Workshops

Below you will find a listing of all Equity Seminars and 75-minute conference workshops. Please note that Equity Seminars, offered only on Wednesday, December 4, require pre-registration and there is an extra fee to attend. All 75-minute workshops are available to conference registrants and do not require registration.

Click or tap on a workshop to get expanded details, including the workshop summary, presenters, and learning objectives.

You can search and sort this list to find what you're looking for.

Title Block Time Summary Track
ES01. Ally Is a Verb: The Role of White Educators at PoCC and Beyond Full-day Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
8:00 AM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: This seminar will help white educators strengthen their competencies in supporting equity and justice initiatives in schools. Focusing on the importance of white affinity work and the development of accountable cross-racial partnerships, participants will examine how they can deepen their understanding of race and racism, whiteness, and the potential for transformative pedagogy by working with each other to develop their identities as anti-racist educators. Participants will discuss the history of racism and its current manifestations in the U.S.; consider their roles at PoCC and beyond; explore why it is important for white educators to examine their own racial identity in order to be effective; and learn how they can support each other in their work to understand the impact of race/racism on their lives.
  • Block: Full-day Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 8:00 AM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 204
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Anshu Wahi, The Northwest School (WA); Elena Jaime, The Brick Church School (NY); Xiomara Hall, The Chapin School (NY); Hannah Lucal, Center for Racial Justice in Education (CRJE); Randy Clancy, Critical Analysis of Race in Learning and Education (CARLE)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
ES02. Connecting the Dots in Culturally Competent Leadership for Independent Schools: Climate, Recruitment, Hiring, Retention, and Accountability Full-day Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
8:00 AM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: The goal of this equity seminar for independent school heads, faculty, and administrative and staff leaders is to explore the need for cultural competence as a central organizing principle for increasing equity and meaningful inclusion for all members of your school community. This full-day session will provide opportunities to practice, discuss, and adapt practices and methods—from attracting candidates to hiring, mentoring, and retaining them—that move the school in the direction of greater cultural competence in policies and procedures, as well as curricular and pedagogical practices. To work with NAIS school leaders, we have assembled a group of culturally competent administrative and faculty leaders from both higher education and independent schools to explore what it means to be a culturally competent leader.
  • Block: Full-day Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 8:00 AM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 211
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Cris Clifford Cullinan, Actual Leadership in Vital Equity (ALiVE); Amani Reed, The School at Columbia University (NY); Emma Coddington, Willamette University; Ruth Jurgensen, The Francis W. Parker School (IL); Christopher West, Pasadena City College
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
ES03. Do You See What I Mean? Facilitating Courageous Conversations Visually Full-day Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
8:00 AM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: As educators and activists leading the work around diversity, equity, and inclusion in our schools, we are often called on to facilitate courageous conversations across identity, power, and difference. Although there are many dialogue models and tools, visuals can help set the stage, support thinking, and catalyze breakthroughs. Engage with veteran facilitators to learn common facilitation models, avoid pitfalls, and manage polarity. Learn how visual facilitation can help people see issues and perspectives more clearly. Through this workshop, participants will have an opportunity to unpack practical strategies for facilitating courageous conversations and will leave with a visual toolset to deepen their practice.
  • Block: Full-day Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 8:00 AM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 303
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Kawai Lai, VizLit; Rosetta Lee, Seattle Girls’ School (WA); Tamisha Williams, Lick-Wilmerding High School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
ES04. Examining Ourselves in Order to Be Culturally Responsive Educators and Create Inclusive Classrooms Full-day Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
8:00 AM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: What is culturally responsive teaching? In her book Culturally Responsive Teaching and the Brain: Promoting Authentic Engagement and Rigor Among Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students, Zaretta Hammond makes the case that educators need to teach all of their students to be complex thinkers and independent learners. To do so, all educators, regardless of race, need to hold their students to high academic and behavioral expectations, while building trust and rapport with them; however, this requires the teachers to do the “inside-out” work: “developing the right mindset, engaging in self-reflection, checking our implicit biases, practicing social-emotional awareness, and holding an inquiry stance regarding the impact of our interactions on students.” In other words, we have to change ourselves, not fix and change our students of color.
  • Block: Full-day Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 8:00 AM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 210
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Roslyn Benjamin, Live Oak School (CA); Paula Farmer, The Berkeley School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
The PoCC Leadership Institute for People of Color The PoCC Leadership Institute for People of Color Wednesday, December 4,
8:00 AM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Gain powerful strategies to advance to the next level of leadership while building your network of fellow leaders, mentors, and sponsors in this unique seminar tailored for people of color. The PoCC Leadership Institute offers state of-the-art leadership development tools and strategies including the Everything DiSC™ Work of Leaders Profile, a premier research-based skills inventory that provides you with a deeper understanding of your individual leadership strengths and style. The seminar format includes in-the-moment coaching, peer exchange, and post-institute follow-up, all in an encouraging atmosphere designed to nurture and propel a compelling vision for fulfilling your career goals. Through facilitated dialogue with education leaders, gain an inside view into critical moves for long-term professional and personal growth and success. Topics include working effectively with mentors and sponsors, evaluating your advocate in the search process, acquiring the critical skills heads of school and key leaders wish they had before assuming their positions, and developing professional growth plans. Get invited to a post-institute online leadership development and support community. Assess your conference experience in targeting workshops throughout PoCC. Build a cohort of colleagues, mentors, champions and sponsors to walk alongside you in your leadership journey.
  • Block: The PoCC Leadership Institute for People of Color (Wednesday, December 4, 8:00 AM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 201
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Nicole DuFauchard, The Advent School (MA); James Calleroz White, The Galloway School (GA)
ES06. Practicing Anti-Racist Leadership: Foundations, Strategies, and Skills for Personal, Professional, and Institutional Growth Full-day Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
8:00 AM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: This seminar is about practicing anti-racist leadership every day on the ground in schools. Because we can’t dismantle systems of oppression from arm’s length, we’ll start with ourselves: how we identify, how we show up in conversations and conflicts about race, and what work each of us has to do. We’ll use experience-based, everyday scenarios to talk about race and racism in our schools—not as “gotchas!” but to identify leadership’s responsibilities and opportunities. And we’ll explore how whiteness, despite increasing racial diversity in our communities, continues to define our schools’ cultures and outcomes. While our conversation will be informed by research, this is a head, heart, gut, and “what’re you gonna do?” working session. Because reading an article will only get you so far!
  • Block: Full-day Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 8:00 AM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2A
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Alison Park, Blink Consulting; Mitch Bostian, The Berkeley School (CA)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
ES07. Resilience+Healing / Awareness+Accountability: A Deep Dive Into Implicit Bias, Racial Anxiety, Racial Identity, and Microaggressions Full-day Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
8:00 AM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: This session will draw on cognitive science and real-life examples to demonstrate how unconscious phenomena linked to race—such as implicit bias and racial anxiety—can impact us as educators. It will also examine frameworks to deepen our understanding of racial identity and microaggressions. Through this seminar, you will more clearly recognize obstacles to equity and inclusion in our schools that are seemingly invisible, and you will gain concrete skills to navigate racialized experiences. In affinity and multiracial spaces, educators of color will gain resilience strategies, and white educators will build accountability mechanisms to apply personally and within independent schools. This seminar will be illuminating and collaborative as we support each other in developing necessary proficiencies to face these pressing challenges.
  • Block: Full-day Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 8:00 AM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 205
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Sandra Chapman, Consultant; Jessica MacFarlane, Perception Institute
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
ES08. Restorative Practices in Action Full-day Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
8:00 AM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: “How we do race will be consequential to the kind of society we have in the future. Our racing will be impacted by our history, our experience, as well as our imagined future.”—John A. Powell, Racing to Justice. Consider your plate and all its curriculums, protocols, and best ideas. What holds all the critical conversations together, so they are not just talk but functional elements of vital, sustainable communities? How do we foster a sense of belonging to build resilient relationships despite the anxieties of our complex racial relationships? We can use restorative practices to build, maintain, and restore healthy connection. Join this collaborative learning experience, and leverage your expertise to construct a school model for belonging. Spend the day considering how restorative practices support just and equitable independent school communities.
  • Block: Full-day Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 8:00 AM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 304
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Carla Young, Cranbrook Schools (MI); Bill Boyle, Transformative Engagement Solutions
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
ES09. Taking Care of Ourselves: Using Our Social and Emotional Intelligence to Thrive Full-day Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
8:00 AM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Today’s socio-political climate dictates the necessity for people of color to display unfathomable emotional control. The world expects us to display enough positive emotion to contribute to white people’s comfort, while also stifling our outrage at the modern-day lynchings happening on a daily basis. This not only requires us to have a clear understanding of who we are, how we feel, and how to manage our emotions; it also requires us to have empathy, social engagement, and ethical responsibility. Participants will learn about core competencies of social and emotional learning, take time to reflect on their own competencies, and practice skills to strengthen areas of weakness. They will also gain an understanding of their resilience and develop a plan for how to thrive in any environment.
  • Block: Full-day Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 8:00 AM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 308
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Keba Rogers, Trevor Day School (NY)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
CANCELED: ES11. Building Resilient Schools: Adverse Childhood Experiences, Racial Equity, and Trauma-Informed Practices AM Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
8:00 AM-12:00 PM
  • Summary: Participate in interactive activities to understand the importance of self-care for educators, and deepen your understanding of the impact of adverse childhood experiences and trauma. Gain tools to address cumulative and historical racial trauma, and be introduced to culturally responsive, trauma-informed interventions that foster resilience, socio-emotional development, and connection for students and educators.
  • Block: AM Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 8:00 AM-12:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 2
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Victoria Romero, Ricky Robertson, and Amber Warner, Corwin Press
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
ES12. Grading for Equity: How Traditional Grading Perpetuates Disparities, and What We Can Do About It AM Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
8:00 AM-12:00 PM
  • Summary: Dive deep into the history of our traditional grading practices, and recognize how our continued use of those practices undermines equity and perpetuates disparities. Learn specific grading practices that are more accurate, bias-resistant, and motivational, and discover the impact of those practices as shown by qualitative and quantitative evidence. Talk with colleagues to normalize struggles with grading, to construct meaning from the more equitable practices, and to generate ideas for bringing these practices to their classrooms and schools.
  • Block: AM Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 8:00 AM-12:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2B
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Joe Feldman, Crescendo Education Group
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
ES13. Ideas to Action: Strategic Planning to Meet Your Equity and Inclusion Goals AM Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
8:00 AM-12:00 PM
  • Summary: Schools do strategic planning all the time, but too often either the equity and inclusion leader isn't at the table or equity and inclusion aren’t mentioned in the plan. This session will provide some strategies for making sure that the school’s strategic plan includes diversity, equity, and inclusion AND that the DEI leaders on campus have their own road map for how the work will get done. In this session, we will also discuss how to communicate effectively with different constituency groups and how to do the work even when not everyone is 100% on board.
  • Block: AM Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 8:00 AM-12:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 310
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Stephanie Bramlett, Phillips Exeter Academy (NH)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
ES14. Our Liberation Is Connected: Thriving Together by Healing Racial Divides Between Communities of Color AM Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
8:00 AM-12:00 PM
  • Summary: This seminar will use racial identity development models to lead you through self-discovery and reflective exercises. You will have the opportunity to critique photos, quotes, and short film clips that reinforce AAPI and black stereotypes and to examine case studies centered on AAPI/black interactions and other communities of color—both positive and negative—to ground discussions and action planning. The seminar will also facilitate small-group discussions in affinity spaces.
  • Block: AM Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 8:00 AM-12:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 3
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Tinia Merriweather, Ethical Culture Fieldston School (NY); Rochelle Reodica and Jacqueline Kurzer, Marin Horizon School (CA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
CANCELED: ES16. Understanding, Respecting, Connecting: A Guide for White Women Teaching Black Boys AM Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
8:00 AM-12:00 PM
  • Summary: The seminar is based on information from The Guide for White Women Who Teach Black Boys and includes content and activities from three key areas: understanding, respecting, and connecting. You will engage in concentrated, focused inquiry around your relationships with black male students and the impact of those relationships on academic excellence, race, racism, privilege, and white supremacy.
  • Block: AM Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 8:00 AM-12:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 5
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Eddie Moore Jr., The Privilege Institute
ES17. You’re Not Crazy, You’re Not Alone: Resiliency in the Face of Implicit Bias, Microaggressions, and Everyday Racism AM Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
8:00 AM-12:00 PM
  • Summary: In this holistic experience, educators will develop shareable self-care techniques for lessening the negative effects of microaggressions (MA), implicit bias (IB), and everyday racism (ER). You will learn to identify MA, IB, and ER; respond instead of reacting to these stressors; re-center/refocus after racialized experiences; and process and release the energy generated by such encounters. The facilitators will help you understand these stressors as a result of internal “emotional barometers” being triggered, and they will introduce and model various evidence-based tools and techniques to improve emotional intelligence, analytical thinking, and internal awareness. You will learn a variety of self-care techniques, including meditation, conscious breathing, and active imagination.
  • Block: AM Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 8:00 AM-12:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Yakima 2
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Jeff Menzise, Mind on the Matter; Maati Wafford, Barrie School (MD)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
ES18. Leveraging Social Media for Discussions on Education, Inclusion, and the Experiences of People of Color PM Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
1:00 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Together we will critique specific social media and online platforms and review established spaces for people of color. We will define various online opportunities, providing language on how they are used and how one would participate within them. Participants will develop a Twitter account and a profile to be used in the workshop; they will practice participation in a Twitter chat with a live, in-workshop chat. In small groups, we will discuss how these opportunities could enhance our personal and professional growth. Participants will design an outline for continued participation and for bringing these strategies to school. Last, we will identify ways to participate in NAIS hashtags during the conference.
  • Block: PM Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 1:00 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 2
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Nola-rae Cronan, The Langley School (VA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
ES19. N!gga(er) in the Classroom, Hallway, Recess: Are We Becoming Moore Accepting of The Word? PM Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
1:00 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Engage in activities to examine your personal and professional histories with N!gga(er), and explore pictures and feelings associated with the word. Explore the prominence of N!gga(er) in media, literature, and music and its impact on our youth. Learn to address internal racism and biases, and discover where they arise from and how they contribute to daily interactions and school culture. You will leave with ideas and skills to address inclusive language, policies, and practices, and you will develop plans for positive education leadership of the entire school community.
  • Block: PM Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 1:00 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 3
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Eddie Moore Jr., The Privilege Institute; Ali Michael, Race Institute for K-12 Educators
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
ES20. Shining a Light! Illuminating Underrepresented Stories on the Elementary School Campus PM Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
1:00 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: This seminar will equip participants to go back to their schools with ideas to share with teachers, administrators, and their diversity committee, if they have one, about possible systemic approaches and specific projects to bring visibility to underrepresented groups. In addition to facilitating exercises similar to what we use in our own ongoing professional development to establish our group as a learning community, we will provide opportunities for smaller groups to connect and share ideas throughout the workshop. We will share our inspirations, our key learnings, and our collective commitment to illuminating and celebrating these stories in our community.
  • Block: PM Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 1:00 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2B
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Britt Anderson, Maria Montes Clemens, Melody Esquer Gil, and Priti Hulse, Prospect Sierra School (CA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
ES21. Stay Tuned: Practicing Listening Leadership in Schools PM Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
1:00 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: This seminar draws on original research by the presenter on the art and science of listening. It will introduce the practice of listening leadership, a key framework for understanding schools and enacting transformative change. This seminar is also informed by interdisciplinary practices and will demonstrate the power of melding school practices with researched practices from the field of humanities, sound studies, adult learning, and organizational theory and practice for change.
  • Block: PM Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 1:00 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 310
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Nicole Furlonge, Klingenstein Center, Teachers College, Columbia University
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
ES22. Using Circles as a Restorative Practice in Independent Schools: Supporting Students of Color PM Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
1:00 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Circles are a method of restorative practice that help community members reconnect themselves with others, create a brave space for all voices, and enable participants to be their best selves, particularly when conflicts may arise. In this workshop, teachers and administrators can explore the indigenous beginnings of circles, the basic process of circles and how they may be used within the context of their school community to reinforce community values, strengthen positive relationships during conflicts, and provide diverse perspectives to engage in inclusion and equity work. Participants will learn the essential elements of circles and how to organize, plan, and lead a circle. They will also have the opportunity to practice facilitating a circle with the goal of supporting students of color.
  • Block: PM Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 1:00 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 4
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Ruth Bissell, Loren Moyé, Betsy Brody, and Justin Lenzi, San Francisco Day School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
ES23. What Your AAPI Students and Faculty Won’t Tell You, But You Need to Know PM Equity Seminar Wednesday, December 4,
1:00 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Learn how the model minority myth affects members of your community, and learn strategies to prevent reinforcing stereotypes and marginalization of AAPI community members. Explore qualitative data collected from independent school student and adult communities.
  • Block: PM Equity Seminar (Wednesday, December 4, 1:00 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 5
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Drew Ishii, Sage Hill School (CA); Min Pai, Westland School (CA); Cheryl Ting, Redwood Day School (CA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Dear White Folks at PoCC: A Love Letter in Workshop Form A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: At last year’s PoCC, a post called “Dear White Folks at PoCC” was read more than 3,500 times over a few days. People of color shared it with their white colleagues, and white colleagues took it as a learning opportunity to notice their own race at PoCC. Some engaged in conversation about it during the conference while others processed its message more privately. But what does this conversation look like in workshop form? Join Liza Talusan along with a panel of colleagues to hear about what they hope white people know and understand about their presence at PoCC. As a love letter, this workshop is designed to “call in” allies, accomplices, and learners so that we can all build awareness, capacity, and cultural responsibility in this work.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 307-308
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are aspects of the hidden curriculum at PoCC?
    • How do some people of color experience the participation of White colleagues at PoCC?
