phillip A. Smith, Teachers College, Columbia University (NY);
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Mentorship in STEM Education: Mitigating Stereotype Threat Through Representation for the Underrepresented A Wednesday, December 2,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: The under-representation of students of color in STEM fields has led to a dangerous lack of representation in product design. If independent schools can help students develop careers in STEM, they can bring much-needed perspectives to the development of emerging technologies. In this workshop, faculty of color in STEM education will present a short video compilation of interviews with a cohort of students of color who excelled in STEM at their school. The faculty who worked with these students will offer examples of social justice STEM projects that are relevant to the identities and lived experiences of students of color.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 2, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can independent schools help students of color mitigate stereotype threat in STEM fields?
    • What can we learn from first-person narratives of students of color who have succeeded in STEM fields?
    • How might a social justice curriculum provide representation and relevance to students of color in STEM fields?
  • Presenters: Modupe Oshin, Zysnia Linger, Nina Yuen, Greens Farms Academy (CT);
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Road Map to Lower School Affinity Groups: Navigating Your School Culture on Your Journey to Realization! A Wednesday, December 2,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: So, how do you prepare and educate parents, faculty, and students to support Lower School affinity groups? Join us as we share our journey from research to realization. For students from minoritized communities in independent schools, affinity groups are often a lifeline in the development of positive identity. Research shows that affinity groups offer these students the opportunity to feel pride and confidence in their identities, build self-esteem, and bond with others who share those identities. Contrary to the popular concern that affinity groups promote segregation, we understand that they empower students to enter into a relationship with people who are different from them. It is clear to us that affinity groups, starting in Lower School, are essential to health and well-being in independent schools.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 2, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do you create a research-based PLC focused on the positive power of affinity groups in lower school?
    • How do you prepare and educate parents, students, and faculty to support lower school affinity groups? How do you answer the questions “Won’t this create segregation?” or “Aren’t lower school students too young for affinity groups?"
    • How do you tie affinity group work to the mission and institutional priorities of your school?
  • Presenters: Sherry Wells, Lucia Hassell, Melissa Brown, Holton-Arms School, Inc. (MD);
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
The Takeover: Creating “Blackspace” Where Black Children Are Valued in a Predominantly White School. A Wednesday, December 2,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: How do you create a space that takes over the narrative of Black experiences in WPIs? How do you take on a leadership role and use your voice to create the space our Black children need and deserve? In this workshop, you will hear the stories of how two Black faculty members took over their school's white spaces and changed the narrative. With the goal of opening up opportunities for Black children and families to be seen, heard, valued, and taken care of, the creation and intersection of two Black-centered movements changed the way Black children could show up at school with pride.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 2, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do you create a space that takes over the narrative of Black experiences in WPIs?
    • What tools/players are needed to grow your movement?
    • How do you use your school climate to your advantage when thinking about creating these Black spaces?
  • Presenters: Lauren Snelling, Tracy Aiden, The University of Chicago Laboratory Schools (IL);
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
When Your Family Tree Has Many Roots: Supporting Transracial Adoptees in Your Classroom and Communities A Wednesday, December 2,
12:45 PM-1:45 PM
  • Summary: Using personal narratives from panelists' own educational experiences and continued work in independent schools, participants will learn best practices for supporting transracial adoptee students, families, and teachers. Participants will engage in a hands-on activity and panel Q&A that will challenge them to tap into parts of everyday life of the Transracial Adoptee experience that are often invisible while at school or in the community. Upon leaving the workshop, participants will have reexamined the family tree project and “traditional” projects that happen throughout the grade levels in various subjects. Participants will become familiar with “Dos and Don’ts,” be equipped to integrate alternative ideas and practical lessons into their curriculum, and gain resources for engaging with TRAs in any setting: administration, admissions, the classroom, or extracurricular activities.
  • Block: A (Wednesday, December 2, 12:45 PM-1:45 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What subconscious blindspots may I carry about the experiences for our Transracial Adoptee students in my school (i.e., intersections of family, adoption, and race)?
    • How can I leverage my role at school in order to confront/interrogate my implicit biases that I hold about transracial adoptees and become a better ally and community change-agent for students and families who identify with transracial adoption?
    • How does this inform my practice, and what applicable steps can I take immediately?