    • How might White folks at PoCC contribute to a supportive environment at the conference?
  • Presenters: Liza Talusan, LT Coaching and Consulting LLC (MA)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Intersectionality of Identifying as Asian and LGBTQ Educators A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: In this workshop, our panel of presenters, disparate educators from varied walks of life, will share their intersectional experiences as educators who identify as both Asian and LGBTQ and how their experiences have shaped who they are today. How can an LGBTQ educator of color navigate this intersectionality in and out of the classroom? How do our intersectional identities impact our students, colleagues, and administrators? These stories will aid in understanding that no one experience identifies us all. Through role-play in the second half of the workshop, participants will have the opportunity to put themselves in a position that may not be their own so that they will gain new perspectives into another person’s world.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 205
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can an LGBTQ educator of color navigate intersectionality in and out of the classrooms?
    • Educators who identify as Asian and LGBTQ have differing and varied stories.
    • What the possible implications of a supportive or unsupportive environment are.
  • Presenters: Caleb Goh, Poly Prep Country Day School (NY); Clara Ngo, Hillbrook School (CA); Brian Trinh, Westminster Schools of Atlanta (GA); Jackie Sa, The Berkeley School (CA); Yvette Avila, Lakeside School (WA)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
UPLIFT: How Affinity Spaces Help Girls of Color Thrive in Independent Schools A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Many independent schools have made significant progress in diversifying their student body, but our girls of color often struggle to feel fully included and supported in their environments. It is important to affirm the various identities that are present in this community and to develop strategies to address their specific needs. By establishing the UPLIFT program, we have not only created a framework to support girls of color from the beginning of lower school through graduation from upper school, we have also helped create a community of girls of color who are confident and successful self and community advocates.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 303
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Is affinity work for students divisive?
    • How can the experiences of girls of color in independent schools vary by ethnic identity?
    • How do you create a framework to support girls of color thrive in independent school?
  • Presenters: Renyelle Jimenez, Horace Mann School (NY); Terri-Ann Gordon and Aundrea Tabbs-Smith, Waterside School (CT); Charaun Wills, Rye Country Day School (NY)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Self-Knowledge Is Power! A New Racial Literacy Toolkit for K-8 Students A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: A team of educators from Pollyanna, Inc., have created a comprehensive, innovative Racial Literacy Curriculum for grades K-8. It is designed to help students gain knowledge about race as it has been constructed in the U.S. The curriculum also supports students in acquiring an awareness of their own racial socialization and skills for engaging in productive conversations about race and racism. Available to schools without charge since spring 2019, the curriculum has been crafted for educators with a range of experience. This workshop will introduce the curriculum and review example lessons and core ideas. After taking this workshop, participants will better understand race as a social construct and feel more confident and inspired to incorporate race into their teaching.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 310
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Why is studying race important; How can race best be incorporated into classroom curriculum?
    • How is race biologically untrue but socially real?
    • What is the historical construction of race in U.S. society?
  • Presenters: Casper Caldarola and Monique Vogelsang, Pollyanna Inc.
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Instituting Reflective Practice Groups to Maximize Inclusivity at Independent Schools On Demand A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: The Reflective Practice Group (RPG) model will be presented as a method to bring the SEED voluntary participation method to scale by making it a professional requirement for all staff, thus actively honoring the importance of training for all teachers on equity and inclusion. The presenter originated the RPG model in a public elementary school setting and then adapted it to his independent elementary school. Through sharing how the model was proposed to school administration, developed, explained to staff, and implemented, this workshop will give participants a step-by-step understanding of how such a model can be realized in their own settings. Facilitation principles and techniques, surveys used, actual lesson plans, and participant feedback will be provided.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 211
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is the value of reflective practice discussion groups for teachers and other school staff at independent schools?
    • How can my independent school develop a reflective practice group program?
    • What are the best practice facilitation skills and session content for reflective practice groups?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Carlos Hoyt, Belmont Day School (MA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Navigating Wholeness in Our Schools: Reclaiming Our Time and Our Authentic Selves A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: The toll of working at predominantly white institutions can be especially taxing for people of color. Institutions that were, by design, created neither by us nor for us inherently infuse biases and oppressions historically created and perpetuated within the United States. Navigating microaggressions, imposter syndrome, gaslighting, and code-switching while doing our best for our students can lead to losing or ignoring aspects of our multicultural selves; this reality calls for healing. In this workshop, we will discuss and practice strategies designed to help us be our whole selves and embrace all of our identities, both within and beyond our institutions. We invite our fellow PoCs to join us on this exploration of how we can thrive in spaces where we were not expected to survive.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 2
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can we, as poc, reclaim all aspects of our identities and effectively remain whole in our PWIs?
    • What strategies and methods can we employ to continue the work while navigating our own healing processes?
    • How can we thrive in spaces not designed for our presence or success?
  • Presenters: Patricia Matos, Ethical Culture Fieldston School (NY); Motoko Maegawa, Poly Prep Country Day School (NY)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Amplify Your Leadership Qualities, Professional Learning, and Career A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Are you an early or mid-career educator of color considering pursuing a doctoral degree? Have you wondered about the value of this undertaking and its impact on your career? Bring your questions to this session, which is led by students in the Mid-Career Doctoral Program in Educational Leadership at the University of Pennsylvania. Listen to the panel members reflect on their experiences in the program, including research opportunities, and how these experiences have influenced their leadership roles and informed their professional learning.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 3
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can I grow my leadership qualities in independent schools?
    • What opportunities exist for experienced educators who wish to advance their professional learning?
    • What career opportunities exist for experienced educators in independent schools?
  • Presenters: Matthew Suzuki, Rye Country Day School (NY); Michael Johanek, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania; Regina Nixon, Nashoba Brooks School (MA); Jennifer Stimpson, Hockaday School (TX)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Disrupting the System From Within On Demand A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: What’s the impact when we whitewash history? Hear how a few “progressive” educators got tired of kind, well-meaning teachers bringing racism into the classroom by perpetuating the oppressive pedagogy that continues to marginalize people of color. The story begins with Dr. Seuss and ends with rosé.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is a model you can use with colleagues to explore oppressive systems at your school both on an individual and institutional level?
    • How can a professional learning community (PLC) disrupt racist classroom practices and curriculum at your school?
    • How can teachers join forces to explore ideas behind race and its impact on the classroom?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Vanessa Gutierrez, Jenifer Moore, and Nina Austin, The Key School (MD)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
How Can Black People Work Toward Liberation for Themselves and Black Students in Independent Schools? A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: White supremacy and its practices are rooted in the subjugation of black bodies. Each day, black people must fight against the systematic and continuous oppression that started with enslavement and continues with subpar education and laws designed to suppress and oppress black people rather than provide federal protection. “We who believe in freedom cannot rest,” so while black people cannot rest as they continue to fight for their freedom, they must also deal with the chronic stress caused by racism. Working together as a collective of black independent school educators and employees, attendees will workshop strategies for survival and rest and envision techniques for tagging each other “in” and “out” while doing the work of dismantling racism and combating anti-blackness in white supremacist spaces.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 4
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is liberation for black people?
    • How can we recognize oppression/suppression?
    • In what ways have our internalized racial inferiority caused us to work against our own freedom?
  • Presenters: April Broussard, The Town School (NY); Rhashida Hilliard, Horace Mann School (NY)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Beyond Buses and Boycotts: Revamping Black History Month and Your Entire School Calendar A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Raven Wilkinson, Bass Reeves, Mary Fields, Lonnie Johnson, and Ann Cole Low—these are not names you usually hear during Black History Month, but why not? In this session, you will discover innovative ways to shake the dust off your Black History Month curriculum. You will come away with resources to reinvigorate your February and new ways to highlight the achievements of PoC throughout the school year. In this seminar, you will discuss navigating your own and your students’ discomfort in dealing with sensitive topics, learn ways to present information through the lens of cultural competency, and empower the students in your classroom to celebrate themselves and each other.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Chelan 4
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • I am a science/math etc teacher. How can I incorporate POC achievements into my curriculum?
    • How much time in the day do I need to set aside to incorporate this work into my curriculum?
    • How can I be sure that I am appropriately and authentically incorporating the achievements of POC when that is not my frame of reference?
  • Presenters: Jeannine Brown, Carolina Friends School (NC)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Afrofuturism and Social Justice: Ideas Through Art, Literature, and Science A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Students learn the concepts of afrofuturism and the artists/musician/writers who incorporate these ideals into their work, such as Janelle Monáe, Hebru Brantley, Sun Ra, Octavia Butler, and Turtel Onli. Discussions of ancient Nubia, cross-curriculum references, and unit ideas will be included. This session is for lower school educators.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 210
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is Afro-Futurism and how does it lend itself to culturally responsive teaching?
    • What lessons around Afro-Futurism can I take back to the classroom and implement right away?
    • How do you collaborate authentically with colleagues across subject areas?
  • Presenters: Joseph Kerney, Allison Beaulieu, Micyelia Sanders, and Joseph Kerney, University of Chicago Laboratory Schools (IL)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
A Home Away From Home: Diversity and Inclusion in the Dorms A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Audre Lorde famously said, “Without community there is no liberation.” How is community created in dormitories, and how can it be enhanced for the liberation of all its members? Students spend a great deal of time in campus housing, making dormitories key for thinking about how we live out institutional and personal goals around diversity and social justice. In this interactive workshop, the presenter will share resources and activities she organized as dorm head of an all-gender dorm. In particular, she will talk about community rules, formal dorm events, and informal networks of care. Together we’ll discuss how these “homes away from home” can support student leadership, provide vital education, and affirm students as they explore various components of their identity.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Yakima 1
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can residential life programming support underrepresented students?
    • How can dorm heads make events more inclusive?
    • How can we hold space for dorm residents when they have to process disturbing current events?
  • Presenters: Courtney Marshall, Phillips Exeter Academy (NH)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Do You See What I See? The Impact of Trauma on Students of Color (Part I) A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Students of color, those in poverty, and those who are otherwise marginalized face daily challenges. Included in these challenges, but much less recognized or discussed, is trauma. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has asserted that childhood trauma has a long-term impact on life expectancy, education, health care, and involvement in the criminal justice system. The first step toward solving a problem is knowing that there is a problem. But many of our students are suffering in silence. This workshop intends to raise awareness and knowledge of trauma. Participants will learn what trauma is, how to recognize trauma in our students, and how trauma impacts students’ ability to fully engage in the school day.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 400
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is trauma?
    • How do we recognize trauma in students of color?
    • How does trauma impact a students ability to fully engage?
  • Presenters: Keba Rogers, Trevor Day School (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Mizrahi and Sephardi: A Case Study on Race, Ethnicity, and Jewish Memory A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: How does a diverse religion or ethnic group navigate a communal past of victimhood? Within the Jewish community, there are a number of subethnic groups including Ashkenazim, Sephardim, and Mizrahim (who trace their origins to the Middle East and North Africa). In this session, we will explore the ways in which narratives of oppression and victimhood are told in a multi-ethnic religious and cultural group. We will navigate how the Holocaust has come to be owned exclusively by Ashkenazi (European) Jews, and why that is problematic given the experience of North African and Middle Eastern Jews who also lived under Nazi occupation. We will ask critical questions about how race and ethnicity impact a community’s understanding of victimhood and oppression.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: Sheraton, Ravenna A-B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are the dominant narratives told about Jewish oppression and victimhood--specifically around the Holocaust--and how are they incomplete?
    • How are narratives of oppression and victimhood constructed: whose memories are amplified, whose are diminished or silenced, and how do these disparities in representation fall along racial or ethnic lines?
    • How do race and ethnicity impact communal memory? How can we arrive at more complete and nuanced understandings of the past? What impact does that have on contemporary diverse communities
  • Presenters: Adam Eilath, Ronald C. Wornick Jewish Day School (CA); Bryan Susman, Columbia University
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Children's Literature—Moving From Windows and Doors to Prisms: Representations of South Asians in Literature A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Books can be mirrors, windows, and doors into other cultures. But that seems voyeuristic. What if we saw books as a prism reflecting back onto society? This workshop will focus on representations of South Asians and Muslims in post-colonial literature and compare them to the work of current South Asian authors.The right kinds of books in the hands of our children, guided by our principles of inclusion and equity, can help shape the discourse in our classrooms and make our students of minority backgrounds feel valued and included.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: Sheraton, Ballard
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How were South Asians and Muslims represented in literature in the past?
    • How did stereotypical portraying of South Asians impact the community?
    • What are prism texts and how can they help teachers select appropriate texts?
  • Presenters: Maleeha Malik, Friends School of Baltimore (MD)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
They Took My Spot! Race and Standardized Testing in the Anti-Affirmative Action Era A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Given the recent “Varsity Blues” cheating scandal, the lawsuit against Harvard University for alleged discrimination against Asian American applicants, and renewed calls for ending Affirmative Action in college admissions, many aspects of the admission process are under tremendous scrutiny. With two former college admission officers who currently work as college counselors in independent schools, this session will explore the various issues involved in college admission selection and the role that standardized testing plays. Contributing to the discussion will be a college admission test expert whose research and data focus on the methods and selection criteria for creating standardized tests like the SAT and ACT.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Chelan 5
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Are college admission tests culturally, racially or socially biased?
    • Are students of color unfairly advantaged in the college admission process?
    • What has been the response from college admission offices and testing agencies regarding the importance of diversity, access, and equity?
  • Presenters: Tamar Adegbile, Cate School (CA); Joy Gray Prince, Atlanta Girls' School (GA); Jay Rosner, Princeton Review Foundation
Data Use in Activism: Evidence-based Equity and Justice Programming, Research and Evaluation
Grading for Equity: What It Is, Why It Matters, How It Transforms Schools and Classrooms A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Grades not only inform monumental decisions about our students—course placement, interventions, promotion and retention, athletic eligibility, scholarships and financial aid, graduation, and college admission—they also inform a student’s self-concept and psychological well-being. Yet grading practices often vary widely from teacher to teacher and can be a source of intense stress for our students and families. Even worse, many common grading practices, created during the Industrial Revolution, are imbued with institutional and implicit biases that undermine our equity work. Without a shared understanding of the most effective and equitable practices, we can inadvertently perpetuate achievement and opportunity gaps among our students. In this workshop, explore grading practices that are accurate, bias-resistant, and motivational, and learn about the power of these practices for student learning and more equitable classrooms and schools.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Tahoma 2
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do our traditional grading practices harm students (particularly those historically underserved), perpetuate achievement and opportunity gaps, and make our teaching less effective?
    • What grading practices are more equitable, and how are they more accurate, bias-resistant, and motivational?
    • What is the impact of these grading practices, both on a classroom scale and a school-wide scale?
  • Presenters: Joe Feldman, Crescendo Education Group; Mark Boswell, Marin Country Day School (CA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Surviving “The Mammy Complex”: Being “the Only” in a Brave New World A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: From the days of enslavement through the Jim Crow Era, the Mammy has served as a caricature of the political, cultural, and economic interests of White America. She rears, leads, and educates the young people in her care as they embody and personify steady change and personal growth. In our predominantly white institutions, the Mammy manifests, most often unwittingly, in the women of color on our faculties and administrations who are “the only one.” This workshop attempts to unpack the many layers of being “other” while remaining authentic, leading with dignity, and maintaining our integrity as educators while sharing our best selves with our students and colleagues.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 5
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How does the Mammy fit into our classroom landscape, and what does she offer to our 21st century students?
    • Why is she sought out and revered by those who may not completely understand her?
    • What can we do to assure that she is protected, encouraged, and supported in her otherness?
  • Presenters: Deena Sellers, Xavier High School (NY)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
We Wear the Mask: Stories of the Black Girl Experience in Predominantly White Independent Schools On Demand A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Using the theories of critical race, black identity, and black feminism as a conceptual framework, this research explored the role of race/class/gender and parental support as contributing factors to the racial consciousness development of black girls in middle school. An analysis of the narratives of black girls revealed important factors that contributed to the development of a racial consciousness such as the absence of a black faculty advocate, the burden of microaggressions, and the tension to define what it means to be black. Additional findings showed that the participants’ mothers emphasized nurturing black identity and friendships to help guide their daughters through critical racial experiences. Findings led to important recommendations to improve the educational experiences of black girls in predominantly white spaces.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 204
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What issues and themes emerge when Black girls describe their experiences at predominantly white, elite independent schools?
    • What do Black girls identify as positive experiences within this context and what do they believe should change in order to enhance their experience?
    • How do mothers of Black girls in predominantly white, elite independent schools perceive the experiences of their children?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Tina Evans, Brentwood School (CA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Administrators of Color Matter: How to Strengthen Your Candidacy in Pursuit of Leadership Positions On Demand A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Leadership opportunities for people of color in independent schools are increasing, but the overall number of people of color in administrative roles continues to trail far behind our white colleagues. This workshop will explore how you can advance your career in independent schools. We will discuss professional development opportunities that broaden your skill set in order to promote your candidacy, what search committees look for in candidates for leadership positions, and how to navigate the interview process. The workshop will also provide advice on identifying and confronting barriers in your school community that may prohibit your professional growth. We will share best practices for conducting your search as well as anecdotes from the perspectives of both candidates and search committees.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 201
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do you advance your career in independent schools?
    • When is the right time to pursue leadership positions?
    • How do you identify and confront barriers that prohibit the advancement of your career in your school community?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Justin Brandon, Francis W. Parker School (IL); Priscilla Morales, The Park School of Baltimore (MD)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Strategic Design for Equity and Inclusion On Demand A Thursday, December 5,
1:45 PM-3:00 PM
  • Summary: Leading efforts toward more equitable and inclusive school communities can sometimes feel like pushing a boulder up a steep hill. With challenges that are very complex and often abstract, it can be difficult to design changes in culture and curriculum that will have meaningful and lasting impact. How do you break the boulder into smaller, more liftable rocks? How do you design initiatives that will solve pressing challenges and leverage opportunities for change? This active session will use frameworks from the NAIS Strategy Lab workshops to guide participants through a design process focused on equity and inclusion initiatives at the school. Applying these frameworks to your work can help you design innovations that are purpose-driven, insightful, and actionable.
  • Block: A (Thursday, December 5, 1:45 PM-3:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do I unpack some of our DEI challenges and opportunities to get to the root issue?
    • How can I use a systems thinking approach to design and enhance DEI prototypes and initiatives?
    • What roles should our team members play as we work to design and implement DEI work in our school?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Mark Mitchell and Tim Fish, NAIS
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Colorism in the Latinx Community On Demand B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: “Colorism” is a term commonly used among people of color, but what does this look like in the Latinx community? In this workshop, we will discuss different instances of colorism from varying Latinx lenses. Attendees will explore their own experiences, look at case studies, and walk away with strategies for addressing colorism when they witness it. By changing the narrative in their personal lives and in their schools, participants will be able to spread awareness and create a more equitable and inclusive environment for both educators and students.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 211
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is colorism and how has it affected your identity or that of others in the Latinx community?
    • What strategies can we use to address colorism?
    • How can we spread awareness about colorism in the Latinx community in order create a more equitable environment for educators and students in our school?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Gabmara Alvarez-Spychalski, The Baldwin School (PA); Kerry Kettering-Goens, The Haverford School (PA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Are You Doing Your Work? Calling in Our Cisgender and Heterosexual PoC Allies B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Often as people of color we want our white allies to educate themselves and do their own personal work around privilege in order to support equity and inclusion in independent schools. We, as LGBTQ people of color, want the same from our heterosexual and cisgender colleagues of color. In this workshop, we will explore the role of allyship (as a verb) specifically for PoC supporting LGBTQ PoC. We will provide five concrete actions PoC allies can take to support those of us with intersecting, marginalized identities around race, gender, and sexuality. This workshop will include a panel of LGBTQ+ PoC independent school faculty who will provide examples of experiences we’ve had with supportive allies and some we wish could have gone better.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 303
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What steps can I (POC Allies) take to interrupt heterosexism, homophobia, and transphobia?
    • What resources can I utilize as I do my own personal work?
    • How can I be in partnership with LGBTQ+ POC in my community and workspace?
  • Presenters: Tamisha Williams, Lick-Wilmerding High School (CA); Johanna Aeschliman, Redwood Day School (CA); Corey Baker, Keys School (CA)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
PoC in Senior Administration: Why and How We Do the Work B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: As educators of color, we’re drawn to school communities because of our love of learning and our passion for nurturing young people. Have you ever pondered the idea of becoming an administrator in independent schools and thought “I wouldn't know where to start”? This panel of longtime, senior-level, and emerging administrators offer perspectives on the importance of having PoC in leadership. When were the pivotal moments in our career paths and who were the mentors who nurtured us? What are the joys and the sorrows of senior administrative roles? How have we developed professional expertise? Two assistant heads of school, a campus director, and a chief diversity officer share experiences in senior administration and respond to the question, “Why do administrators of color matter?”
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 2
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • When were the pivotal moments in our career paths and who were the mentors who nurtured us?
    • What are the joys and the sorrows of senior administrative roles?
    • How have we developed professional expertise?
  • Presenters: Ricco Siasoco, Chadwick School (CA); Liz Fernández, Ethical Culture Fieldston School (NY); Roger Bridges, Echo Horizon School (CA); Losmeiya Huang, Growing Place (CA)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Toxic Stress in the Lived Experience of People of Color B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Developmental psychologists use the term “toxic stress” to describe the frequent and prolonged adverse experiences that negatively affect a child’s emotional, mental, and physical development. These include varying degrees of neglect, abuse, and familial burdens—generally existing in the absence of nurturing adult support. One reason that our students and adult colleagues of color sometimes fail to thrive is because we are not aware of toxic stressors, such as the cumulative harm of microaggressions, strained learning and working conditions, being measured by higher standards, or the paucity of validation from one’s peer group . This workshop aims to identify toxic stressors prevalent in our school communities and to take measures to actively reduce the negative effects of these adverse experiences.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Yakima 1
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How is toxic stress different from positive or tolerable stress?
    • To identify toxic stress in the lives of people of color in one’s own community.
    • To help mitigate the negative effects of adverse experiences.
  • Presenters: Susan Park, The Hotchkiss School (CT); Josefina Ayllon-Ayllon, The Lawrenceville School (NJ)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Plotting Your Course From Teacher to School Leader B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Are you an educator who is considering exploring an administrative role in independent schools? What tools do you need to take that next step? How do you leverage all of your talents as a teacher and leader to land a formal leadership position? What does this mean for you as a person of color? Two new senior administrators of color will share their varied journeys into school leadership and open up about the importance of having a diverse skill set, a network of mentors, resilience, and an understanding of self. By the end of the session, participants will begin to develop a vision for their next career steps. There are many routes into school leadership; what will your path be?
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 205
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How does one become a school administrator in independent schools?
    • How does one leverage their talents as a teacher-leader and land a formal leadership position?
    • What qualities/credentials must one have in order to become an administrator in general?
  • Presenters: Betty Noel, Saint Ann's School (NY); Naomi White Randolph, Ethical Culture Fieldston School (NY)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Biases and Balance (Part II): Talking to Families of Color About Learning Challenges B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Part I of Biases and Balance focused on how racial biases about students of color affect our perceptions of students’ academic performance and behavior in school. A common problem that arises when students of color demonstrate learning challenges is that faculty and administrators often make assumptions about the cultural beliefs, socioeconomic status, language, educational background, and structure of families of color. In this session, we will continue the work by having participants engage in a critical analysis of their own biases when interacting with families of color and the ways in which we can more effectively communicate with families about academic concerns. The goal is to learn strategies and practice having honest, objective, and supportive conversations to make us better advocates for students of color.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 5
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • When and how do we choose to raise concerns with families of color, and how might this be different from when we have concerns about white students?
    • How do biases about students and families of color influence the timeline for identifying learning challenges and/or social emotional needs as well as the types of interventions put in place for students of color?
    • What stops us from having honest conversations with families of color in regards to inequities in access and navigating the system?
  • Presenters: Kristen Goodlett and Khaliah Williams, The Berkeley Carroll School (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
The Life of the Diversity Practitioner: Circle of Rebirth or Cycle of Abuse? B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Independent schools proudly endorse diversity and equity in their missions; yet unspoken, vague, and unrealistic expectations and responsibilities dominate the lives of those explicitly engaged in “equity” work. Whether holding formal titles or informally being building “experts,” equity practitioners challenge white supremacy and other insidious narratives, care for the margins while educating everyone else, and contend for justice daily. The equity worker cycle of Championing the Cause-Stress Overload-Disillusionment mirrors the Honeymoon-Tension Building-Crisis that characterizes a system of abuse. The lifestyle is unsustainable; the choice is burn out or get out. Or is it? This workshop provides a framework to illuminate institutional and interpersonal patterns that impact equity work with a focus on practices that engender health and wellness rather than exhaustion and burnout.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 307-308
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is the developmental life cycle of the diversity practitioner?
    • What are the sustainable practices to support growth and avoid burnout?
    • How can the diversity practitioner use frameworks to manage and make sense of their responsibilities?
  • Presenters: Binita M. Donohue and Stacey A. Gibson, Francis Parker School (IL)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
I Woke Up Like This: Teaching and Practicing Authenticity in Predominately White Spaces On Demand B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: As an educator of color, how do we become culturally authentic in predominantly white spaces? In this workshop, we will define cultural authenticity and evaluate whether we as educators are being true to our identities. Attendees will define cultural authenticity for themselves and unpack hindrances that may prevent this from occurring within the institutions they serve. Beyoncé’s artistry serves as an exemplar to provide a framework for the ways in which we navigate mainstream white institutions in an authentic and unapologetic manner. Attendees will walk away with a toolkit to transform their own practice, inspire other educators of color, and teach students of color how to unapologetically express their own intersectional identities in authentic ways within institutions.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 201
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do we as educators use culturally authentic role models, such as Beyonce, to influence and provide a framework in how we navigate predominately white institutions?
    • How do we as educators teach resilience and cultural authenticity to our students of color in predominantly white institutions?
    • How do we ourselves as educators seek to remain authentic to our intersectional identities, push back against spaces that uphold stereotypes, preconceived notions, and underlying white supremacist ideology, and excel within those transformed spaces?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Rashaad Phillips, The Dalton School (NY); Ayesha Numan, Woodside Priory (CA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Intergenerational Identity Development: Supporting Younger Generations B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: In the 2018-2019 school year, we undertook the process of changing the name of our Latinx affinity group. In doing so, we uncovered multiple perspectives and strong feelings attached to the language people use to identify across generational lines. Our experience has been reflected on the national level as seen in the recent decision of MEChA, the historic Chicanx student organization, to change its name. We hope to share our experience in helping K-8 students develop language to describe and talk about their identities in order to start a dialogue on the challenges that come at the intersection of identity and language. What do we call ourselves when we don’t agree on which words best describe us?
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 210
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are the different ways one can identify?
    • How do you support younger generations to develop terminology that represents their identity?
    • How do you value older generations and their attachment to language when they may be different than younger generations?
  • Presenters: Cathy Aragon, California Teacher Development Collaborative; Renee Otero, Davina Vera, April Pagan, and Tanya Kaplow, San Francisco Day School (CA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Why Not Now? Exploring Race, Identity, and Differences in Early Childhood B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Topics surrounding diversity are often overlooked in early childhood education. Research shows that children as young as six months are curious about the physical characteristics of self and others (skin color, hair texture, gender). But what happens when questions surrounding such subjects arise in school? It is essential to start these discussions at a young age. But how do we approach these complex topics? Explore abstract and concrete materials and activities designed to help open young minds. This interactive workshop will give you techniques to reach children with diverse needs Follow us as we share experiences from our year of helping students understand different points of view. Depart empowered with tools to inspire children to observe, value others, take pride in themselves and their families, and build empathy.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 3
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do I begin to create a curriculum around race and inclusion in a preschool and early elementary setting?
    • What kinds of tools, materials, and play-based activities do I need to reach younger audiences?
    • How do we also reach the children who need extra support and adaptations?
  • Presenters: Ashley Nartey and Taylor Fitzpatrick, National Child Research Center
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Hiring Leaders of Color: Easier Said Than Done? B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Want to hire leaders of color? And finding that easier said than done? There’s no instant “fix” to a hiring and employment situation that’s been centuries in the making, but by understanding institutional history and culture, we can intentionally (re)design for more racially inclusive and equitable hiring experiences and outcomes. This starts with flipping the perspective that leaders of color are “unicorns” to investigate how our systems make it rare for leaders of color to emerge. This workshop will use scenarios based on facilitators’ and participants’ experiences to tap our collective wisdom and imaginations for effective strategies and practices for recruitment, hiring, and retention. Participants will walk away with what Mica Pollock (author of Everyday Racism) termed “try tomorrow” tools and action items, as well as ideas for longer-term strategies.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Tahoma 2
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Why is it hard to “find” leaders of color?
    • If our school wants to hire more leaders of color, what do we need to commit to long-term?
    • What can we do to broaden access and inclusion in our hiring process right now?
  • Presenters: Alison Park, Blink Consulting; Steve Morris, The San Francisco School (CA); Percy Abram, The Bush School (WA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Upstream: Songs for Building Equitable, Just, Loving Community in Preschool-Third Grade Classrooms B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Nip troubles in the bud; sow the great in the small. Big things of the world can only be tackled by tending to their small beginnings.—Lao Tzu In order to build the world we need, we must head upstream and begin the work of equity and justice with our youngest learners. In this workshop, we will share a participatory sequence of our songs and discuss using them to open up meaningful, developmentally appropriate dialogue and action in the classroom around racial justice, equity, identity, solidarity, self-love, and beloved community in the face of role models demonstrating the opposite. We will end by sharing our creative process and putting it to use in order to make a full group song! Come sing with us!
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 4
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do I talk with the youngest members of my school community and their families about racial justice?
    • How can music powerfully compliment the equity and justice work I already do in class and help extend these conversations into my students' homes?
    • What key themes and language can I build my DEI curriculum map around for young learners?
  • Presenters: Dwight Dunston, Friends' Central School (PA); Brian Caselli Jordan, City Love/The Philadelphia School (PA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
The Boarding School Reality for Black and Brown Faculty B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: North American boarding schools hold a certain mystique among the American populus. While much of this is generated through falsities found in popular culture films that present a level of homogeneity and privilege, such as Dead Poets Society, other perceptions are institutionalized, which tends to place faculty of color on the outside looking in. In the 21st century, a number of boarding schools have increased their efforts to extend full citizenship to faculty of color, noting a need for a talented, diverse faculty. This panel of current and former boarding school members offer a critique exploring the extent to which boarding schools have advanced in being fully inclusive to faculty of color, as panelists reflect on their experiences.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Yakima 2
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are the positive and negative realities of working at a triple threat (teaching, coaching, residential life) boarding school?
    • From the experiences of panel members, what should faculty members of color know before they commit to boarding school life
    • Why do some of us elect to stay, while others leave?
  • Presenters: Edward Carson and Faith Kagwa, The Governor's Academy (MA); Johara Tucker, Head-Royce School (CA); Anika Walker-Johnson, Germantown Academy (PA); LeRhonda Greats, Viewpoint School (CA)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
STEM Is Not Exempt: Anti-Racist STEM Education B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: STEM teachers can be and must be anti-racist educators. In this session we will explore this role, identifying challenges unique to our field and sharing examples of work we’ve done and the powerful response from our students. Through individual and small- and large-group reflection, attendees will have an opportunity to articulate what anti-racist STEM education can look like in their schools, identify concrete steps they can bring to their classrooms next week and beyond, and form community with other dedicated educators.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 1
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can STEM teachers turn their classrooms into spaces of anti-racist education and agents of powerful social change?
    • What resources and examples already exist for these teachers?
    • What unique obstacles and challenges face anti-racist STEM educators, and how can they be overcome?
  • Presenters: Alyssa Reyes and Moses Rifkin, University Preparatory Academy (WA); Shaye Whitmer, The Evergreen School (WA)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Your Path: A Journey Defined Through Six-Word Stories B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: This workshop is designed for you—the person who dedicates endless hours to uplifting students but rarely has the time to take care of yourself. Working in a school can be taxing. As adults we often don’t reflect on our experiences and how they impact our daily existence. Participants in this workshop will reflect on their journey, using a series of six-word stories to represent significant moments in their lives. As educators, our experiences impact our teaching style, attitude, and relationships with both colleagues and students. This journey through time is meant for both participants of color and white participants. We will come together as a group to see how our stories are similar, how they differ, and what that means within an educational institution.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: Sheraton, Ravenna A-B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can self reflection help you to better support students?
    • What experiences do you bring into the educational space each day and how does that impact those that you interact with?
    • How do individual journeys come together to best support students?
  • Presenters: Shahna-Lee James, The Berkeley Carroll School (NY)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
DEI Strategic Partnership Gets Results On Demand B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Diversity, equity, and inclusion work is impossible to do alone. It requires an articulated institutional commitment, clear expectations, and a competent team of doers. In this workshop, participants will learn how to design an integrated approach to DEI work, build a diverse and effective team, and strategize communication to highlight the value of this important work.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do I communicate that DEI work is everyone's work?
    • How do I get my school to prioritize DEI work?
    • Who should be on my equity and inclusion team?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Stephanie Bramlett and Sami Atif, Phillips Exeter Academy (NH)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Transracially Adopted Students: A Forgotten Minority B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Do you have transracial adoptees in your classroom or school? Do you know what their experiences are at your school? Do they feel the need to code-switch for survival? Are they integrated into their racial community? This workshop will increase your understanding of the multifaceted nature of transracial adoptees’ identity by hearing firsthand accounts from transracially adopted youth through “The Adopted Life” web series. Teachers, staff, and administrators need to be equipped to have sustained and healthy discussions about race, culture, and identity within the context of transracial adoption in order to build capacity to create a more inclusive environment, both in and out of the classroom.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, Chelan 5
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are the issues transracial adopted youth are experiencing?
    • How might these issues be present in our schools and impacting our students?
    • How can teachers in predominantly white private schools help children of color thrive?
  • Presenters: Angela Tucker, Amara; Beth Wheeler, Edges Education
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
The Guide for White Women Who Teach Black Boys B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: This workshop will introduce The Guide for White Women Who Teach Black Boys, which was created to support white women to engage in concentrated, focused inquiry around their relationships with black male students and the impact on those relationships of race and racism. The session supports white teachers in their search for opportunities for personal growth as educators and the academic achievement of their black male students. The guide engages the readers in personal and professional introspective work, taking them through works by experts, stories by educators and students, and videos that help personalize the educational lives of black males.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Chelan 2
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is the current state of the education of Black boys?
    • How can White Women form better relationships with their Black boys?
    • What are some classroom methods and pedagogy that could improve the academic achievement of Black boys?
  • Presenters: Eddie Moore Jr., The Privilege Institute; Ali Michael, Race Institute for K-12 Educators
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
The Power of BEING in Life and Diversity, Equity, Inclusion Work On Demand B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: It is so easy to get lost in the necessary doing that is associated with diversity, equity, and inclusion work and, more significantly, everyday life. However, the importance of our being in this work and in life is quite powerful in itself. In this workshop, we will explore the power that comes from just showing up as our unique selves every day and how we make a difference not only through what we do but through who we are.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 204
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is my way of BEING?
    • How is my Being related to my work in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion? How do I show up in my everyday life?