  • Presenters: Elena Pereira, Charles River School (MA); Brad Belin, Berwick Academy (ME); Christina Ormrod Fox, The Park School (MA); Polly Williams, Cambridge Friends School (MA); Starleisha Gingrich, Lancaster Country Day School (PA);
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
‘I Don’t Need No DEI Stuff in Science!’ and Other Ridiculous Statements We Say/Hear B Wednesday, December 2,
2:15 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Most scientific narratives dismiss and ignore the connections between scientific pursuits, history, and hierarchy, thus perpetuating white patriarchal structures of power that do NOT serve diverse populations. The resulting opportunity and achievement gaps in STEM remain unaddressed as Black and brown students cannot find mentoring or space to develop their identity as scientists. It is critical to make DEI work part of science education. Inclusive instruction ensures that our kids see themselves as engaged and aware scientists and become champions of change. This interactive workshop seeks to disrupt the traditional role played by STEM education. We aim to offer a framework to build science practices through a social justice lens and to foster a dedicated community of science educators committed to this effort.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 2, 2:15 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How is science education relevant to DEI work, and why is it critical today and tomorrow?
    • What are the short- and long-term goals in promoting equity and social justice in science?
    • The pedagogy and assignment assessment: How do you develop STEM curriculum that inspires more than curiosity but actions of social justice?
  • Presenters: Peter Frank, Carolina Artacho Guerra, Phillips Academy (MA);
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Island Womxn Rise, Walang Makakatigil: Collectivist Cultural Approach For Healing, Sustaining, and Inspiring B Wednesday, December 2,
2:15 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Explore the Filipina/o/x collectivist cultural approach of Kapwa as a framework to disrupt Western individualistic thinking and to liberate justice-oriented, community-wide collaborative problem-solving. Kapwa, Tagalog for a shared sense of inner belonging, is a core Filipina/o/x pre-colonial value and a transformative catalyst that sparked a revolution. Inspired by the spirit of “walang makakatigil” (nothing can stop us) from the truth-to-power anthem titled “US” and the solidarity of Filipina/o/x MC’s (Ruby Ibarra, Klassy, Rocky Rivera, and Faith Santilla), Filipina/o/x educators will facilitate a collectivist analysis of how Kapwa can create more inclusive communities of belonging. Engage in breakout spaces reflecting on healing through inter-generational and cognitive approaches to social-emotional learning, visualizing systems of collectivist thinking, and examining community resources driving toward sustainable collectivist practices.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 2, 2:15 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is a Filipinx collectivist cultural approach of Kapwa, and why does it matter in a time of uncertainty?
    • How does a Filipinx collectivist cultural approach of Kapwa help heal, restore, renew, and create more inclusive communities of belonging?
    • What does Kapwa look like in mind, body, and soul, and how does it impact ways of thinking, support social-emotional well-being, and address the evolving nature and needs of pre-K-12 independent school communities?
  • Presenters: Maria Graciela Alcid, Buckingham Browne & Nichols School (MA); Justine Ang Fonte, The Dalton School (NY); Emilia Bautista King, Sidwell Friends School (DC); Reanne Young, The Roeper School (MI); Rochelle Reodica, Marin Horizon School (CA); Maria Paz Alegre, The Allen-Stevenson School (NY); Melissa Roja Lawlor, Brewster Academy (NH);
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
"Brown Skin Girl: When You’re in the Room, They Notice You"- Reclaiming Our Power B Wednesday, December 2,
2:15 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Beyoncé’s words speak to the heart of the experiences of women of color in independent schools. People notice us because of our excellence. However, our excellence is often viewed as threatening and intimidating to white mediocrity. As a result, women of color have been marginalized, abused, and maligned in our schools and beyond. Given this toxic environment, how do women of color survive—and thrive? Join us to learn concrete strategies to put our health first, take off the masks, and step into our full power. Participants will leave feeling affirmed, empowered and ready to walk in our greatness. Join us for an affirming, joyful and healing space in which to uncover who we really are beyond the multiple burdens of sexism, racism and other oppressions.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 2, 2:15 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What particular challenges do women of color face in independent schools?
    • What strategies can women of color use to thrive in cultures where their expertise and experience may not be valued?
    • How can women of color take the feeling of solidarity and connection they feel at PoCC home with them into their workplaces and communities?
  • Presenters: Toni Woodlon, Jessy Molina, Friends School of Baltimore (MD);
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
"What Am I Doing Here?"-The Value and Benefit of Educators of Color in Independent Schools B Wednesday, December 2,
2:15 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: This workshop will address the exceptional value and benefit of teachers and administrators of color in the independent school environment. Our broad perspectives, heightened awareness, and unique personal experiences accentuate our teaching and relationships, greatly enhancing our school communities. In this workshop, we’ll discuss the "guilt" that is sometimes felt and fostered by teachers of color in schools like ours, where typically student and faculty diversity is minimal or in transition. The questions asked by others (and perhaps ourselves) can often be, "Why aren't you working with children who 'need' you; giving back to your own?” We’ll address the vital roles that educators of color play as prime examples of expert professionals with resources and consciousness that our students may not otherwise experience without us.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 2, 2:15 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What special value do you bring to your school environment as an educator of color?
    • How do your students, families, and colleagues benefit from your perspective and experience?
    • What are some of the needs that you fulfill as an educator for children of perceived privilege?
  • Presenters: Angela Fisher, Beverly Sotelo, Alta Vista School (CA);
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Cross-Stitch Leadership: Creating Together by Bridging the Distance B Wednesday, December 2,
2:15 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Cross-stitch leadership is the belief that our work is stronger when we operate in community and co-create across, and in spite of, physical boundaries. We are a group of women leaders from under-represented backgrounds who have found and amplified each other through intentional connection and honest encouragement. No woman should feel alone in this difficult yet rewarding work of leadership, regardless of circumstance. We will share the protocols and tools we use to stay connected, how we adapt our practices to changing circumstances, and the power of having a personal “board of trustees.”
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 2, 2:15 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can you employ cross-stitch leadership to enhance your leadership skills?
    • What protocols and tools are effective in creating community?
    • Why is a “personal board of trustees” so important?
  • Presenters: Tamisha Williams, Juna McDaid, The Potomac School (VA); Lori Cohen, Bright Morning Consulting; Shoba Farrell, San Francisco University High School (CA);
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Fostering Positive Identities in Our Children to Cultivate Young Anti-Racists B Wednesday, December 2,
2:15 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Each year our youngest children enter our classrooms with curiosity and questions. How might we access their curiosity to help them understand and dismantle racialized systems? In this workshop, we will offer an opportunity to look at one educator’s journey with her class to find patterns and systems of inequity. Then we will widen our lens to examine the actions parents, groups within the school, and external organizations can take to support positive identity development in children and their growth as anti-racists. People will leave this workshop with a rationale for anti-racist education at the lower school or elementary school level and ideas and strategies for working with our children.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 2, 2:15 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How might we practically apply the research about positive identity development in elementary school classrooms?
    • How might we leverage current research to provide rationale for leveraging parent involvement in anti-racist work?
    • What connections can be made between anti-racist education and our missions as independent schools?
  • Presenters: Dori King, Suzanne Lee, Oregon Episcopal School (OR);
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Never Too Young for Justice: Building Conscious, Equitable, Loving Community in Preschool-3rd Grade Classrooms B Wednesday, December 2,
2:15 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: "Children as young as two years old use race to reason about people's behaviors." (Hirschfeld, 2008) Children are swimming in the waters of systemic racism before they are even born and quickly begin experiencing and observing its symptoms. By the time they arrive in our preschools and kindergartens, they have lots to unpack! We can gently give them context and tools to discuss and transform it. In this workshop, we will share research and a participatory sequence of our songs as primers for discussion and resource sharing among attendees about developmentally appropriate dialogue and action in the classroom for racial justice. We will end by writing a full-group song with a process teachers can emulate in their classrooms. Bring your voice and dancing shoes...
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 2, 2:15 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do I talk with the youngest members of my school community and their families about race, justice, and equity?
    • What key themes and language can I build my DEI curriculum map around for young learners?
    • How can music powerfully compliment and support students in this important work and help extend these conversations into my students' homes?
  • Presenters: David Stills, CityLove; Brian Caselli Jordan, City Love/The Philadelphia School (PA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Set Up to Fail?: Red Flags for DEI Professionals Working for Institutional Change B Wednesday, December 2,
2:15 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Independent schools have a range of interests in supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). Some schools are focused on representation (diversity) while others are focused on sense of belonging (inclusion). However, how are schools addressing the real work that comes along with disrupting power and access (equity)? What are the red flags that DEI practitioners should look for in the leadership, community, and practices that say they are ready for equity? What do you do when there are conflicting messages about your role or the purpose of your position? Join Dr. Liza Talusan and Dr. Keith Hinderlie, two experienced DEI professionals and scholars, as they work through institutional and individual frameworks for assessing and addressing red flags in DEI positions.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 2, 2:15 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What characteristics support institutional readiness for a senior position in diversity, equity, and inclusion?