    • What are the possibilities if I leverage my Being to impact my life and school community in a more POWERFUL way?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Lisa Pryor, The Orchard School (IN)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Decolonizing Hearts and Minds: Using Ancestral Healing and Ancient Wisdom to Transmute Wounds Into Power B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Our workshop will focus on different healing modalities that people of color can tap into that re-center our needs and subvert the colonial mindset. Too often, independent schools can serve as spaces that marginalize our communities and deepen societal wounds in a more intimate setting. Measures of success in this context can often be tick marks that continue to center and uplift “whiteness.” Even as we may try to push back against institutional barriers, we may end up duplicating and modeling our socialization, inflicting more harm on ourselves or each other. In this workshop, we seek to upend our conditioning and look to models of healing and transformation that connect us back to ancestral and cultural norms within our varied communities.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Chelan 4
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How is connecting to ancestral/cultural knowledge and experience a mode of healing that will impact your lived experience in independent schools?
    • What modalities can you use to retrain your mind or refocus your thoughts to your core needs vs. finding and honing tools that assure “success” through a dominant cultural lens?
    • How can we cultivate “the witness” of how our core wound can sabotage our power so that we can stay in alignment with our truth and purpose?
  • Presenters: Sheika Luc, Marin Primary & Middle School (CA); Dr. Tone Rawlings, Ph.D., Katherine Delmar Burke School (CA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
The Illusion of Inclusion (Parts I and II) B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Is your school really building an inclusive community for all its members, or are you selling the “illusion” of an inclusive learning community? Using race-based data and other forms of institutional research, Greenhill School is implementing an adapted developmental-stage model to ensure that it is building an inclusive community rather than the illusion of one. Participants will walk away with a method for discerning “fact from fiction” in regard to our schools’ stated or implied intentions regarding diversity, equity, justice, and inclusion (DEJI) work; a framework for conducting and using race-based institutional research to promote DEJI work; and a host of effective facilitation strategies, techniques, and tips that can help turn our mission-driven and visionary-based aspirations into reality.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Tahoma 1
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is an effective blueprint for building an inclusive community?
    • Which Ps (i.e. programs, policies, people, procedures, and pecuniary practices) are critical cornerstones of an inclusive community's foundation and framing?
    • How can your school effectively adapt and utilize this stage model for building an inclusive community to ensure you are not guilty of building an "illusion" of an inclusive community?
  • Presenters: Karen Bradberry, Lizz Melendez, and Shanti Majefski, Greenhill School (TX); Chris Bigenho
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Centering Joy as a Revolutionary Act for Womxn, Femmes, and Non-Binary People of Color B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Let’s explore the pursuit of joy as a tool for subverting narratives that have historically told us who we are, what we’re worth, and how to live. This discussion/presentation examines historical and contemporary scholarship for ways womxn of color can leverage a pursuit of joy as an act of liberation and revolution. We’ll review the writings of such luminaries as Audre Lorde, adrienne maree brown, Akiba Solomon, and Kenrya Rankin to establish a framework that offers specific language, actions, and behaviors that lead to a joy-based liberatory practice tailored to womxn, femmes, and non-binary people of color. Through this frame, we’ll point to ways we might deliver an antidote to internalized racial oppression.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 310
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What does #blackgirlmagic look like when applied as an anti-racism tool?
    • How do Black womxn, in particular, need to employ all intelligences to fight rancism?
    • What specific resources and actions are involved in centering joy as a revolutionary act?
  • Presenters: Michelle Wonsley-Ford, LondonPlane Advisory LLC
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
This Wasn't My Plan: Leveraging Unexpected Leadership Paths for People of Color in Independent Schools On Demand B Thursday, December 5,
3:45 PM-5:00 PM
  • Summary: Many school leaders often say that it was not their intention to pursue leadership in their schools. Further, as people of color we aren’t always tapped when opportunities arise or told where and when to look. While we don’t often know what puts us on the path, taking a step back and studying the various journeys we have taken can offer key takeaways for others considering leadership opportunities. Through examining personal leadership journeys and reflections, this workshop will assist participants in identifying the necessary steps in their pursuit of leadership. Rather than identifying “the” path to leadership, this session will help participants gain insight into the questions to ask and the experiences to consider.
  • Block: B (Thursday, December 5, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can I identify my leadership path?
    • How do I prepare for my leadership journey?
    • Who can help me in my pursuit of leadership?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Eric Osorio, The Calhoun School (NY); Noni Thomas Lopez, Gordon School (RI); Alewa Cooper, Greens Farms Academy (CT); William Gilyard, Kingswood Oxford School (CT); Erica Corbin, Chapin School (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
“Come get your people”: Activating Asian Americans to Dismantle Anti-Blackness On Demand C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: When children cannot find themselves reflected in the books they read, or when the images they see are distorted, negative, or laughable, they learn a powerful lesson about how they are devalued in the society of which they are a part.—Rudine Sims Bishop, Mirrors, Windows, and Sliding Glass Doors Many Asian Americans have failed to see mirrors, windows, and sliding-glass doors of Asian American activism. This absence and distorted narrative have contributed to our quest to be proximate to whiteness and, as a result, anti-blackness. Join us for a critical workshop on why this inquiry matters as educators and to our work in solidarity with the black community as we interrogate our own issues of identity and race and uplift the common struggle.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 201
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What does Asian anti-Blackness mean and how can we trace its origins?
    • What is the community impact of seeing windows, mirrors, and sliding glass doors for Asian Americans engaged in deep activist work?
    • What steps do we need to take to “come get our people” and align our purpose of cross-racial solidarity?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Liza Talusan, LT Coaching and Consulting, LLC
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
We’re Not White: The Internalized Oppression of the Model Minority Myth C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: As Asian American educators, the specificity of the personal identity work that we need to be anti-racist and liberatory educators is often missing. We must also consider Asian American students in our schools who are often ignored and made invisible. This workshop unpacks the relationship between the model minority myth and the racialization of Asian Americans. The presenters investigate how the model minority myth is connected to our internalized oppression and how it can show up as anti-blackness, colorism, and the erasure of non-East-Asian identities in our communities. In order to be anti-racist and make change, we must do the work within our communities. We must take an honest look at our internalized oppression and how we participate in and perpetuate the oppression of others.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 307-308
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How does the model minority myth impact our group and individual identities?
    • How does the model minority myth perpetuate white supremacy?
    • What does it mean to liberate ourselves from the model minority myth?
  • Presenters: Minjung Pai, Westland School (CA); Connie Chiu, Mirman School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Mournable Bodies: The Intended Consequences of Teaching About Racial and Political Violence C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: For those who teach about political violence or racial terror against a racial, ethnic, or religious group, how can the experiences of victims be honored with integrity? Whose gaze is privileged in our curricula? The oppressor or the oppressed? Using examples from curriculum designed to teach eighth graders about the Holocaust, racial terror in the American South, and the immigrant experience in the U.S., this workshop will challenge educators to ask hard questions about their practice and the possibility of implicit bias in their teaching. Participants will leave this session with concrete approaches and models for how to instill empathy while avoiding emotional manipulation in the classroom. We will explore how educators make choices about whose bodies are mourned and which tragedies must be remembered.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 4
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What do educators need to consider when making choices about how we teach about violence against racial, ethnic or religious groups?
    • What are the unintended consequences of teaching the violent past of human civilization?
    • How do we protect our students who identify as racial or religious minorities when exploring the violence against oppressed in the United States and around the world?
  • Presenters: Luke Anderson, The Gordon School (RI)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
CANCELED: Shifting Beyond Patriarchy: Activating Feminine-Rooted Leadership C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: “Playing the game” usually assumes that anyone who occupies or aspires to mainstream leadership will default to and uphold patriarchal leadership models. Male-centered leadership can be relevant and effective in some capacities; however, feminine-rooted leadership frameworks existing before, alongside, and beyond patriarchal models provide opportunities for more egalitarian governance. Furthermore, many male leadership practices hold feminine qualities in contempt and doubt, which reinforces the unwritten rules of “the leadership game.” As women enter into leadership positions, there are increasing calls for more feminine-rooted leadership practices. It is vital to articulate the ways feminine-principled leadership appears in groups and organizations. This advanced/expert workshop, geared to those who identify as women, will explore the complex intersection of reemerging female leadership practices with male-centric leadership models.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are some characteristics of patriarchal leadership?
    • How can an individual observe the impact of patriarchal leadership?
    • What is feminine rooted leadership, and how can it be activated?
  • Presenters: Stacey A. Gibson, Francis W. Parker School (IL)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Building Institutional Capacity for Sustained Conversation About Race On Demand C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: We are living in an increasingly complex world where the job of school leaders to build community grounded in respectful dialogue has never been more important. Living our missions for inclusion must be structured and deliberate work. In this workshop, school leaders will engage in conversation through case studies and a sharing of ideas for building capacity for sustained discourse about race in our communities. Participants will practice methods for seeding and leading conversation, and they will share ideas for making systemic change.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Affinity group work - What is the impact of our personal identifiers on leading anti-racism efforts?
    • How do we work on strategies, plans for conflict resolution, and practice with leading conversations about race?
    • What are some of the structures we can employ for systemic antiracism in our school?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Eric Temple, Lick-Wilmerding High School (CA); Martha Haakmat, Haakmat Consulting
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Are They Ready? Discussing Mass Incarceration With Middle School Students and Building an Activist Toolkit C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: This workshop is for anyone who has ever asked or been asked, “But are they ready for this?” We are invested in popping the independent school “bubble” and directly situating and implicating our students in the system of mass incarceration. In order to free ourselves from the constraints that bind us, we must first make these constraints visible. Though these concepts may seem too heady and complex, this interactive workshop will give educators implementable strategies and activities that support middle school students to be engaged in developmentally appropriate conversations about justice and situated toward activism. We will emphasize true, authentic story-sharing and listening and believing.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 5
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can I effectively introduce a complex topic in a way that a middle school student can engage with critically?
    • What are things we need to unlearn as educators in order to empower our students?
    • Are there any activities or pedagogical practices that I can easily implement in my school to begin doing this work?
  • Presenters: Phyllis Dugan, Riverdale Country School (NY); Emily Schorr Lesnick, University Prep (WA)
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Our Histories, Our Selves: Using PoC Stories to Liberate, Co-Create, and Thrive in Humanities Classrooms On Demand C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: When teachers of color bring their full and authentic selves to campus and the classroom, powerful things happen. This includes sharing our personal stories and other empowering narratives about people of color to help students explore past and current events. From enslavement to protest movements to immigration, we will model story-sharing and encourage teachers to push students closer to issues of historical and modern significance while building stronger relationships. This workshop will provide specific examples from the middle school classroom, including literature resources, lesson plans, and templates for creating future curriculum. Participants will have the opportunity to share their personal histories and think about how those stories might engage, inform, and inspire students.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 211
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can we present empowering narratives to and about students of color?
    • How can teachers use their personal histories to inform students about past and current events?
    • What role does identity play in the humanities classroom?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Lesley Younge, Whittle School and Studios (DC); Thu Nguyen, Sidwell Friends School (DC)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
The White Elephant in the Room: Navigating the Reality of Whiteness at PoCC C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Over a decade ago, NAIS declared that the “original purpose” of the PoCC was “providing people of color in our schools a sanctuary and a ‘voice.’” Since then, the number of white people at the conference has been growing at an increasingly rapid rate, which raises the question of whether this original purpose has remained intact. While conversations about white people at PoCC are ubiquitous among attendees who are people of color, the topic can still be difficult to discuss. This panel aims to address this fraught issue by exploring ways in which we can productively navigate the reality of white people at PoCC.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Tahoma 1
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do we keep the People of Color Conference a sanctuary for people of color in the face of an increasing white presence?
    • What knowledge and practices can we develop that allow people of color to navigate whiteness at the PoCC while still remaining faithful to the conference’s mission statement of “provid[ing] a unique, safe, and engaging space for leadership, professional development, and networking for people of color as it relates to their experience in independent schools”?
    • If the issue of having so many white people at the PoCC has been an ongoing discussion that conference attendees talk about informally, how can we provide a public forum that positively encourages allyship?
  • Presenters: Tim Rosenwong, Pacific Ridge School (CA); Alison Park, Blink Consulting; Drew Ishii, Sage Hill School (CA); Marcus Chang, Thaden School (AR)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
All the Wealth They Cannot See: Cultural Assets and Community Capital C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Eurocentric models are routinely applied to people of color in independent schools. In primarily white institutions, those marginalized by racism have their cultures judged as problematic, deficient, and dysfunctional. Institutions themselves typically offer assimilation and adaptation to white culture as the sole means of success, while failure to succeed by students of color is blamed on individual limitations, not the oppressive system itself. How can we refute this dominant ideology and create a counternarrative that validates and centers the experiences of marginalized students? What types of capital are nurtured by communities of color, and what forms of cultural wealth do our students bring to our institutions each day? Let’s disrupt the system by identifying unacknowledged student resources and validating our students through a strengths-based perspective.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Yakima 1
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are the types of cultural capital nurtured by communities of color?
    • How can we understand and leverage unacknowledged forms of community and cultural wealth in our Latinx and Black students?
    • How can we push our institutions to think beyond the assimilation model of success for students of color?
  • Presenters: Stephanie Carrillo, Campbell Hall (CA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Ed Tech as the Master’s Tools? C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: In this workshop, participants will examine excerpts from Audre Lorde’s The Master's Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House and will use this text as a framework to examine the ways in which educational technology, at the classroom, divisional, and institutional levels, can reinforce paradigms of power and privilege. In order to help disrupt this narrative, through hands-on examples and group case studies, participants will first brainstorm ways to create technology-infused projects or lesson plans that de-center whiteness using various DEI curricular frameworks. Participants will then strategize ways in which diversity practitioners and educational technologists can work together to ensure that divisional and institutional technologies, such as student information systems, reflect a commitment to dismantling systems of oppression in schools.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Chelan 5
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • In what ways can educational technology reinforce paradigms of power and privilege at the classroom, divisional and institutional levels?
    • How can we decenter whiteness in the educational technology field using DEI frameworks?
    • How can technologists and DEI practitioners partner to dismantle systems of oppression in schools?
  • Presenters: Liz Fernández and Dr. Kenny Graves, Ethical Culture Fieldston School (NY); Naomi Arroyo, Churchill School (NY)
Data Use in Activism: Evidence-based Equity and Justice Programming, Research and Evaluation
Lessons From Native American Storytelling: Creating Communities of Consciousness Through Racial Reconciliation and Cultural Competency C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Are we part of the problem? Native Americans are often absent or underrepresented in schools’ curricula. Native American communities are frequently isolated and marginalized and the subject of many misconceptions. Grounded in summer research, this presentation will shed light on Native American communities and storytelling in Western Washington by focusing on Native American activism, cultural preservation, and the role of non-Native Americans as allies. Explore how tribes adapt to evolving conflicts, model racial reconciliation, and use storytelling to heal. This presentation will share practical ways to strengthen humanities programs, build cultural competency programming, and teach multiple perspectives. Attendees will leave with ideas, action steps, and models for integrating Native American history and culture and for developing models for racial reconciliation in their own communities.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 400
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What challenges to Native American communities face currently?
    • How can we highlight Native Americans in our curriculum more effectively?
    • How can we build models for Racial Reconciliation and Cultural Competency?
  • Presenters: Marshall McCurties, MICDS - Mary Institute and St. Louis Country Day School (MO)
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
DEI Practitioner as Data Analyst: Using Data Analysis to Drive Cultural and Institutional Change C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: The independent school DEI practitioner functions largely as a culture maker and change agent within relatively inflexible and rigid systems. One way to influence institutional change is to give your administrative teams the one thing they find hard to argue with: data. Not every school is resourced enough to embark on large data audits like the NAIS AIM or with other expensive consultants. However, small data collection and analysis from a number of school areas will help you build allies and forge relationships, uncover areas of growth and opportunity, and align strategic plans and mission statements to DEI initiatives. This workshop aims to empower DEI practitioners to leverage data in significant ways to help address issues of equity, justice, and inclusion within their own schools.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Chelan 4
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can the DEI practitioner within your school leverage small or big data to drive institutional change?
    • How can the DEI practitioner find opportunities for data collection in order to create internal audits?
    • What are ways to create and target measurable growth using data collection and analysis?
  • Presenters: Joel Sohn, Amila Williams, and Jonathan Lee, Episcopal High School (VA)
Data Use in Activism: Evidence-based Equity and Justice Programming, Research and Evaluation
Deep From the Heart of Texas: Reimagining the Head of School/Chief Diversity Officer Partnership On Demand C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Let’s face it; times have changed. Independent schools are being battered by today’s tumultuous socio-political/cultural climate. As our students struggle to construct meaning from all the mixed messages, particularly those that challenge our schools’ intent to raise responsible, respectful citizens, we must be steadfast in our commitment to equity and justice work. And key to the success of this work is the relationship between the head of school and the diversity practitioner. This workshop will examine the rationality, positionality, and sustainability of the head-chief diversity officer relationship in building inclusive and equitable school communities at three Texas independent schools.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 204
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are new and different approaches to relationship-building between the Head of School and Chief Diversity Officer?
    • How do you sustain that relationship between the Head and Chief Diversity Officer?
    • What are some of the critical relational and positional power dynamics between the Head of School and Chief Diversity Officer necessary to effectively build community?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Yvonne Adams and Chris Gunnin, St. Stephen's Episcopal School (TX); Gene Batiste and Mark Desjardins, St. John's School (TX); Lee Hark and Karen Bradberry, Greenhill School (TX)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Advancing Your Independent School Career: A Reflective, Mentor-Based Approach C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Preparing to be a head of school takes self-development, experience, and a supportive team. To be a viable candidate, you need mirrors—people who will show you how you can be a more effective leader. Proper mentoring is critical for anyone aspiring to be an independent school leader, and the mentoring doesn’t stop once you have earned that promotion or become a school head. If you are breaking through a barrier of leadership, the depths of the mentor relationship go much further after you get the “big” job. Hear from three persons of color at different stages in their careers—two heads of school and an assistant head—who may illuminate a path to senior leadership, including a headship.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: Sheraton, Ravenna A-B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do I prepare for career advancement?