    • What are the institutional practices, resources and commitments that allow a DEI leader to be successful and thrive within the organization?
    • What is the risk threshold for a senior administrative position in diversity, equity, and inclusion?
  • Presenters: Liza Talusan, LT Coaching and Consulting, LLC; Keith Hinderlie, Keith Hinderlie and Associates LLC;
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Why Equitable Grading Is Critical to Anti-Racist Schooling B Wednesday, December 2,
2:15 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Despite our deepest commitment to equity and anti-racist teaching, many of our current grading practices perpetuate achievement disparities. This interactive workshop will provide 1) An analysis of current grading practices and how those practices support racist beliefs; 2) a sampling of grading practices that are more accurate, bias-resistant, and motivational; and 3) a case study of one school’s approach to making grading more equitable and consistent across all grade levels and disciplines—its successes and struggles, The workshop will integrate research, stories, and history, as well as provide opportunities for participants to engage with each other and ask questions of the presenters in order to deepen their understanding, commitment, and confidence to make grading more equitable in their schools and classrooms.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 2, 2:15 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is the genesis of common grading practices, and what is the conflict between those practices and our contemporary beliefs about teaching, learning, and equity?
    • What are some specific equitable grading practices, and what does the evidence show about the impact of these practices on student-teacher relationships, student achievement, stress, motivation, and student empowerment, specifically among historically underserved student groups?
    • What are possible strategies to make grading more equitable at my school?
  • Presenters: Joe Feldman, Crescendo Education Group; Debby Previna, Georgetown Day School (DC);
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
You Are Not Alone: Experiences of Discrimination and Microaggressions Toward WOC Heads of NAIS Schools B Wednesday, December 2,
2:15 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Women of color in independent school headships have powerful implications for future generations of children. This workshop presents the findings from a phenomenological qualitative study of the lived experiences of twelve women of color currently serving in NAIS headships. Particular attention was paid to how race and gender impacted WOC heads' interactions with stakeholders including students, faculty, staff, parents, and the board of trustee members. Five key themes will be explored in depth: the need for self-advocacy, interplay with White constituents, pressures to calibrate mannerisms to meet a (white) norm, pride and joy of being a trailblazer, and unique obligations to families of color.
  • Block: B (Wednesday, December 2, 2:15 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are the daily experiences of woman of color (WOC) heads of schools?
    • What implications do race and gender have on the way WOC believe they are perceived as leaders of independent schools by stakeholders [board of trustees; faculty, staff, and administration; parents; students]?
    • What can the next generation of leaders learn from the trailblazers?
  • Presenters: Lora McManus, Blake School (MN); Karen Eshoo, King School (CT); Brenda Crawley, Plymouth Meeting Friends School (PA);
Data Use in Activism: Evidence-based Equity and Justice Programming, Research and Evaluation
Keeping Race and Equity at the Center in the Time of COVID-19: Networks and Opportunities C Thursday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: In the midst of the pandemic, it has been hard to keep a focus on race and equity in schools. And yet in this time of destruction of our very notion of what it means to be a teacher, of how we do school, we face a great opportunity to dismantle racism. Post-COVID schooling will be taking many different forms—and offers clear opportunities to keep RACE at the center and equity at the core of our work. Starting with the power of cross-country, cross-national networks to support PoC as they push their primarily white institutions to restructure with equity in mind, we will explore ways that education leaders have been able to plan for and support cycles of change for their schools.
  • Block: C (Thursday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can schools and leaders use the lessons learned during this time of school disruption to more equitably create systems that support belongingness and inclusion of students of color?
    • What role can loose networks play in supporting divergent thinking among formal and informal leaders across local, state and national levels and across independent, charter and public schools?
    • What are innovative leaders doing now to keep RACE at the center of their school’s efforts, and how can leaders at all levels keep this conversation on the table?
  • Presenters: Mary Antón, Learning.Leading.Becoming - Equity Leadership Consulting; Tamisha Williams, The Potomac School (VA);
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Applying Science to Foster Resilience: The COVID-19 Pandemic and Interventions for Students of Color C Thursday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: Widespread reports indicate that the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic is disproportionately affecting people of color, with discrimination against all groups—Blacks, Latinx, and Asians—as well as increased xenophobia expressed to Asians. For all students of color, these adversities carry long-term consequences for learning as well as mental health; these must be addressed proactively toward maximizing well-being. Authentic Connections will describe findings from cutting-edge science on resilience, presenting findings on over 3,000 independent school students of color. All assessments occurred since school closures in Spring 2020, and captured (a) the specific modifiable factors most strongly associated with positive outcomes among these youth, along with (b) specific directions that school administrators should prioritize in interventions benefiting students of color.
  • Block: C (Thursday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Since COVID-19, what are the rates of clinically significant depression and anxiety among different groups of youth of color—Blacks, Latinx, and Asians—versus whites, and how do they compare with rates documented on the same symptoms in 2019?
    • What are the major modifiable aspects of their environments that are most strongly associated with low distress among youth of color, and are there any noteworthy differences in patterns across different subgroups of racial/ethnic minority groups?
    • Based on the findings, what are specific, actionable recommendations for school leaders?
  • Presenters: Suniya Luthar, Nina Kumar, Authentic Connections;
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
E(race)ure: Shining a Spotlight on the Multi-Racial, Multi-Ethnic Experience in Independent Schools C Thursday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: “Where does one culture begin and another end when they are housed in the same person?" -Nayatara Sahgal Multi-racial/ethnic individuals have beautiful ranging combinations and subtle nuances of difference that can make it difficult to find a sense of belonging. We will begin to unpack, respond to, and navigate this complex topic of multi-racial/ethnic identity. Looking one way but growing up another, code-switching and societal expectations are a heavy mental load for our students. How can we continue to foster more equitable environments and hold space for identity development in your “mixed” constituents? More and in greater numbers, multi-racial/ethnic students and educators are entering independent schools, and we will provide participants with tools to approach, guide, and support this journey of self-love.
  • Block: C (Thursday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can we ensure that our schools hold space for multi-racial/ethnic identity without erasure or pressure to “choose a side?”
    • How do we define and recognize multi-racial/ethnic identity in the historical and contemporary U.S.A. context, and how does it show up for first-gen and multi-gen students and educators?
    • How do we proactively work toward implicit and explicit representation of, affirmation for, and education about multi-racial/ethnic peoples in our schools?
  • Presenters: Regina Hardatt, Avenues: The World School (NY); Naledi Semela, Prep for Prep; Ivy Alphonse-Crean, Collegiate School (NY); Rachel Lang, St. Luke's, (CT);
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
I Know It Can Be Scary: IIluminating Death and Grief: Practical Tools to Empower BIPOC Students C Thursday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Block: C (Thursday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Presenters: Mangda Sengvanhpheng, BACII;
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Importance of Science Educators to Mentor and Support Under-Represented & Low Socio-Economic Students In STEAM C Thursday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: As STEAM educators we must nurture, mentor, and support any student wanting to aspire to be an astronaut, engineer, scientist, or programmer. There is a difference in the number of students of color and low income versus Caucasian students attempting higher-level science, participating in research, joining STEAM-based teams or even trying higher level sciences. What can we do? Three words: opportunity, equity, and inclusion. We will focus on inclusive teaching and self-awareness, as well as develop strategies for recruiting and supporting marginalized students. Further, we will discuss the educator’s role in making materials, environment, and scheduled time accessible by all, accommodating varied familial and cultural demands.
  • Block: C (Thursday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do we develop inclusive teaching and self-awareness practices?
    • How can the educator make materials, environment, and schedule time accessible by all, accommodating varied familial and cultural demands?
    • How do we obtain opportunities to develop in STEAM for both teachers and students?
  • Presenters: Aidyl Gonzalez-Serricchio, Brentwood School (CA);
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Raising Black Sons C Thursday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: In light of recent events (e.g., the dog walker who called the police on a Black man bird-watching in Central Park dog and the recent killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police officers), the challenge of raising Black sons is arguably different than raising white children or even Black daughters. This conversation will be a sharing of these parents’ thoughts, worries and lessons they feel obligated to teach her their sons. These are conversations many of us would never contemplate but that obviously place a burden of decision-making on parents as well as their children. When do parents have these conversations and how do these conversations alter the innocence of their children?
  • Block: C (Thursday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What different lessons do parents of Black sons need to teach their children?
    • What fears do Black parents have for their sons’ educations and their futures beyond their K-12 educations?
    • What can white allies do or say to better understand or ease the journey of young Black males?