    • How will mentoring affect me, and how must it evolve as I move through various stages of my career?
    • What are the challenges and benefits of senior level, public leadership?
  • Presenters: Byron Lawson Jr., Trinity Preparatory School (FL); Kevin Plummer, Tampa Preparatory School (FL); Felicia Wilks, Lakeside School (WA)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Do You See What I See? The Impact of Trauma on Students of Color (Part II) C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Students of color, those in poverty, and those who are otherwise marginalized face daily challenges. Included in these challenges, but much less recognized or discussed, is trauma. Many of our students are suffering in silence. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has asserted that childhood trauma has a long-term impact on life expectancy, education, health care, and involvement in the criminal justice system. How can we help? After a brief overview of how trauma often manifests itself in students at school, this workshop intends to give participants practical strategies to help students, in and out of the classroom, recover cognitive resources lost to trauma.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Tahoma 3
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What does trauma generally look like in students of color at school?
    • How do we help students recover cognitive resources lost to trauma?
    • What strategies are needed both in and out of the classroom to better support students?
  • Presenters: Keba Rogers, Trevor Day School (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
It’s Your Time: Aspiring Women Administrators of Color C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: This workshop is for aspiring women leaders of color to learn about preparing for, applying to, and sustaining a career in administration. The workshop presenters will lead participants through a series of reflective activities, share wisdom from their direct experience, and offer strategies for working in independent school administration. Additionally, participants will be empowered to form their own networks that allow for professional rejuvenation and support as they navigate their first years in leadership positions.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Tahoma 2
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What do women of color leaders need to feel empowered to pursue administrative positions in independent schools?
    • What strategies are effective in preparing for, applying to, and sustaining careers in administration as women of color leaders?
    • How can women of color leaders create cohorts of trusted colleagues as a means of sustainability and support in a high stress work environment?
  • Presenters: Tamisha Williams, Lick-Wilmerding High School (CA); Juna McDaid, The Potomac School (VA); Lori Cohen, Bright Morning Consulting; Shoba Farrell, San Francisco University High School (CA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Seven Anxieties: Managing Situations Faced by Black Students and How Historical Events Impact These Situations C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Seven common events often cause black students and their families anxiety: expectations setting, parent-teacher conferences, mentorship, discussions of race in class, college counseling, discipline, and opposition to blacks congregating. This seminar will address the historical events that underlie these anxieties and the psychological impacts (transference) of the events on current-day families. Historical events include slavery, the civil rights struggle, and school desegregation; change through collective action; misuse of intelligence testing; and race and discipline. The psychological impacts include sensitivity about performance and expectations setting; internalization of bias; social isolation; need for safety/community; increased pressure on parents; and the cumulative impact of racism, including increased rates of anxiety and depression. The workshop will use research to provide constructive ideas for educators to address these school situations.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Tahoma 4
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are the most common school situations that are anxiety-producing for black children and their parents?
    • How are these anxiety-provoking scenarios related to historical events and what are the current-day psychological impacts of these historical milestones?
    • How do faculty and adminstrators better understand and respond to these anxiety-provoking situations?
  • Presenters: Linda McGhee, McGhee and Associates, LLC
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
The Revolution Will Not Be Digitized: Has Technology Broken Our Chains or Created New Ones? C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: In 1619, the most radical technological innovation was the printing press. Four hundred years later, we live in a digital age that seemingly opens the door to greater democracy. However, as some communities move toward ever-advancing technologies, have we paused to question what’s lost and what’s gained in our “Brave New World”? To what degree are we reinforcing rather than dismantling existing oppressive hierarchies? In our schools, there is a widening disconnect between what students engage with outside of school compared with what they engage with in school. In fact, we often embrace technology without considering its moral and societal impact. This session will offer attendees language to critique these structures and to work toward an inclusive vision for living with technology in our schools and in our lives.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: Sheraton, Ballard
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are the embedded ideologies and their attendant implications in our increasing reliance on technology?
    • How can we use history to understand the impact of innovation?
    • What are the mechanisms necessary for schools to adopt equitable and inclusive technologies?
  • Presenters: Cara Hill and Saber Khan, The Packer Collegiate Institute (NY)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Black Boy Joy, Black Girl Magic: The Importance of Relationship in Academic Success C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Establishing relationships with students lays the foundation for academic and socio-emotional growth. When students enter school environments as obvious minorities, establishing that relationship is inevitably more complicated. Addressing the complexities inherent in being black and brown in white spaces is a non-negotiable for creating culturally competent teaching practices and inclusive classrooms. Black and brown children often enter independent school spaces feeling like “the only” and unable to relate to those around them. Feeling unseen can lead to feeling undervalued and leaving unsuccessful. Teachers of black and brown children often feel ill-equipped for making the positive connections necessary for establishing lasting relationships with students. This workshop will teach techniques and strategies for supporting educators in building meaningful and authentic relationships with black and brown children.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 2
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Why is it important to build relationships with black and brown students in our classrooms?
    • What are some critical pathways to building authentic relationships with black and brown students in our classroom spaces?
    • How does the teacher-parent-student dynamic impact relationship building, student success, and academic investment?
  • Presenters: April Greene and Dawn Smith, Lowell School (DC)
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Extending Affinity Groups to Lower School Students C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: This workshop will explore Katherine Delmar Burke’s established and thriving affinity groups in the upper school and the tranisition of bringing affinity groups to the lower school students. At Burke’s, we strive to have a community where everyone feels valued and heard and everyone holds a sense of belonging. To ensure that this happens for our students, we give students, beginning in third grade, the opportunity to participate in affinity and alliance groups (and incorporate identity units beginning in the kindergarten curriculum). These groups make room for students to explore their identities in safe environments while developing a sense of self and exploring how they fit into the larger community. We will share our planning process, as well as our challenges and successes.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 3
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is Burke’s model for bringing affinity groups to the lower school (starting with just 3rd and 4th grades)?
    • What are the benefits of exposing younger students to affinity groups?
    • How we share affinity group experiences across grade levels (upper and lower school)?
  • Presenters: Tammi Abad and Quise Edwards, Katherine Delmar Burke School (CA); Julian Morris, Urban School of San Francisco (CA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Leading While Black and Male: Exploring the Lived Experiences of Black Male Heads of School C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: This workshop provides an opportunity for participants to explore the ways in which the racial identities and lived experiences of black male heads of school inform their professional lives, leadership preparation, and leadership development. Through our collective exploration in the workshop, we will consider the range of strategies that these leaders develop to enable them to navigate the multi-dimensional aspects of their racial identity within a dominant white racialized education system. We will also examine the ways in which their articulation of action-oriented social justice leadership is influenced by their personal and professional lived experiences, leadership philosophies and values, commitment to students, and sense of community. We will strive to describe the essence of what it means to be a black male school leader and head of school.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, 303
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What does it mean to be a Black male school leader and heads of schools?
    • How do the politics of race, diversity, and social justice play out in the professional lives of Black male school leaders and heads of schools?
    • What are the key components in the creation of formal leadership development opportunities and networks to provide effective support and development for current and future Black leaders?
  • Presenters: Phillip A. Smith, Teachers College At Columbia University
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Getting in Sync: Governance and Leadership for Changing Times On Demand C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Exceptional boards are very intentional about structuring themselves and operating in a way that best supports the school in the context in which it exists. Today, that context includes increasing racial and ethnic diversity, and the need to attract, cultivate, and leverage these and other differences to help ensure excellence, relevance, and institutional strength. The result of concerted action on these fronts is leadership and governance working together like the software driving the complex systems and machinery of our lives. Does your board comprise all the people, codes, and networks it needs for a 21st century performance? In this session we’ll outline the changing nature of nonprofit governance today, discuss principles and practices that drive great boards, and share proven strategies for increasing racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity in our governing bodies.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Donna Orem and Caroline Blackwell, NAIS
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
“The Love That Dare Not Speak Its Name”: Queer Language in Chinese, History, and Spanish Classes C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Taking a collaborative, integrative, social justice approach, presenters will share strategies for meaningfully integrating LGBTQ+ themes into World Language and History classes. Acknowledging that LGBTQ+ topics are often difficult to talk about in the Spanish- and Chinese-speaking communities and are often left out of the history curriculum, we will emphasize the power of language for the purpose of not only developing empathy but also building toward a justice framework. We will explore how gender and sexual identities intersect with cultural and linguistic identities, and we will create spaces in our curriculum and pedagogy to “see” and reflect the lived experience of queer students of color. We will provide both discipline-specific and interdisciplinary examples and resources that participants can integrate into their own teaching and curriculum design.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 310
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Where do gender and sexual identities intersect with cultural/national and linguistic identities?
    • How can Chinese, Spanish, and History teachers use language to better prepare students to deal with matters of queer identity and inequality?
    • What are some resources including books, films and primary sources that we can incorporate into our curriculum to address the needs of teaching and talking about LGBTQ+ topics in History classes and in the Spanish and Chinese-speaking communities?
  • Presenters: Lilia Cai-Hurteau, Marisela Ramos, Miriam Villanueva, and Yasmine Allen, Phillips Academy (MA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Best Practices for Teaching High School Courses Focused on the African Diaspora C Friday, December 6,
8:00 AM-9:15 AM
  • Summary: Learn about the depth and breadth of the African Diaspora—the spreading of people of African descent throughout the world and their contributions to world history and culture—and how best to teach your students about it. Develop a plan to inaugurate a course on the African Diaspora at your school and connect with colleagues you can lean on as you implement your new course.
  • Block: C (Friday, December 6, 8:00 AM-9:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 210
  • Category: Equity Seminar
  • Presenters: Scott Styles, St. Paul’s School (NH); Nafees Khan, Clemson University; Cary Hurt, Grissom High School
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
You’re Not Crazy, You’re Not Alone: Self-Care in the Face of Injustice D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: As educators, we are on the front lines of life. Our profession exposes us to everyday stressors including implicit bias, microaggressions, and racism. Because we are responsible for instructing and developing future generations, the way we show up to do our work has deep and lasting implications. During this session, we will work to increase our awareness of everyday stressors and receive instruction on how to apply simple yet effective self-care tools designed to protect, repair, and renew our mind and body.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, Skagit 2
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can I better recognize and understand instances of Implicit Bias, Racism, and MicroAggressions?
    • How can I lessen the negative impact that experiences of MA, IB, and ER are known to have on people?
    • What are some self-care techniques I can employ to help re-center, re-energize, empower and heal myself from the emotional, physical, and psychological stress of everyday life?
  • Presenters: Jeff Menzise, Mind on the Matter; Maati Wafford, Barrie School (MD)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Learning to Unlearn: A Spanish Teacher’s Journey With Gender-Neutral Pronouns D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: This is the journey of a cisgendered Mexican national immigrant who believes that teaching Spanish in the United States is a political act. This is the story of a high school Spanish teacher in a progressive school who decided to make his teaching an act of resistance for the students who use and promote the pronouns “they/them” in their everyday lives, especially the Latinx people of color. This is also the story of constantly exploring how foreign languages mold our perception of identities and how people from marginalized groups can rewrite how they want to be officially recognized, in spite of traditional hegemonic binary definitions (e.g., Hispanic or Latinx) from institutions and agencies (e.g., U.S. Census, RAE).
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Chelan 5
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How to incorporate the activism of the LGBQT+ PoC community in a foreign language curriculum?
    • How to personalize and adapt these practices for everyone's unique classroom setting?
    • How can Foreign Language teachers become advocates for inclusion and social justice?
  • Presenters: Abelardo Almazan-Vazquez, The Putney School (VT)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
The Invisibility of Headship: “Yes, I’m sure.” D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: This workshop seeks to explore the nuanced way our intersectional identities as people of color affect the ways in which people respond to, and interact with, leaders of color. Despite the positional authority we have within our respective schools, we are often ill-prepared for the emotional toll that micro, passive, and even aggressive behaviors have on our psyches and our ability to lead. This workshop is aimed at unpacking examples of institutional racism within the world of education, particularly in the privileged environments of independent schools. After exploring examples of behaviors that serve to silence and marginalize people of color, we will provide strategies for coping with and responding to these challenges strategically.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 3
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can one prepare themselves for the invisibility of leadership or headship?
    • What strategies can one use when confronted with micro, passive and even aggressive behaviors?
    • How do we better prepare leaders of color for the nuanced ways we are marginalized and silenced despite having positional authority?
  • Presenters: Nancy Nassr, The Ancona School (IL); Monica Rosen, Alma Advisory Group, LLC
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
What About the “Mixed” Kid? Multiracial Representation in Children’s Literature On Demand D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: This session features a presentation and discussion on the representation of mixed-race characters in books for children in early childhood and elementary education and why it is important. Research and data address the developmental affects/effects of providing multiracial students with “mirrors” through books. The workshop includes a brief narrative about the presenter’s journey to build a library for her classroom that ensures that every student can find ownership within the books. Participants will take away a cache of resources to find diverse literature for the classroom.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 204
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Why is it important to have visual representation of diverse groups in your curriculum?
    • Is there research that proves diverse books are beneficial?
    • How do I start building my library?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Theresa Fox, Winchester Thurston School (PA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Who We Are: Racial and Ethnic Identity Development for Educators and Youth D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: How do we learn about our various group identities like African American, Asian, Native American, Latino, white, etc.? Why do some of us love our identities and others of us have own-group shame and hatred? Learn how we can co-author the identity development of youth and adults for the positive success for all. Participants can expect to (1) claim their own racial and ethnic identity and experiences and learn about those of others; (2) learn racial and ethnic identity development theories; (3) identify how identity development manifests in our schools; and (4) discover ways to support healthy identity development in our youth as well as ourselves. This workshop will include interactive exercises, presentation, and small-group discussions.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Tahoma 2
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What does the research say about major stages of identity development of People of Color and for Whites?
    • How does one's current stage of identity development affect how we interact with others and their current stage of identity development?
    • What can schools do to better support the identity development of young people and adults in our community?
  • Presenters: Rosetta Lee, Seattle Girls' School (WA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Keeping the Promise: Designing a Professional Growth Plan for Retention of Faculty of Color D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: As school leadership, how do we retain faculty of color? This workshop will explore The Spence School’s ongoing design for retention by prioritizing professional growth and developing an equity-literate culture. Under the leadership of our head of school, the school has built a foundation for equity literacy through training and practice. Yet as we become more literate, we also become more aware of factors that impact the well-being and professional success of faculty of color. Job performance anxiety caused by parent complaints, professional and personal strain resulting from student-to-student racial stress, and management of colleagues unable to navigate racial tension all negatively impact faculty of color. We will share the design of our current retention plan and engage in workshop dialogue to explore challenges and ideas.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Tahoma 5
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are the biggest challenges to faculty of color in the culture of our independent schools?
    • How might schools build a culture of micro-affirmations for faculty of color?
    • What models of professional development could support the retention of faculty of color?
  • Presenters: Rebecca Hong, Davida Farhat, Stephen Mak, Michèle Krauthamer, and Eric Zahler, The Spence School (NY)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
MENTORSHIP: Taking Matters Into Our Own Hands D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Typical faculty/staff mentorship programs are not often built with racially, ethnically, and culturally diverse populations in mind. Thriving professionally in an independent school environment is often boosted by mentor relationships catered to support the unique experience of people of color. Join three seasoned independent school professionals (a dean of college counseling, a school counselor, and an admissions director) as these three women of color discuss mentorship at their school and what they have done to make it useful and transformative, not just for themselves but for their school community. Take part in an engaging conversation about learning the “rules of the road” and defining yourself in your role. Understand the limits and possibilities of mentorship, and, ultimately, learn how to honor your full self in your institution.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Tahoma 4
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Where to learn the spoken and unspoken rules of your institution as a new employee of color?
    • How to turn a mentorship into a sponsorship?
    • How to create a safe space to be your full self in your institution?
  • Presenters: Amy Walia-Fazio, Rosanna Llorens, and Jasmin McCloud, Crossroads School for Arts & Sciences (CA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Equitable Content: Inquiry-Based Math That Teaches Social Justice D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Upper school math can be used to illuminate equity gaps, highlight racial discrimination, and empower our students as change agents. So why are textbooks filled with applications like randomly drawing cards or isotope decay? As leaders in this work, we must create curricula that teach content through the paradigm of equity and social justice. Students deserve to see upper-level math as relevant to their lives and important to their communities. During this session, participants will see one way to teach content and social justice simultaneously: Stop-and-Frisk legality through conditional probability, car value depreciation through exponential decay, income taxes through systems of equations, etc. Teachers will receive reproducibles, teaching tips, hard lessons learned, and opportunities to apply new ideas in real time through collaboration.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: Sheraton, Ballard
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can I teach content and social justice at the same time, even with rigorous, upper school academic standards?
    • How can students apply upper level math to further equity and advocacy?
    • What are the best (and least effective) ways to approach social justice, project-based learning in a traditional or conservative independent school?
  • Presenters: Kathryn Breisch, District Of Columbia Public Schools
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
From FADE (Filipina American Decolonization Experience) to Freedom: A Journey of Power, Actualization, and Solidarity D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Discover the emerging power of the Filipina American Decolonization Experience (FADE). To decolonize is to reflect on internalized oppression and to heal; to decolonize is to question colonial narratives and to recover memory; to decolonize is to tell our stories and to encourage other critical narratives. Filipino/a/x* educators are disrupting the halls of silence and dismantling centuries of colonization and oppression. Inspired by Leny Strobel’s Coming Full Circle and E.J.R. David’s Brown Skin, White Minds, Filipina American educators representing multiple perspectives examine research on decolonization and post-colonial psychology. Learn how to leverage the FADE framework to identify opportunities to redesign approaches to culturally responsive teaching; to create inclusive curricula, classrooms, and communities; and to provide leadership pathways for educators of color.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Tahoma 1
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is the Filipina American Decolonization Experience?