  • Presenters: Pamela Brown, Springside Chestnut Hill Academy (PA);
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Screens, Windows and Mirrors: Tools for Inquiry-Based Media Dissections C Thursday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: In this interactive course, we will explore the examination and creation of digital media as a catalyst to make thinking visible and engage in challenging or difficult conversations while teaching in person, online or, in a hybrid learning environment. Focusing on the use of photographs, video, and film, as creators or consumers, we will explore how to scaffold challenging conversations around inclusion, equity and social justice using inquiry-based thinking routines. We will examine commercial media, and we will scaffold the process of student-generated media. This course is useful for those who would like to use the consumption and/or the creation of media to make thinking visible as part of a culture of thinking and action around issues of inclusion, equity and social justice.
  • Block: C (Thursday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do I effectively use commercial media to seed deep conversation and learning in the areas of inclusion, equity, and social justice?
    • How do I effectively use student-generated media to seed deep conversation and learning in the areas of inclusion, equity, and social justice?
    • Why is it important to use thinking routines to dissect any media used in our learning environments?
  • Presenters: Kerri Redding, Washington International School (DC);
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
The Weight of Wearing Two Masks: Asian Americans, Coronavirus, and the Responsibility Behind an Asian Face C Thursday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: For many Asian Americans during the pandemic, wearing a face mask meant putting on protective gear that, ironically, would offer us no protection from “The Chinese Virus.” The Halo Effect has never worked in our favor. It is the cognitive bias suggesting that what is beautiful is good and is also referred to as the physical attractiveness stereotype. Beauty isn’t about taste but geopolitics, and there is a history of defining beauty and therefore attractiveness, familiarity, and trustworthiness that's centered on whiteness. And white supremacy solidified this by recruiting some of us to join them by calling us the model minority. That stops now. This session will equip attendees with uplifting and diverse examples of how we can gain control of our own narratives.
  • Block: C (Thursday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How does white supremacy persist within the Asian American community's definitions of beauty?
    • How are successful Asian Americans more influential than ever before?
    • How can we help our Asian American students see themselves in these powerful new narratives?
  • Presenters: Justine Ang Fonte, The Dalton School (NY);
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
What I Said and What I Meant: Cross-Cultural Communication C Thursday, December 3,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: Humans communicate on many levels: spoken language, tone, body language, style and personality. Our cultural identities and positions in society further increase the probability of miscommunications. Examine cross-cultural communication theories, ways that cultural values, power, and privilege affect the way we communicate; tools for questioning assumptions; and ways to improve cross-cultural communications skills. Participants can expect to 1) identify various dimensions of culture and how they influence our communication; 2) identify common pitfalls of cross-cultural communication that lead to conflict; and 3) learn competencies and gain tools for cross-cultural communication. The workshop will include presentations on theory and models, interactive and reflective activities, and several take-home tools for bringing back to school community and personal life.
  • Block: C (Thursday, December 3, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are various cultural ways people differ in communication, and how do these result in conflict?
    • What are various power dynamics that affect communication, and how do these result in conflict?
    • What are practical tools for minimizing and mitigating cross-cultural conflict?
  • Presenters: Rosetta Lee, Seattle Girls' School (WA);
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Conversations in Black and White: Building Trust, Honesty, and Dialogue in Independent Schools Confronting Truths D Friday, December 4,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: In this interactive workshop, participants will learn how to facilitate open and honest communication that builds a deeper understanding of our colleagues, students, and families. Our goal is to encourage self-reflection among our white counterparts, so we may unite and build greater awareness of ourselves and the world around us. We are teachers that have designed and implemented a series of techniques in our school that have guided and supported our teachers in reaching new levels of cultural competency. We recognize that many independent schools share our desire to become a more inclusive environment. Based on evaluations, we recognize that the techniques, lessons, and experiences we share are vital methods for creating a space where all people can be seen, heard, and valued.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 4, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do we create an environment where people feel safe to speak, share, and ask questions to help gain a deeper understanding of ones colleagues, students, and families?
    • How do we listen without judgment? How can we build trust and dialogue first, so truth and education can happen later?
    • How do we respond when someone asks/shares something that may initially make us feel uncomfortable?