    • What are current critical narratives by Filipina American educators?
    • How does understanding FADE framework impact measurable outcomes in curriculum, community, and culture?
  • Presenters: Maria Graciela Alcid, Gann Academy (MA); Emilia Bautista King, Sidwell Friends School (DC); Liza Talusan, LT Coaching and Consulting, LLC; Reanne Young, The Roeper School (MI); Maria Paz Alegre, The Dalton School (NY); Rochelle Reodica, Marin Horizon School (CA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Black Girl Magic: Working With White Women On Demand D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Since over 75% of educators are black and white women, it is important that we work together to support all of our students. Given the dynamics between races, this relationship can be tricky at times. This workshop will examine ways that the magical powers of black women can work with white women in order to co-create a space in our schools aimed at dismantling white supremacy and creating a more just society for all. Presenters will explore strategies that focus on navigating the tough social dynamics between white and black women that can bring about joy in our hallways, classrooms, and boardrooms. Participants will examine real-world issues and share stories of successful working relationships and the steps that it takes to get there.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 201
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do we work alongside white women in our institutions to shift their role from passive ally to active practitioner in order to create equitable schools?
    • How do we embrace the tension between black and white women in education?
    • What are ways we can work together to dismantle white supremacy and affirm our students ability to thrive?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Toni Williamson, Friends Select School (PA); Yvonne Adams, St. Stephen's Episcopal School (TX)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
The Hidden Side of Transracial Adoptees at Our Schools D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: A student population often left out in the diversity, equity, and inclusion dialogue are transracial adoptees because of the relative invisibility of their experience. Consequently, educators are left wondering how to best serve these students in the classroom. Supporting transracial adoptees is important in our commitment to diversity because these students possess a unique racial identity formation and an intersectional experience of family structure. Participants will hear from a panel of adult transracial adoptees who serve in various roles at our schools. These educators will provide personal experiences and reflections, an introduction to evidence-based frameworks, and an opportunity for dialogue on how to serve our students.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 310
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is racial identity formation and intersectionality? How do these aspects of identity affect transracially adopted students and their relationships?
    • What are examples and struggles that affect transracial adoptees in schools?
    • What can educators do to best serve transracially adopted students and their families?
  • Presenters: Matt Goldman, Burgundy Farm Country Day School (VA); Jenny Hammond, Deerfield Academy (MA); Christina Fox, The Park School (MA); Amanda Friedman, Miss Porter's School (CT)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Invoking INVICTUS: Dealing With White Faces in Black Spaces D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: People of color feel acutely disrespected every day—discrimination sometimes felt as subtly microaggressive and, other times, as outright. Yet people of color have still found ways to provide sanctuary within a white supremacist society. Affinity spaces like fraternities, sororities, HBCUs, and PoCC allow people of color to “be themselves” unapologetically exclusive from the white gaze. The presence of familiar faces, or just simply other folks of color, brings a certain measure of comfort. How are these opportunities to free ourselves from the constraints, and individuals, that bind us jeopardized when white folks access these spaces? More important, how might we support people of color who push back in defense of the spaces they consider sacred?
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Tahoma 3
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do we ensure that institutions, like PoCC, stay true to their mission and purpose?
    • How do we use lessons learned from organizations like black fraternities and sororities to help us deal with systemic racism and everyday microaggressions?
    • How can we pass those life lessons on to students of color in our schools?
  • Presenters: Shanelle Henry, Greens Farms Academy (CT); Antonio Williams, William Penn Charter School (PA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
They Don’t See Me Either: Fighting the Bias of Artificial Intelligence D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Artificial Intelligence (AI) is all around us. Facial recognition, retinal scanning, and other biometrics all use some form of database and software to identify a person. In this session, you’ll learn the ways these systems have built-in racial and gender bias and how they can amplify existing stereotypes. We’ll examine the failure of these systems and discuss approaches we can take to reduce and eliminate these biases.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Chelan 4
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How and why does Artificial Intelligence perpetuate bias?
    • What are the challenges that arise in confronting bias in AI?
    • What action steps can we take now to fight against bias in AI?
  • Presenters: Daisy Steele and Matt Woodard, Catlin Gabel School (OR)
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
De Aqui y De Alla: Essential Latinx Topics for Humanities Curriculum On Demand D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: The history and literature of Latino/a/xs from all across the Latin diaspora is something that all too often students have to look for in specific places: Spanish classes, history and English electives, and, of course, self-study. This workshop’s focus will be on exposing middle and upper school humanities teachers to topics that should be part of foundational courses that all students take, particularly as they relate to American history. We will also focus on the inclusion of short stories in English classes to allow students to hear from as many different and diverse voices across the spectrum of Latinx identities as possible. We will look at ways to incorporate current events that deeply affect Latinx people into general History and English classes.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are essential topics in Latinx history that should be taught to all middle and upper school students?
    • How can English teachers add literature by Latinx authors to their curriculum, particularly by using short stories to tell a wide range of narratives about Latinx experiences?
    • How can teachers incorporate current events surrounding migration and other Latinx issues into their curriculum, regardless of whether or not the course specifically centers Latinx people?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Miguel Correa, The Berkeley Carroll School (NY); Priscilla Morales, The Park School (MD)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Islam in Context: Understanding the Diversity and Needs Within Muslim Student Populations On Demand D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Islam is often presented and perceived as a monolithic religion. However, only a quick examination is needed to see that the religion is diverse and fluid. A better understanding of Islam and the diversity within the religion can help us understand the diversity within our Muslim populations at school. As the Muslim student population increases and Ramadan moves through the school year for the next decade, it is important that we know how to meet the needs of these students. This workshop will tackle some basic history and fundamentals as well as explore the success of established cultural competency training for faculty and staff, along with the challenges of establishing and maintaining a Muslim student association.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 211
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can we best support our Muslim student population?
    • What role does race, culture, nationality and ethnicity play into how Islam is practiced?
    • How can we create more inclusive lessons and programs that allow our Muslim students to be their authentic selves?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Changa Bey, MICDS - Mary Institute and St. Louis Country Day School (MO)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Showing Up for Our Siblings of Color: Combating Anti-Black Racism as Asians D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: We know about the model minority myth. We know Asian Pacific Islander South Asians (APISA+) are used as a wedge in race relations in America. How do we leverage this position to combat anti-black racism instead of benefiting from it? How do we build solidarity with our siblings of color? We invite APISA+ educators to think through these questions with us. Hear from four APISA+ educators about ways they have identified and disrupted anti-black racism in their communities and institutions. Turn the idea of allyship into a concrete reality.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Chelan 2
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do we as APISA+ educators recognize anti-Black racism?
    • What can we do as APISA+ people to combat anti-Black racism?
    • What can/does solidarity among PoC look like at my school?
  • Presenters: Susan Yao, Friends Academy (MA); Saber Khan, Packer Collegiate Institute (NY); Nayantara Mhatre, Calhoun School (NY); Morika Tsujimura, Grace Church School (NY)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Building Blocks of Resilient Female Leaders of Color D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Four African American and one Latina school leaders had a dream to launch a powerful experience for women of color who are interested in school leadership. Our first workshop took place in April 2018 at the Advent School in Boston. This year, we convened over 40 women at the Fayerweather Street School in Cambridge. Our work has focused on centering ourselves in the cultivation of leadership potential. This workshop experience will model how to engage, cultivate, and identify the essential elements of leadership growth and development specifically for women of color. We believe that transformation is possible when we come together to harness our collective support and energy toward a larger presence and impact in independent schools.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 307-308
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are the skills, dispositions and habits of mind that women of color need to develop in order to effectively communicate in white spaces?
    • How can the process of self-care (mental and physical) cont ribute to our leadership development and effectiveness?
    • What are essential ways that we can provide support, share resources, experiences and ideas that can st rengthen our leadership presence?
  • Presenters: Kim Ridley, Fayerweather Street School (MA); Angela Garcia, Friends Community School (MD); Courtney Martin, Hawken School (OH); Nicole DuFauchard, The Advent School (MA); Lynn Bowman, The Gordon School (RI)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Did Wakanda Exist? Seeking Truth From Fiction: Uncovering the Origins of STEM in Ancient Africa D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: The history of science and math is dominated by ancient Greek and Roman mathematicians. Pythagoras, Ptolemy, Archimedes, and Euclid dominate modern studies. Their “innovations” are hailed today as cornerstones of STEM programs with students readily able to associate their names with theorems and inductive reasoning skills. But did they truly “invent” these ideas? Through our workshop, we will lead educators through ancient Africa, Asia, and Mesoamerica to uncover how deeply connected ancient people of color were to modern innovations in science and math. We believe that understanding this history can help students undo the damage created by centuries of trauma that led to the current notion that science and math were innovations of white men.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Yakima 1
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can you start teaching more culturally responsive math & science lessons as soon you return to class?
    • How does our traditional understanding of the history of math and science affect student performance- particularly students of color?
    • Why were creators not given credit- even today (paper genocide), for their innovations and how can learning this change student perceptions of math and science?
  • Presenters: Michelle Holmes and Micyelia Sanders, University of Chicago Lab School (IL)
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Equity, Solidarity, and Allyship: How Do We Cultivate This Across Racial and Religious Identities D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: How do Jewish people of European heritage and people of color understand our different and linked predicaments in 2019 America? With the rise of anti-Semitism and racism(s), how can we build solidarity and allyship? Here, educators will engage in honest dialogue about the complex experiences of Ashkenazi Jewish people in relation to the complexities of race and racism for people of color. We will explore key frameworks, historical alliances and fractures between these communities, and strategies for engaging students and colleagues in deeper learning about racism and ethno-religious oppression. We will discuss the fraught nature of whiteness and some structural-historical realities of Jewish people alongside the realities of communities of color, including people of color who are religious minorities in the United States.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 4
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How does whiteness shape Ashkenazi Jewish people in the U.S.?
    • How can we encourage folks to grapple with racism and ethnoreligious oppression simultaneously?
    • How can we encourage more honest dialogue about these differences and potential for allyship?
  • Presenters: Mirangela Buggs, Dwight-Englewood School (NJ); Meg Goldner Rabinowitz, The Northwest School (WA)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Safe Spaces for Black Male Educators (BMEs) to Connect, Grow, and Lead D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: BMEsTalk has become an excellent source of connecting and bonding with other professional black men. —Damion Harris. Our weekly chats are clearly one of the best PD opportunities out there. Diversity & diversity of thought can’t be beat!—Vic Nixon. It’s a blessing to find community and a safe space among educators.—William Brown With a growing followership of over 4,000 people, organizations, and institutions, BMEsTalk has become a safe, curated rich space where black male educators (BMEs) can connect, grow, and lead. In this session, BMEsTalk’s curators will discuss the triumphs and challenges of carving out a weekly BME affinity space on Twitter—a space that allows for personal engagement, vulnerability, and growth on a global platform for the world to see.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 303
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Why BMEsTalk exists? How do BMEs benefit from participating in such a community?
    • How does BMEsTalk benefit non-BMEs and the broader educational community?
    • What can others desiring to create similar affinity spaces learn from our challenges and triumphs?
  • Presenters: Ayodele Harrison, CommunityBuild Ventures; William Stubbs, Uplift Education
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Just Need to Get This Off My Chest D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: How often do you have a racial experience at your school and share it? In this workshop, participants will witness and participate in a story exchange to share stories about racial experiences in the workplace. By engaging in radical empathy, conscious listening, personal healing, and community building, participants will journal and vulnerably share stories with the intent to decrease racial stress. The workshop follows the Narrative 4 Story Exchange Model, based on Howard Stevenson’s theory around racial stress and storytelling (“The lion’s story will never be known as long as the hunter is the one to tell it”). While anyone can benefit from the exchange, PoC may find it easier to vulnerably share with people who are also marginalized in the workplace. As we look at the stories of PoC from 1619 to 2019, we must also lift up our own stories.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 400
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can I decrease racial stress through storytelling?
    • How might I be a better listener and supporter of other POC?
    • How can I use storytelling to build authentic relationships?
  • Presenters: Erica Snowden, Greene Street Friends School (PA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Moving the Work Forward: Scaffolding Equity and Inclusion Fundamentals for Community Buy-In On Demand D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: This workshop will aid those who work in service of DEI&SJ progression on their campuses. It will provide maps and materials to create robust pedagogical and emotional support for student-driven initiatives, including models of dialogues and exercises with faculty of all identities. The goal is for participants to create pathways for all constituents—students, parents, faculty, staff, admins—to engage fully and openly in student-led initiatives. In order to affect positive change and embrace the dissonance that comes with real work and advancement, understanding the fundamentals of the language of equity and the necessity of whole community participation is primary. Facility with the culture (language, norms, expectations) of DEI&SJ creates communities willing to examine themselves and participate in the work in pedagogically sound ways.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What models work in scaffolding DEI&SJ work for diverse faculty and parent communities?
    • How does the use of these models seed and strengthen constituent support?
    • How do we front-load community prep to allow for more significant student ownership and success?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Stephanie Barnes, Vistamar School (CA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Beyond Integration: The Role of Cultural Identity and Resiliency in Preparing Students for Academic Success D Friday, December 6,
11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Summary: Rainier Scholars is a non-profit academic enrichment program that cultivates the academic potential and leadership skills of underrepresented students of color, seeking to increase college graduation rates and empower new generations of leaders. Students of color need to have a strong sense of who they are, where they come from and have the confidence that they belong and add value to school environments where they may not see themselves represented. The Rainier Scholars curriculum is specifically designed to strengthen cultural identity and resiliency in students in the service of achieving academic success. We will share learnings from our practice and facilitate discussion with practitioners around the implications for schools working to create inclusive environments that allow all students to be themselves and maximize their potential.
  • Block: D (Friday, December 6, 11:15 AM-12:30 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 5
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do you define cultural identity and resiliency in an educational setting?
    • What are the roles of cultural identity and resiliency in preparing students of color for academic success and leadership?
    • How can schools build culture, curriculum, supports and systems that support the development of cultural identity and resiliency in students of color?
  • Presenters: Sumiko Huff and Roy Fisher, Rainier Scholars
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Why AIM? An Invitation to Affirm and Discover New Opportunities in Advancing an Inclusive School Culture On Demand E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Seeking a more inclusive school culture? Join NAIS staff and peers from independent schools to learn about AIM, a multi-faceted process designed to engage your school community in a process of self-renewal and increasing inclusivity.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Introduction to framework of Appreciative Inquiry
    • Overview of the Components of AIM
    • Identify core members of the AIM Steering Committee members
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Tony Hernandez and Hilary LaMonte, NAIS
Data Use in Activism: Evidence-based Equity and Justice Programming, Research and Evaluation
Are We Doing Liberation Work or Just Working for Self-Preservation? E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: This workshop will ask people of color doing racial equity work to reflect on our racial equity practices through facilitated reflection and engagement. PoC equity practitioners will reflect on the ways in which we may operate in oppressive ways. Are we engaging in community self-harm by focusing on surviving the space? How do we get/create the supports for our collective liberation? How do we balance the need to preserve our economic standing (securing the bag) while creating spaces of liberation for all in our community, and what are the obstacles in our way? What have we compromised for access to and within independent schools? What are we willing to invest for group liberation? What does liberation look like, post survival mode?
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 2
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do we balance the need to preserve our economic standing while creating spaces of racial liberation for all in our community?
    • Is my work meeting it's potential for creating change, or is my own fear lowering the ceiling for possibility?
    • What will it take for me to orient my advocacy towards liberation, not just helping students graduate?
  • Presenters: Eva Vega-Olds, The Town School (NY); Dr. Worokya Duncan, The Cathedral School of St. John the Divine (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Young, Gifted, and Black: Five-Under-Fifty Female Writers to Add to Your Literature Curriculum E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: From the bowels of slave ships bound for America to the belly of New Orleans’ Hurricane Katrina; from the melt(ed) pot that is London’s Kilburn Lane to the Wall(ed) streets of New York City; to spaces real and spaces imagined, this session explores the works of five contemporary authors who’ve challenged conventional literary wisdom to create some of the most important, most insightful, most empowering literature of our day. Using racial identity development and critical race theory models in small-group and Harkness-style settings, participants will analyze readings and engage in inquiry-based discussions about how varied identities and experiences, as well as competing voices and narratives, impact the teaching of black literature and the black female experience.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Chelan 5
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Why should contemporary readings be an essential component of literary course work?
    • What is critical race theory and racial identity development?
    • What makes the Harkness collaborative discussion model an effective means by which to engage students in critical conversations about identity, diversity,and culture depicted in literature?
  • Presenters: Enithie Hunter, The Lawrenceville School (NJ)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Vulnerability, Visibility, and Resilience: Building an Affinity Space for Black Girls E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Black girls often feel invisible or hypervisible in predominantly white spaces, and there is inadequate acknowledgment of and support for the specific needs of black girls in our schools. In this session, we will discuss how to create a safe and affirming affinity space that honors the experiences of black girls, both socially and academically, as well as equipping them with tools to help them navigate the independent school world and beyond. Through small-group conversations and self-identity exercises, we will explore ways to give black girls the space to express their challenges and create a community that celebrates black excellence, sisterhood, and joy.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: Sheraton, Ballard
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do we create a safe and affirming affinity space where we build trust and community amongst Black girls and women in our independent schools?
    • What coping skills and emotional supports do our girls need as they leave our schools and enter new phases of their lives so that they grow into self actualized women?