  • Presenters: Rozlyn Humphrey, Avery Teichman, Charlotte Latin School (NC);
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Decolonizing the Curriculum: Asking Questions of Ourselves to Help Our Students D Friday, December 4,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: Many of the texts used in the humanities (history, English), and even the primary sources on which we base our courses, teem with the prejudices of their authors and echo the biases and oppression of their eras. How do we elucidate their deficiencies while maintaining a mission of social justice and clinging to an intellectual identity which values diversity and analysis? Interrogating the canon of literature used is a first step, but faculty also need to embrace a stance of asking questions of students, authors, texts and communities in order to avoid perpetuating systemic oppression by presenting these texts for their positive values without unveiling their destructive potential.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 4, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do we discover more diverse perspectives and texts?
    • How do we introduce more diverse perspectives and texts?
    • How do we create environments that engage students to value diverse perspectives and dismantle whiteness and patriarchy as the norm?
  • Presenters: Reynaldo Macias, St. Matthew's Parish School (CA);
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Empowering Within the Intersections: Workshop Utilizing Funds of Knowledge in the Classroom and Beyond D Friday, December 4,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: St. Louis native Maya Angelou said, “If you don’t like something, change it. If you can’t change it, change your attitude.” Answering her call, this seminar seeks to “flip the script” on how educators communicate, empathize, and work with students who are at the crossroads of intersecting identities. By situating ourselves within the intersections—holding space for our multiple identities—we can seek alternative possibilities for meaningful diversity, equity, and inclusion work. Under constant erasure from systems of oppression, POC have been deemed less than for speaking out in multiple languages, proudly identifying across the spectrums of gender and sexuality, braving the liminal spaces of migrant narratives. However, as we aim to demonstrate through activity-based learning, these become our sources of value, intelligence, and power.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 4, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What tools can we implement to strengthen school belonging for minoritized groups?
    • How can we transform our DEI practices from deficit-based to strength-based?
    • How do the theories of intersectionality and funds of knowledge inform student success?
  • Presenters: Joy Sevillano, Crossroads School for Arts & Sciences (CA); Lainey Sevillano, The University of Texas at Austin (TX); GJ Sevillano, George Washington University (DC)
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Justice Leads: DEI as the Basis for Strong and Effective Social-Emotional Learning D Friday, December 4,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: DEI and SEL programs are often seen and taught as separate bodies of work, although there is much overlap in their purpose, vision and core lessons. How do schools teach SEL without using a DEI lens? Research shows that even in schools that use formal SEL programs as its cornerstone, students of color continue to be negatively impacted. We see DEI and SEL as one, allowing educators to pursue a more intentional approach to understanding implicit bias—historical context in the realm of culturally responsive teaching. In schools that do not have a formalized program, we will workshop curriculum in order to see the “before and after” snapshot of DEI-SEL partnership. This way, we can truly continue the work in pursuing a “just” classroom.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 4, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can we critically look at formal SEL programs through a racial equity lens and prevent unintended negative consequences for students of color?
    • How can existing early childhood and lower school programs shift to encompass diverse, equitable, inclusive and social-emotional curricula to reach all learners?
    • What specific strategies can we use to adapt existing “one-size-fits-all” SEL programs to be more culturally responsive?
  • Presenters: Regina Hardatt, Cabrina Kang, Avenues: The World School (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Leveraging One's Occupational Privilege to Expand Equitable Programming D Friday, December 4,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: In independent schools, resources are accessible but widely underutilized by teachers of color. In this workshop, you will hear about the journey and process of two female educators of color of Caribbean heritage. We collaborated to leverage our positions as an established early childhood teacher and a computer science & robotics chair to build a robotics camp from the ground up on the island of Barbados. We will share how we channeled our passion for equity and access across divisions, campuses, and cultures into an annual free-to-attend inclusive camp. Through hands-on activities, discussions, student-volunteer and camper testimonials, we will ask participants to consider, “Are there nearby resources that I am not accessing that can be leveraged for others in need who are not in the space?”
  • Block: D (Friday, December 4, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can we as educators utilize school resources to enhance equitable programming beyond the confines of our schools?
    • How do we identify the “buy-in” factor that inspires others to engage in/support our programs?
    • In what ways can we hold true to the inclusivity we practice in our classrooms when we engage in programming in someone else’s community?
  • Presenters: Danah Screen, The Dalton School (NY); Samiyrah Kellman, Horace Mann School (NY);
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Removing Barriers & Building Trust with Families From Diverse Backgrounds: An Admissions Lens D Friday, December 4,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: This workshop will present solutions to support the recruitment of families from diverse backgrounds for organizations committed to educational access. The workshop uses the experiences of The TEAK Fellowship, a New York-based CBO, to identify unexpected barriers in the admissions recruitment process and provides several strategies to make the process more inclusive.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 4, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can schools and CBOs improve the recruitment of applicants from low-income, first-generation, and/or underrepresented backgrounds to their institutions?