    • It is easy to fall into talking about ourselves through the lens of whiteness or maleness rather than focusing on nurturing ourselves. How do we center joy and celebration?
  • Presenters: Kristen Goodlett, Tammi Williams, and Ashley Finigan, The Berkeley Carroll School (NY)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
They’re More Than Athletes: Educating Today’s Black Boys in Predominantly White Institutions E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: The goal of this workshop is to equip educators with resources, knowledge, and practicable strategies that can be employed to develop and advance black male students’ academic, social, and civic capacities. Moreover, the workshop is designed to help academic practitioners recognize how biases, policies, and curricula can impact and impede black male students’ ability to thrive in an academic environment that was not initially and, in some instances, still not currently designed to adhere to this subgroup of learners’ humanistic, emotional, and learning needs. This workshop correlates with the following tracks in addition to Anti-Racist Teaching, Training, Activism, and Allyship: Equity and Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best, Promising, Next Practices; Racial and Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches; and Organizational Development and Institutional Change.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Tahoma 3
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How does one bias and biases impact and impede Black male students' academic achievement and outcomes?
    • What strategies, policies, and curricula can educators employ to advance Black male students' human, social, and culture capital?
    • How to effectively connect Black male students to predominantly white institutions?
  • Presenters: Kenneth Waters, St. Andrew's Episcopal School (MD)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Rebirth of Slick: De-appropriating and Appropriately Teaching the Influence of African American Art and Culture E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Through arts education, students often enter the art classroom preconditioned to the pedagogy of European art, but as art educators, we must integrate artists of color into the conversation. Students have often been exposed, in some form, to hip hop culture, which was created and influenced by artists of color. Ironically, there lies a disconnect between the two. Both are assumed as cultural anomalies that are independent of one another. However, as jazz and visual art are to the Harlem Renaissance so are they to hip hop culture and the canon of African American and modern art. This hands-on workshop discusses art-integrated methods of weaving in the influence of African American art in various narratives in the classroom 365 days a year.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 3
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How to incorporate artist of color in the art curriculum 365 days of the year.
    • How to use art as a vehicle for closing the gap in subjects such as language arts and social studies
    • Call it out: How to de-appropriate and appropriately educate on our culture.
  • Presenters: Stacy Utley and Dwayne Wilson, Charlotte Country Day School (NC)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Leveraging Our Intelligence as Transformative Leaders: Reflections From New Division Heads of Color E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: What does it mean to have a seat at the table? Referencing the work of Carolyn Shields, author of Transformative Leadership in Education, transformative leaders create structures that promote equity and allow all students to succeed. When we finally have a seat at the table, we have a responsibility to use our position to strategically impact institutional change. But what is the impact on our psyche when we are “the only” at a board meeting and at senior leadership team meetings and when we are leading a predominantly white faculty? Hear from four new division heads as they reflect on their first years as senior leaders of color. We will share our leadership journeys, provide strategies for navigating challenges, and inspire you to take that next step toward leadership ... because independent schools need US!
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 400
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do we leverage our positionality to effect change in our institutions?
    • What strategies and tools do we use to navigate imposter syndrome as new senior administrators?
    • What kind of supports do aspiring and new leaders of color need to sustain ourselves?
  • Presenters: Rochelle Reodica and Danny Scuderi, Marin Horizon School (CA); Sheika Luc, Marin Primary and Middle School (CA); Nancy Nagramada, San Francisco School (CA)
Leadership & Management for Equity and Inclusion
Growing Young Voices: Understanding Black Lives Matter for Teachers On Demand E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: This presentation is designed to immerse a racially diverse population of students and educators in social justice education. By asking students “Do black lives matter or do all lives matter?” we will expose them to the fallacies that exist in both media and cultural understanding, make connections between today’s Black Lives Matter Movement and the Civil Rights Movement, and engage in social-emotional learning to support their development as young adults. We will help educators navigate the intricacies of teaching social justice issues to students of all ages. Using artwork, articles, and social media postings, we will demonstrate how to support the learning of students as we explore issues like unjust killings by police officers, discrimination, racism, and disenfranchisement.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 201
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do we teach Black Lives Matter to elementary students in a way that is developmentally appropriate and sensitive to a classroom of diverse learners?
    • Why is understanding Black Lives Matter essential to understanding modern American History?
    • How can we use Black Lives Matter as a core social studies curriculum to teach essential skills like critical thinking and literary analysis in an Upper Elementary classroom?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Carl Farrington and Michelle Holmes, The University of Chicago Laboratory Schools (IL)
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Let’s Get Free: Using Hip Hop Pedagogy as a Framework for Equity, Inclusion, and Liberation E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Hip hop is not merely a category of music; it is a culture and a movement. Since its birth in the Bronx, hip hop has been a vehicle for amplifying black voices, resisting oppression, reflecting reality, and engaging in social critique. Hip hop has stood the test of time and has continuously reinvented itself while maintaining both its roots and its relevancy. Whether we are aware of it or not, the elements of hip hop culture exist within our school communities. We will examine the cultural and curricular relevancy of hip hop and how it intersects with other pedagogical approaches to teaching as well as how it can serve as a framework and foundation for equity, inclusion, and social justice work within our respective school communities.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Chelan 4
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is Hip Hop Pedagogy and how is it uniquely equipped to engage and educate students, faculty, and staff across divisions and generations?
    • How do you leverage Hip Hop culture to decenter whiteness, explore identity development, and increase involvement in diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts in your school community?
    • How can Hip Hop Pedagogy be used as a vehicle for racial literacy, intergroup dialogue, and a tool for institutional transformation?
  • Presenters: Mikael Yisrael, Abington Friends School (PA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Heads of Color Sponsoring and Mentoring Others to Become Heads of Color On Demand E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: This workshop will explore how and why it is important for female heads of color not only to mentor but also to sponsor other women of color to join them at the head’s table. Heads of school will learn how sharing the story of their own leadership journeys will inspire an aspiring leader to grow into headship. Participants seeking mentorship/sponsorship will learn the difference between the two, how to seek out a mentor, and how to stop doubting their own leadership potential. Join two newly appointed heads of school and their mentor/sponsor as they share their own stories and answer questions about why their choice to mentor/sponsor or be mentored/sponsored led them to their current headships.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How will having a mentor/sponsor help me grow professionally?
    • How should I choose that mentor/sponsor?
    • Why should I become a mentor/sponsor?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Veronica Codrington-Cazeau, The Evergreen School (WA); Crissy Caceres, Brooklyn Friends School (NY); Jasmine Harris, St Phillips School (FL)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Theatre of the Oppressed: Breaking Through Difficult Conversations on Race, Class, and Gender E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: How do we spark difficult conversations? What are the ways to entice someone to share their experience with inequities? How do we strategically hear all voices in a space and challenge ideas, the status quo, and fear? The work of Augusto Boal, Brazilian activist and founder of the Theatre of the Oppressed, is a powerful, fun, challenging, and thought-provoking method for reflecting, devising, and provoking change. This interactive session will engage participants through games, role-play, and dialogue. Participants will learn key facts about Boal’s work and his legacy and how we can continue it to challenge silence and fear. Participants will walk away with a toolkit of methods and resources to provoke, promote, and sustain conversations in their communities.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 5
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is Theatre of the Oppressed?
    • How can Theatre of the Oppressed foster difficult yet meaningful conversations?
    • What are some ways of engaging people to listen, share and be present during hard conversations?
  • Presenters: Shea Fleming, The Overlake School (WA); Leslie Harris-Johnston , Eastside Catholic SChool (WA)
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Shared Voices: A Documentary on the Experiences of Faculty of Color E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Explore the experiences of faculty of color in this groundbreaking documentary film inspired by a survey of the racial climate on independent school campuses. The film examines the hardships and triumphs of faculty of color who teach at independent schools. Ten years after an initial film and survey, how has the climate of our schools changed? A panel of independent school educators will explore the obstacles and the best practices needed to create an inclusive, nourished, and diverse faculty. This session will explore how to discuss and present these topics to senior administrators, trustees, and faculty as best practices. We will compare the responses from the film a decade ago with the new film to assess what has changed and what has remained the same.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Tahoma 5
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How have the experiences of faculty of color changed over the past decade? We will compare our current film with the film with the response in our 2009 film. We will draw the data from our initial survey data from 2008 our current survey data from 2019.
    • What can independent schools do to better retain, and support faculty of color?
    • What are the best practices to create an inclusive culture that attracts and supports faculty of color?
  • Presenters: Pascale Musto, Middlesex School (MA); Ara Brown, Whittle School & Studios (DC); James Greenwood, Shady Hill School (MA); Eera Sharma, Choate Rosemary Hall (CT)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Equity in STEAM Education and Makerspaces On Demand E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Attendees will learn the importance of creating environments that create equity in STEAM education and makerspaces. This workshop uses hands-on techniques and creates engaging lessons for students. This setting helps build capacity for skills on equity and inclusion. PoC have the lowest participation rate in STEAM in school and the workforce. From a social justice standpoint, teachers have the opportunity to change this injustice. Participants will use their hands to create an engaging lesson. Attendees will walk away with a project they made in this interactive course. Maker-centered learning engages students of all races and ethnicities. We’ll conclude with a thinking routine to give participants a voice to discuss their goals for incorporating their ideas into their existing work environments.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 204
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How is STEAM Education & Makerspaces essential in correcting the equation of participation for POCC in the sciences, technology and math?
    • What are possible ideas teachers and administrators can bring back to their classrooms to implement immediately to begin empowering students to engage in STEAM?
    • Why are POCC the lowest percentages of participants in STEAM education?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Diana Lockwood and Naimah Oladuwa-Frame, The Paideia School (GA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Icons for You and Me: Infographics for Social Justice Education in the Classroom E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: In this interactive session, you will learn how to do an “infographic project” in your classroom as a means for students to engage in topics surrounding social and racial justice. Infographics are not only fun for students; they also force students to understand the depth and extent of injustice. Infographics generate meaningful classroom discussions, and they educate and inform both the student body and the greater school community. The presenters will share how they instituted the project in both middle and high schools, and they will provide all the tools necessary for success at your school. Participants who bring a laptop to the session will have an opportunity to create their own infographic.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 210
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What is a fun and engaging way that I can get my students to learn about social and racial justice issues?
    • How can I get my students to understand the breadth and depth of social and racial inequities?
    • Will you teach me how to do this in my classroom?
  • Presenters: Marc Allard and Agnes Cho, Menlo School (CA)
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
“400 Years”—Decentering Whiteness: Creating a Sustainable Community-Based History Pedagogy E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: This workshop will model a process of shifting dominant white normative thought in independent school history departments to be more representative of different cultural epistemologies historically based on community engagement. Through a process based on social justice, community activism, and a curriculum stepped in equitable practices, a holistic and balanced environment for both students and teachers is achievable. Four experienced educators will provide tools, strategies, and personal knowledge to help prioritize epistemologies that value ancestral knowledge, personal stories, and counternarratives of historically marginalized communities. We will model this process at four different levels: the interpersonal, curricular, institutional, and DEI work. Participants will leave with resources for shifting epistemological approaches in history while actively thinking about how to contextualize community-based education at their respective institutions.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Tahoma 1
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do people of color sustain culturally relevant pedagogies in predominantly white independent schools?
    • In which ways can history departments facilitate community engagement and holistic approaches to education?
    • Why is it so crucial to decolonize inequitable practices in the history department?
  • Presenters: Tim Green IV, Arthur Knox, Ebony Booth, and J'Shon Lee, Bosque School (NM)
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
The Trauma of Diversity Work ... and Getting Caught in the Crossfire E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Arguably, equity work in the educational landscape is among the most impactful of professions because of the ability to change systemic discrimination. Skilled practitioners who enter this field must be aware that this work can take its toll—physically, emotionally, psychologically, and spiritually. Those who seek to effect change by speaking truth to power while empowering students with the tools to dismantle systems of discrimination need to prepare accordingly. For the sake of self-preservation and mental health, it’s critical that these practitioners develop skills that will enable them to deal effectively with various oppositions they may encounter. Hear real stories from the field that highlight how seasoned diversity advocates dealt with situations that threatened their sense of self and well-being.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Yakima 1
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are some strategies for addressing the challenges you might encounter as advocates for diversity, equity inclusion?
    • What are the tools that you need to enable you to successfully deal with the challenges of doing diversity work?
    • What are some of the self-care practices that you can employ to rejuvenate and persist in the field?
  • Presenters: Tran Kim-Senior, Episcopal High School (VA); Dee Johnson, French American International School (CA); Johara Tucker, Head Royce School (CA); Billy Jack Vargas, Norwood School (MD)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
How to Teach Slavery to Promote Resilience, Resistance, and Rising Up E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Useful resources, practical approaches, and a conceptual framework will be shared with participants in order to build their capacity to teach the history and legacy of American slavery in a way that can empower rather than demoralize 9th-12th grade students. So often teachers are unaware, unprepared, or unable to grapple with the deeply painful reality of how American slavery has impacted American society. This workshop is designed to confront that painful reality and to mine it as a source of inspiration for social justice, equity, and inclusion. Immensely valuable for white teachers tasked with teaching slavery, this workshop is particularly powerful for teachers of African descent who play the all-important role of both educator of all and supporter of African-descended affinity groups.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Tahoma 4
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can we teach the history of slavery to honor both the immense resilience and the immense struggle necessary to seize freedom?
    • How do we fully humanize the legacy of enslaved individuals such that we can actually understand the horror they endured and the immense resiliency they showed?
    • How do we grapple with the all too common refrain of young people--"that would have never been me"--so that they can honor their own spirit of resistance without diminishing that of their ancestors?
  • Presenters: Michael Molina, Gilman School (MD); Miller Boyd, Whitfield School (MO)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Teaching Asian American History to Expand the Narrative and Build Connections E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: By framing curriculum through an Asian American lens, educators change the dominant story and illuminate new perspectives. Exploring these invisible stories in history helps uncover larger truths and creates more equitable school communities. Asian Americans are often a misunderstood community, seen as the “perpetual foreigner” or the “model minority.” In reality, they are a complex group who capture a broad range of social locations and ethnicities, informed by a rich immigration history with distinctive regional and geographic factors. And they have played a strong role in combating racism and inequity. Presenters will discuss the importance of teaching Asian American studies and how they and others are doing this in schools today. Participants will also get an overview of lesson activities and workshops they can bring back to their schools.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Tahoma 2
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Why teach Asian American history and how Asian Americans have contributed to society?
    • How does teaching about Asian American studies build connections between students, faculty, and staff of all backgrounds?
    • What are strategies and activities that can be used to teach Asian American studies?
  • Presenters: Freda Lin, YURI: An Asian American Education Project; Rahul Gupta, Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
A New Prescription for Your Lens on Hiring: Attracting and Retaining Faculty of Color E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Hear from a head of school, other administrators, and faculty about their journeys in hiring. With people of color making up more than a quarter of the faculty, staff, and administrators, Seattle Academy is a beacon for independent schools seeking to diversify their communities. In this workshop, participants will have an opportunity to reflect on the institutional origin stories, protocols, and hierarchy of values that underlie decision-making and community building at their schools. Learn how to obtain and retain diverse candidates; develop your alumni and current employees to fill future leadership roles; create multiple entry points and sources for referrals; and decrease opportunities for unintended bias to enter the hiring process. Hear current faculty of color share how they found their way into the community.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 303
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do institutional origin stories, protocols and hierarchy of values underlie decision-making and community building?
    • What are strategies for obtaining and retaining diverse candidates?
    • How can schools decrease unintended bias within the hiring process?
  • Presenters: Danae Howe and Rob Phillips, Seattle Academy of Arts and Science (WA)
Organizational Development & Institutional Change
Incorporating Issues of Equity and Inclusion in Middle School Science E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: In science class, issues of equity, race, and inclusion are often set aside in favor of “just the facts.” The curriculum can become an exhaustive list of vocabulary, with little grounding in the “real world.” However, earth science, environmental science, and biology offer multiple touch points to address issues of social justice and ethics. Incorporating these topics into the curriculum opens the door for open-ended discussions, student opinions, and opportunities for extension. This workshop offers examples of how to blend these issues into a middle school science curriculum, either as mini-lessons, comprehensive student activities, or enrichment projects that allow passionate students to dig deeper. Workshop participants will examine their own scope and sequence to find “low-hanging” ways to bring equity into their classrooms.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 310
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can I incorporate issues of equity and inclusion into my science curriculum?
    • How can I engage students with real-life applications of their science knowledge?
    • How do I make room for student opinion and debate in a subject that is often presented as "just the facts'?
  • Presenters: Simon Alejandrino and Alex Pollard, Redwood Day (CA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Making a Way Out of No Way: Creating a Professional Sisterhood On Demand E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: How do women of color who work in predominantly white independent schools do more than survive at the intersection of race, gender, and class? What is a professional sisterhood, and how can it provide the keys to a genuine sense of belonging in workspaces where marginalization and isolation are par for the course? Join several administrators as they discuss the challenges of navigating PWIs as women of color and the joy they have discovered through the creation of their own professional sisterhood. This interactive workshop will include strategies for identifying or creating professional sisterhoods that address the challenges of time and distance constraints and provide specific ideas on how to maintain authenticity and value in these networks.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 211
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are the components of a professional sisterhood, and how do I identify and establish a network that fits my needs, particularly as a woman of color?
    • Given the realities, for many women, of today’s personal and professional responsibilities, how can the members of the group maintain a reciprocal and equitable network of support through their professional sisterhood?
    • How can the individuals within the group successfully navigate unpredictable challenging group dynamics that may arise?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Anika Walker-Johnson, Germantown Academy (PA); Johara Tucker, Head-Royce School (CA); Lauren Lewis, Foxcroft School (VA); Therese Collins, Northfield Mount Hermon School (MA); LeRhonda Greats, Viewpoint School (CA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
CANCELED: Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT): Hands-on Techniques to Reduce Racial Stress E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: Racism has physical manifestations in our bodies, both in the moment and in the long term. In this interactive workshop, attendees will explore how to use Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT), a powerful mind-body approach that aims to reduce levels of stress. Colloquially known as “tapping,” EFT was founded on the principles of acupuncture, acupressure, neuroplasticity, and epigenetics and is supported by peer-reviewed research. EFT can be used with students at all grade levels. By the end of this workshop, attendees will have learned how to use basic EFT skills. We will practice using tapping for ourselves or with students in moments of stress. This workshop is open to people of all identities.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 4
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can I reduce racial tension in the moment through Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT)
    • How can I support the health of my mind and body before and after stressful interactions through EFT
    • How can EFT be used as a tool for student and faculty self-empowerment?
  • Presenters: Harumi LaDuke, The Northwest School (WA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Failure to Thrive: Maintaining Authenticity and Realness E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: This workshop explores the struggle to establish or maintain authenticity of identity in both the student and the educator of color in an independent school setting. Participants will seek to understand how the ways we as people of color choose to outwardly present background and culture can lead to struggles with code-switching, miscommunication, self-care, and perspective-taking for educators on all levels as well as students in all grades. A deeper dive takes us into the idea of “survive vs. thrive” and how just “being” can be impactful. We will create a shared conversation about power, resilience, and liberation while shedding light on how to seize the opportunistic moments needed to “thrive” within our communities outside of the classroom setting.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 307-308
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do you bring your whole self and maintain your identity at school?
    • Why does this matter?
    • What are other places and spaces in which authenticity can be impactful?
  • Presenters: Nicole Watson and Geleisa George, Mary McDowell Friends School (NY)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Ebonics. Dialect. Slang. What is Black Speech? Establishing Academic Equity for America's Most Stigmatized English E Friday, December 6,
2:00 PM-3:15 PM
  • Summary: According to James Baldwin, “Black English is the creation of the Black diaspora.” Baldwin defines Black English as “this passion, this skill […], this incredible music.” Teachers across America use the literature of Baldwin, Morrison, Hurston, Hughes, and Dunbar in their classrooms to emphasize the creativity and range of expression among Black writers. However, providing the context for informed student-centered discussions about the history and present-day uses of Black Speech is challenging. This interactive workshop will engage participants in an exploration of Black Speech from its origin to its contemporary form. Further, participants will examine the social and linguistic marginalization, artistic appropriation, and academic denigration of Black Speech within American society. Participants will receive resources throughout the workshop.
  • Block: E (Friday, December 6, 2:00 PM-3:15 PM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 4
  • Presenters: Rabiah Khalil, Roland Park Country School (MD)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Token Hire or a Voice at the Table? #youngnumbandwoke On Demand F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: You are at the start of your career and at the beginning of developing your identity in an independent school: Who do you need to know, what do you need to know, and why do you need to know it? In this workshop, we will share our experiences as young teachers of color and reflect on what it means to be an authentic educator and emerging leader in a not-so-brown school. We invite you to explore where you are on your journey and what the path ahead may look like as you work toward your professional and personal goals.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 201
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • Finding Your “People”: How can I build my internal and external network?
    • How do you advocate for your needs professionally and personally?
    • Do I have a responsibility to instill diverse practices if I am a visible representation of diversity in my school?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Kate Thomas, The Meadowbrook School of Weston (MA)
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit
Mind the Gap: Exploring Asian American Identity in the Racial Narrative On Demand F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Throughout history, Asian Americans have long suffered through marginalization in the racial narrative. Caught in between the polarity of civil rights issues in America and overlooked in the ongoing work around diversity, equity, and inclusion, Asian American students and faculty often find themselves fighting for voice and relevance as they seek inclusion in our schools. This session will delve into the history of Asians in America, their evolution and progress as a society, and what the future holds for them. It will touch on the intersections of culture, modern cultural appropriation, and the issues of identity that Asian Americans grapple with today. Attendees will leave with a greater understanding of their students and faculty and an empowerment to support Asian American inclusion in schools.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 204
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What's it like to be an Asian American throughout history and today?
    • Who are the Asian American students and faculty in our schools today?
    • How can we engage with and be more inclusive of the Asian American perspective in schools?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: John Yen, Polytechnic School (CA)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Student Protest: Working With Youth Change Agents to Foster Activism While Balancing and Managing Risk F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Black Lives Matter. School shootings. Climate change. Immigration. These are but a few of the issues at the heart of recent student protests. Young people of color have historically used protest as a method of social change, and youth are increasingly rediscovering their voice and power. Independent schools, as educational institutions that foster critical thinking, are generally supportive of students exercising their freedom of speech to advocate on behalf of themselves and others. This presentation will provide an overview into the practical and legal issues to consider when students engage in walkout and other forms of protest during the school day. Discussion areas include whether to provide institutional support and understanding and the risks involved in providing support or withholding it.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 307-308
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • 1. When would schools foster student activism and protest during the school day?
    • 2. What are the potential legal and non-legal risks involved with student protests that occur during the school day?
    • 3. How do you develop a plan in response to student request to walkout that considers and mitigates risks?
  • Presenters: Brenda Leaks, Seattle Girls' School (WA); Onik'a Gilliam-Cathcart, Helsell Fetterman
Racial & Social Justice: Activism from the Classroom to the Community
Expanding Affinity Potential: Affinity Groups in Elementary, Middle, and Early Childhood Education On Demand F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Though affinity groups have existed for decades in some schools, they are still a controversial topic in others. Even in places where they have existed, there is still annual clarification on the need and purpose of these groups. Conversations can become especially charged when we discuss this work with our younger students and their families. In this workshop, we will explore the development of affinity groups in multiple pre-K-8 schools. Learn the vital function these groups play for students, faculty, and families—even in schools serving the earliest grades. DEI position holders, teachers, administrators, extended-day/afterschool staff, and other members of the schoolhouse will enjoy exploring different models of how affinity work is implemented in six different school settings.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 211
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are some of the challenges schools face in creating and sustaining affinity groups?
    • What do affinity groups look like at different developmentally appropriate stages?
    • How do initiate the process of starting affinity groups? With administration? Community?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: James Greenwood, St. Paul’s School (NH); Jaleesa Anselm, Atrium School (MA); Tina Fox and Connie Yepez, The Park School (MA); Kerryn Hinds, Fayerweather Street School (MA)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Redefining Time in Traditionally White Independent Schools: Debunking the Excuse That Change Must Be Slow F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Without anti-racism work at the core, DEI practices at independent schools can only be performative. Creating equitable experiences for students must be rooted in the institutional belief that anti-racism work is imperative. Practices that place anti-racism work at the center of the institution create space for faculty and students of color. In this session, you’ll hear from a BIPoC and an accomplice who are working to creatively change how traditionally white institutions perceive, discuss, and unpack racism as individuals with the desired outcome of systemic, collective change. Workshop objectives include empowering folx with tools to immediately implement through a lens of the cultural context; holding allies accountable for shifting from performative ally to co-conspirator for change; and creating and holding space for BIPoC to name their experiences.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 205
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do I identify and mobilize White folx within my institution?
    • For those White folx: How do I make the shift from ally to accomplice?
    • How do I make space for BIPOC in my institution at all levels of the institution?
  • Presenters: Cheleah Googe, Beauvoir, The National Cathedral Elementary School (DC); Abigail Whorley, St. Catherines's School (VA)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Engaging Alumni of Color: Will They Come Back? F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: There is a long and troubling tradition of many alumni of color completing their course of study at independent and private schools and never returning. Why have so many never returned to institutions focused on excellence, community, inclusion, and engagement? Germantown Friends School developed a strategic plan aimed at tackling this question. Alumni of color need to believe that they matter after they graduate and that they are integral members of the community. With this session, we share our journey over the past two years and our process, Re-engaging Alumni of Color. We will explore both our successes and our struggles, and workshop participants will be invited to share their own best practices.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 5
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What does it mean to be an Alumni of Color from an Independent School?
    • How can we ensure that Alumni feel welcomed back into the community and that they there needs and concerns are heard?
    • How can current students of color benefit from relationships and connections with Alumni of Color?
  • Presenters: Michelle Palmer and Andre Lee, Germantown Friends School (PA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
We’re Still Here: Facilitating Difficult Dialogues That Include First Nations/Indigenous/Native Folx On Demand F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Conversations around how to engage in difficult dialogues around issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion have been going on for years, yet they often center around the experiences of black and brown folx and leave out other marginalized identities, such as Indigenous and Native peoples. Additionally, they do not often address the life experiences and vulnerabilities we bring to the table as we do this work and how these affect our ability to engage effectively. This workshop is intended to be a space where Native folx doing this work feel seen, heard, and validated, and where they have the opportunity to acknowledge what within us we bring to this work and how best to face and process experiences that trigger parts of our identities.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2B
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are some triggers specific to First Nations/Native Folx that make this work challenging or harmful?
    • Why are these statements, interactions, or experiences so triggering?
    • How can we recognize and respond to these triggers in order to keep doing the work?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Lizz Albany, Charles River School (MA); Shanelle Henry, Greens Farms Academy (CT)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Toward a School for All: A Case Study in Institutional Cultural Change for an Anti-Bias and Anti-Racist Elementary School F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Students today live in a world that is diverse and changing. The better students understand their own and others’ cultural perspectives and communicate across differences, the more effectively they can evaluate issues and take responsible action as citizens of the community and the larger world. How does a school navigate an institutional cultural change process to engender an anti-bias and anti-racist classroom and community? This case study will follow the steps to change, sustainability, and commitment to action at the institutional level. In addition, faculty will share examples of anti-bias and anti-racist curriculum with hands-on activities and discussions that help students build their knowledge and their ability to perceive, attend to, and reason about complexity in the world.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Chelan 4
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are the components of success for moving a school through the process of cultural change at the following levels?
    • What is one way of cultivating a learning environment that fosters a strong sense of personal identity and awareness of the opportunities for allyship?
    • What are some protocols to enhance student thinking around anti-bias curriculum?
  • Presenters: Theodore Hamory, Donald Grant, and Tanynya Hekymara, The Oaks School (CA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
A Conversation for Asian and Asian Americans: It’s Time We Talked About Intragroup Oppression F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: While people of color work in solidarity to push against the structures of white supremacy, it is no secret that many of us, as people of color, must also address our own internalized racism, intragroup oppression, and colonized mentality. While affinity space at PoCC has served to build Asian American solidarity, it has not been a space to address real oppression within our own community. Join a group of critical race facilitators as we dive into our own taboo conversations within the Asian and Asian American community on colorism, class, religion, body size and shape, education, status, and language. Because of the sensitive nature of this session, we ask that only Asian, Asian American, Pacific Islander, and South Asian participants attend.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Chelan 5
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What are the major issues that create oppressive conditions within our APISA community?
    • How does a decolonial approach help to reduce oppression within the APISA community?
    • What is our role as educators in dismantling intragroup oppression in our student population and on our campuses?
  • Presenters: Liza Talusan, LT Coaching and Consulting, LLC; Ricco Siasoco, Chadwick School (CA); Amanda Friedman, Miss Porter's School (CT)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Building an Interracial and Intersectional Equity Conference: Engaging Students and Faculty Beyond SDLC and PoCC F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Learn how one school continued student SDLC participation and faculty PoCC attendance to host an annual internal conference on equity and inclusion, expanding the scope and involvement of a traditional “Diversity Day” model. St. Andrew’s School used sessions led by faculty, students, and alumni/ae to deepen dialogue around issues of difference, identity, and inclusion, activating individual and group knowledge gained at SDLC and PoCC. This session will explore the practical challenges of organizing a full-school conference (e.g., pushback, building alliances across school departments, technology, scheduling) as well as the interpersonal dynamics of interracial dialogue between student, faculty, and alumni/ae groups. Participants will take away key organizational tools, clear language, and steps for organizing an equity conference that holds at its center marginalized voices.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Skagit 1
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do I bring back what I have learned from PoCC to the my school’s faculty community?
    • How do I help students of color and white students who have attended SDLC to continue their growth and participate in equity and inclusion work at an institutional level?
    • How can I reimagine a traditional "Diversity Day" into year-long and multi-year community engagement?
  • Presenters: Devin Duprey, St. Andrew's School (DE); Giselle Furlonge, Seattle Academy of Arts and Sciences (WA)
Building Capacity: Skills, Competencies, and Processes for Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
Exploring the Developing Critical Literacies of Adolescent Black Girls in Independent Schools F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: This workshop will present the findings from a research study that the presenter conducted with two different black girls’ groups that met weekly at two different independent schools. The research study explored the developmental process and components of the emerging phenomenon she has conceptualized, called “Black girl critical literacies.” Using black girlhood (Ruth Nicole Brown, Hear Our Truths) and racial literacy (Howard Stevenson, Promoting Racial Literacy in Schools) as frames, this presentation tracks the identity construction of adolescent black girls in independent schools through the implementation of a weekly girls’ group curriculum. The presentation will offer recommendations for educators about how to best support black girls in schools.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Chelan 2
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How do Black girls navigate encounters of race, gender, and class in their schools?
    • How can teachers and administrators nurture and support Black girls’ positive development in schools?
    • What do Black critical literacies look like as Black girls develop them over time?
  • Presenters: Charlotte Jacobs, University of Pennsylvania, Graduate School of Education
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Power Literacy: Reimagining How We Think About Privilege F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Citizen-activist Eric Liu encourages us all to become power literate in order to effect change. He posits that “the deepest truth is that we the people are not merely the passive receptacles or objects of power. We are the very source of power.... We generate it. We give it.” Inspired by this, we developed a new framework for approaching issues of privilege and positionality after experiencing resistance from students about discussing privilege. Instead of focusing on privilege and who has it, we asked students to map their relationship and access to power and to consider their responsibility to use that power for the greater good. Join us to learn more about implementing a similar framework resulting in increased participation and fluency in conversations about equity and justice.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 210
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • What does being literate in power mean?
    • How can we reframe privilege so that students understand it without experiencing unproductive guilt and/or shame?
    • How can we empower students to engage with systems of power and their positionality within them in a productive manner?
  • Presenters: Alegria Barclay and Alison Williams, The Nueva School (CA)
Equity & Justice Exemplars: Programs, Models, Best/Promising/Next Practices
Gestural Journeys: Indian Classical Dance as a Vehicle for Self-Expression and Identity Exploration F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: This presentation explores how the study of a classical Indian dance form informed and shaped the presenter’s journey as a second-generation member of the Indian diaspora. How can a movement form rooted in a rich gestural vocabulary be used to explore our own identities and personal cultural journeys? How does our own journey of identity formation and self-reflection impact and shape who we are as educators dedicated to cross-cultural understanding and social justice? This workshop will incorporate gentle physical movement, gestural language, and cultural and historical narratives about and from Indian classical dance to broaden our perspectives on the arts as a vehicle for self-expression and identity formation. Be prepared to move (all abilities welcome), to share stories, and to listen and communicate, both verbally and nonverbally.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC-CC, Tahoma 1
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can a movement form rooted in a rich gestural vocabulary be used to explore our own identities and personal cultural journeys?
    • How does our own journey of identity formation and self-reflection impact and shape who we are as educators dedicated to cross-cultural understanding and social justice?
    • How can exploring pivotal moments in our lives through movement exercises help us reflect more deeply on our practice as teachers and learners?
  • Presenters: Shobana Ram, The Dalton School (NY)
Racial & Ethnic Identities: Developmental Models, Frameworks, Approaches
Taboo Topics: Talking About Race, Class, and Privilege in the Classroom F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: “Shh. We don’t talk about that.” Taboo topics abound in our society, and children learn from a young age which questions are okay to ask and which are not. The most well-intentioned of us often avoid inviting complex conversations into our classrooms. Join us as we engage in activities and dialogue in order to deepen understanding of the impact of the silences adults create around race, class, and privilege. Learn language, be introduced to tools, and gather resources as we begin to think about how to create “safer” and more inclusive classroom spaces.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 303
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How can we as teachers of young children lean into complex conversations about race, class and privilege?
    • What does it actually look like to explore "taboo topics" with elementary aged students?
    • What can teachers do and what actions can we take in order to be responsive and proactive diversity and equity practitioners with young children?
  • Presenters: Monique Marshall and Tahnee Munoz, Wildwood School (CA)
Anti-racist Teaching, Training, Activism & Allyship
Racism in Children’s Music: Practical Steps for Liberating Music for the Black Child On Demand F Saturday, December 7,
10:00 AM-11:15 AM
  • Summary: Children in the black community are being musically neglected and ignored. This is because there is no national children’s music programming in our community. Our children are forced to listen to inappropriate adult music, which has a negative impact on their social, cultural, and academic development. The presenter calls this “music adultification.” This workshop will explore the history of racism in children’s music, how popular nursery rhymes continue to be used to reinforce inferiority complexes in children, and the cultural appropriation of African music in popular children’s movies. It will highlight the award-winning teaching artists of color who are creating culturally relevant music for children. Participants will leave with practical solutions/resources to help parents, teachers, and guardians take back control of their children’s music-listening experience.
  • Block: F (Saturday, December 7, 10:00 AM-11:15 AM)
  • Room number: WSCC, 2A
  • Category: General Workshop
  • Learning objectives:
    • How to provide Black children with age and culturally appropriate children's music of different genres beyond the mainstream?
    • Are there nursery rhymes in which I should not be allowing my children to hear?
    • Are there any children’s music radio stations that cater to the Black community?
  • Type: On Demand
  • Presenters: Devin Walker, The Uncle Devin Show LLC
Self-Efficacy & Empowerment: Mind, Body, Spirit