    • What are the barriers that low-income families face in the process of applying to a school or college access program?
    • How might schools and organizations reflect on their own admissions practices to identify and dismantle inequities within their admissions processes?
  • Presenters: Danielle Holman, James Bravo, TEAK Fellowship;
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Resilience, Resistance and Rising Up: A Framework for Teaching Enslavement D Friday, December 4,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: Modeling multi-modal teaching practices, this workshop equips equity practitioners and division heads with resources that support teachers in engaging America's history of enslavement as both a content area and opportunity for social-emotional learning. By providing a methodological framework for teaching slavery that centers in the agency of the enslaved, this workshop will prepare school leaders to articulate the rationale and practical approaches to engaging enslavement to make humanities and social studies curricula more just and culturally responsive. Ultimately, workshop participants will leave understanding the essential nature of directly confronting the story of enslavement on every independent school campus and how facing this terrible foundation of the American story can offer insight into overcoming racism and classism while encouraging empathy over guilt and empowerment over shame.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 4, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do you engage the history of enslavement to promote empathy over guilt and empowerment over shame across students of any background?”
    • How do you equip educators with specific, culturally responsive content to use in classrooms?
    • How do you provide students from any background entry points and inspiration to make their campuses more just and equitable?
  • Presenters: Michael Molina, Bishop Walker School for Boys (DC); Jessy Molina, Molina Consulting (DC)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
The COVID-19 Pandemic From a Student Leadership Perspective D Friday, December 4,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: This session will pull the voices of minoritized and marginalized student leaders together from all over the country to offer their voice regarding the pandemic and the future of education. It will include practical advice from students on what they need from the adults in their lives to serve as leaders and in helping our country in the fight against COVID-19.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 4, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do I foster social-emotional support to students and staff?
    • What’s the student perspective on the future of education in light of COVID-19?
    • How do I rebuild school culture and community?
  • Presenters: Rob Evans, Hassani Scott, Independent School Alliance for Minority Affairs;
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Who Are You? Applying Critical Consciousness to Decolonize Minds and Reject Binary Approaches to Identity D Friday, December 4,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: In our conversations around race/identity, we tend to fall into binary patterns of thinking. What happens when we encounter or are people who don’t fit neatly into boxes? Or when one’s very existence blurs the lines between white and PoC? How can we decolonize our own minds around preconceived ideas about race to create more spaces in our consciousness and vocabulary in our language to allow multiracial and racially ambiguous people to step out of the borderlands and be bridges that transcend these divides? If we think about racial identity as more nuanced, how can we use these ideas to raise Critical Consciousness (capacity for social analysis; political agency; and social action) in our students and ourselves as we develop a language of critique?
  • Block: D (Friday, December 4, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Who defines identity, and how do we decolonize identity formation?
    • In what ways might our assumptions about racial phenotypes influence our interactions with multiracial or racially ambiguous students and colleagues?
    • How might we use the concepts of Critical Consciousness and Equity Agency to empower our students?
  • Presenters: Mary Antón, Learning.Leading.Becoming - Equity Leadership Consulting; Board of Directors, POCIS Nor Cal; Cathy Aragon, CATDC; Tanya Kaplow, San Francisco Day School (CA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Creative Healing: A Trauma-Informed Approach to Racial Equity Through the Arts D Friday, December 4,
12:15 PM-1:15 PM
  • Summary: Coming out of COVID-19, students and educators will need ways to process trauma and rebuild trust/connections among peers and colleagues when transitioning back into predominantly white spaces. This is a rare opportunity to use artistic modalities (beyond traditional means of writing and discussion) to help individuals and communities process acute, complex, and collective trauma. Participants will not only engage in simulations and exercises but be provided with developmentally appropriate strategies and a framework for creative trauma-informed care.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 4, 12:15 PM-1:15 PM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are specific types of trauma and the basics of trauma-informed care?
    • How can I facilitate healing of myself and others through the arts?
    • How does healing and trauma-informed care look different at different developmental stages/age groups?
  • Presenters: Brandi Hoyos, Mount Vernon Presbyterian School (GA); Matthew Neylon, Mount Vernon School (GA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit